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Report: U.S. Soccer proposes big money tournament to CONMEBOL

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Imagine a tournament which invites the best teams in North and South America for a summer football festival.

You could even call it the Copa America.

[ MORE: Tuesday’s PL match recaps ]

Joking aside, reports Tuesday say that U.S. Soccer has proposed a big dollar tournament to run at the same time as EURO 2020, guaranteeing a share of $200 million for 16 nations.

It would look a lot like the Copa America Centenario and also guarantee nearly nonstop soccer viewing from near sun-up to sundown in 2020 and oh goodness, let’s do this thing (reporting by the esteemed Andrew Das of the New York Times).

In his letter, a draft of which was seen by The New York Times, Cordeiro took pains to emphasize that the new event would be a singular tournament, and not meant to replace existing events like the Copa América or the Gold Cup, which would continue separately. Conmebol, which will contest this year’s Copa in June and July in Brazil, said last year that it was planning to shift the Copa América to a quadrennial schedule starting in 2020, to coincide with UEFA’s European Championship. Concacaf holds its own regional championship, the Gold Cup, in odd-numbered years; this year’s Gold Cup matches will be played in the United States, Costa Rica and at least one Caribbean nation.

Any such move would supersede the Copa America, and seemingly be a one-off. Or perhaps the USSF views it as a chance to supplant it for good, who knows?

In any event, a U.S. based big tournament where the USMNT can measure up against CONMEBOL powers while preparing for World Cup qualifying? Beats the alternative.

It would be delightful if the Copa America could just come around to including CONCACAF (and the United States) more often, and USSF president Carlos Cordeiro is making a strong play here. Money drives the bus, and the U.S. has the infrastructure to pull off another big money tournament (especially if it were to lower its sometimes outlandish ticket prices for smaller matches).

UPDATE: CONCACAF is into it

U.S. Soccer announces Gregg Berhalter as USMNT boss

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It’s official: The United States men’s national team’s first new full-time manager since 2011 is Gregg Berhalter, the 44-times capped defender who’s coached Hammarby and the Columbus Crew.

U.S. Soccer general manager Earnie Stewart announced his choice on Sunday, months after Berhalter became the clear front-runner and 13-plus months since Bruce Arena stepped down from the post following the embarrassing World Cup qualifying failure in Couva.

Now, we can well and truly begin to move past that era. Berhalter will be introduced at a press conference in New York City on Tuesday at Noon ET.

[ MORE: Who is Gregg Berhalter? ]

General manager Earnie Stewart, the third man quoted in a press release from U.S. Soccer, says the controversial hiring process doesn’t leave any doubts in his mind. The USSF was said to have refused an interview with former Spanish boss Julen Lopetegui and formerly discussed the job with only four candidates including Berhalter.

“After a very thorough process, I am absolutely convinced Gregg is the right man to lead the National Team program moving forward,” Stewart said. “He ticks all the boxes with his background as a person, a successful coach and an accomplished former international player.”

Berhalter was chosen as MNT head coach after an extensive selection process led by Stewart, who worked alongside U.S. Soccer’s Chief Sport Development Officer Nico Romeijn and Chief Soccer Officer Ryan Mooney in developing the profile for the head coach of the U.S. Men’s National Team.

Interim manager Dave Sarachan did an admirable job while the USMNT navigated managerial purgatory, introducing all sorts of new blood, but Berhalter is tasked with inviting the right mix of veterans and new blood into the fold.

Will there be places for Michael Bradley and Jozy Altidore? Will Berhalter want to see Geoff Cameron and Danny Williams? Or is the longtime MLS man going to begin with youth?

Commisso, USSF at impasse over $500m meeting

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New York Cosmos owner Rocco Commisso tells ProSoccerTalk that he pulled out of a Wednesday meeting with U.S. Soccer regarding his nine-figure offer to fund an American soccer league due to the federation’s unwillingness to send what the NASL deemed the proper decision-makers.

Commisso and several North American Soccer League owners were set to meet with U.S. Soccer in Chicago, but changed their plans when the federation’s delegation was limited to CEO Dan Flynn and legal counsel.

He says the NASL has since proposed a meeting under New York State not-for-profit law which would have the league meet with USSF board members who do not have direct ties to MLS, USL, or SUM.

The Cosmos owner promised $250 million of his own money as well as fundraising of an additional $250 million from other investors.

A spokesman for U.S. Soccer tells ProSoccerTalk that it has responded to Commisso’s latest letter regarding the meeting, and remains open to meeting in the future, noting that it initially proposed the dates and location for a meeting.

And Commisso says the federation’s latest communication says a meeting cannot happen with any board members, as they may be tainted by being subjects of NASL lawsuits. Commisso points out that he’s suing Flynn and Cordeiro as well.

Commisso — who has rallied against conflicts of interest between the USSF, Major League Soccer, and Soccer United Marketing — says he wanted to work out a deal with the federation and its board members, but his conditions were not met and the USSF’s conditions were a non-starter.

On the NASL side, Commisso did not wish to share what he deems “proprietary information” with board members, noting that several members of the USSF’s board of directors were his competitors due to ties with MLS and the USL. In the NASL’s view, meetings like this have led to almost instant competitive reactions from direct competitors to torpedo their plans and trigger competitive imbalance from what Commisso calls “monopoly galore.”

[ RECAP: Chelsea 1-1 Huddersfield ]

U.S. Soccer says it’s protecting his information. He’s not so sure.

“The latest from my end,” Commisso said. “We’re gonna make it public one of these days. It’s not true that they are protecting my information. According to my email, they say they have to bring it up to the board. Garber may not vote on it, but they are gonna talk about it. We asked for a special committee of non-conflicted board members, and they won’t give it.”

He essentially views the federation’s request to get his plan for the league and investment as a fact-finding mission. With Carlos Cordeiro unavailable due to campaigning for the hosting rights for the 2026 World Cup, the two sides would not be able to leave the meeting with a plan that would not require further, higher approval. His priority is the bid, a critical moment for his new administration.

The federation wants a plan before a meeting. The league doesn’t believe the plan won’t be shared with its competitors, but requires USSF sanctioning for one because Commisso wants to continue to recruit players of national team caliber and playing in a non-FIFA recognized “Division Zero” league would prohibit that.

And time is on the USSF’s side, not the NASL. While Commisso and other owners have the money to restart their teams at any time, other markets necessary to the league’s reclamation need time.

Commisso says U.S. Soccer told him that a meeting was not necessary for the NASL to apply for division sanctioning before an August deadline for any league.

Commisso’s main requests were a 10-year “runway” to meeting Professional League Standards, and the ability to own multiple teams. He’s also a proponent of promotion and relegation, rules against leagues “poaching” teams, and several measures of transparency and open bidding.

He admits he was stung that after investing millions of dollars to keep the NASL alive, the USSF removed its second division status “five and a half months after my first game,” while the rival USL got more time to fulfill Professional League Standards.

He also rejects the close relationship between MLS and the USL.

“It’s monopoly galore,” he said. “The USL is largely farm teams for MLS. B Teams.”

So what happens if U.S. Soccer doesn’t meet the conditions for a meeting?

“I can’t disclose that,” Commisso said. “But there’s a second part. The law suits continue, and no one gets me to shut my mouth. I will do all I can to represent all the shareholders in United States Soccer.”

N. American World Cup bid hopes economics outweigh politics

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COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) The U.S. Soccer Federation president believes the economics of North America’s bid to host the 2026 World Cup will outweigh politics in next month’s vote.

Carlos Cordeiro said at a campaign event in Denmark Thursday, “we’re going to get strong support across Europe regardless of the geopolitics.”

The United States-Canada-Mexico bid could struggle for votes from Russia and its allies in the June 13 vote of FIFA members in Moscow.

Rival Morocco is counting on France and Spain for support, due to shared historical ties, and hopes U.S. President Donald Trump’s public comments will weigh heavily on African and Central American voters.

However, Cordeiro says Trump was not a negative factor when the Federation president met 12 South-east Asian voters in Indonesia Wednesday.

A North American tournament promises higher income for FIFA, and Cordeiro says that’s “a strong part of the bid.”

Joint World Cup bidders: Trump hasn’t sparked voter concerns

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Organizers of the North American bid to host the 2026 World Cup insist FIFA members have not expressed concern about President Donald Trump’s harsh words about foreigners or the U.S. Justice Department prosecuting corrupt soccer officials.

[ MORE: Digging into the latest USMNT roster ]

“Look, this is not geopolitics,” new U.S. Soccer Federation President Carlos Cordeiro said Monday during a conference call. “We’re talking about football and what fundamentally at the end of the day, what’s the best interests of football and our footballing community, and we’ve had no backlash. We’re very focused on the merits of our bid.”

A joint bid by the United States, Mexico and Canada was submitted to FIFA on Friday along with a proposal by Morocco. The 207 other members of the international soccer governing body will vote on June 13 in Moscow.

Cordeiro, Mexican Football Federation President Decio de Maria and Canadian Soccer Association President Steven Reed spoke from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where they were meeting with members of the Association of South East Asian Nations, a subset of the Asian Football Confederation.

A solo bid by the U.S. for the 2022 World Cup was favored going into the 2010 vote but lost to Qatar. FIFA then changed the vote rules to give the decision back to the entire membership, which chose hosts prior to 1986, when the choice started being made by the roughly two dozen members of its executive committee.

“We believe that the member associations are going to judge us on the quality of the bids, on the merits of our bid, and that’s it,” Reed said. “We’re very confident about what we’re putting forward, and I don’t think that we’re concerned about politics.”

Sixty games would be played in the U.S. under the bid plan, including all from the quarterfinals on. Three cities were included from Mexico and Canada, and both of those nations would host 10 games.

Holding a tournament in the U.S. would subject many of the documents generated to subpoena by U.S. federal prosecutors, who have secured numerous guilty pleas to corruption charges from soccer officials since 2015 and obtained convictions at trial last year against Juan Angel Napout, the former president of South American soccer’s governing body, and Jose Maria Marin, the former president of Brazil’s soccer federation.

“We haven’t had any of those concerns raised by any of the members that we’ve met so far,” Cordeiro said. “The reforms that FIFA undertook some years ago I think were spot on and we feel very confident that ultimately the right decision will be made.”

Morocco’s bid envisions spending almost $16 billion, including $3 billion to construct nine new stadiums, refurbish five others and build or renovate 130 training grounds.

[ MORE: Brazil to face Austria in final World Cup tune-up match ]

The North American bid proposed venues be selected from among 23 stadiums that exist or already are under construction, including three each in Mexico and Canada. Sixteen of the U.S. stadiums are sites of NFL teams.

“The split of matches that we have proposed to FIFA frankly reflects the resources of the three countries,” Cordeiro said. “We in the United States are blessed with some very substantial resources in terms of stadium infrastructure, of cities and so on, and that reflects the 60 matches that we have on the table. But at the end of the day there is a reason why FIFA have asked for or have encouraged joint bids and we do think that our joint bids taken together provide for a vastly superior bid than our competition.”

AP Sports Writer Rob Harris contributed to this report.