Chris Henderson

U.S. federation announces another strong National Soccer Hall of Fame nominee class

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Another tough round of voting is ahead as the final list of nominees was announced for the National Soccer Hall of Fame Class of 2014.

In its release today on the nominees, U.S. Soccer says voting will begin immediately in three categories: Player, Veteran Player and Builder. Voting continues through Feb. 7.

Hall of Fame voters – including coaches and officials from the pro game, U.S. Soccer coaches and officials, designated media members and Hall of Famers – can list up to 10 candidates on their ballot. For the Player category, athletes appearing on two-thirds (66.7 percent) of voter ballots are elected. Players not appearing on at least five percent of ballots will be subtracted from the ballot (pending availability for the Veterans ballot.)

It’s not easy to gain the needed percentage. Two years ago only four players were selected: Tony Meola, Claudio Reyna, Tony DiCicco and Desmond Armstrong. A year ago only two made the cut: Joe-Max Moore and Peter Vermes.

These really are tough choices. On this ballot there are guys who were first to important MLS scoring mileposts (Jason Kreis), guys that surely would have caught up with them but for career-ending injuries (Taylor Twellman) guys who accomplished so much despite unfortunate injuries (John O’Brien), plenty of women’s players who won multiple World Cups or Olympic golds (Kristine Lilly and Brianna Scurry just to name a couple), guys who scored huge World Cup goals (Clint Mathis, Brian McBride — pictured above), huge MLS international stars (Marco Etcheverry) … and the list goes on.

In fact, here’s the entire list:

2014 National Soccer Hall of Fame Player Ballot

  • Chris Armas
  • Raul Diaz Arce
  • Marco Etcheverry
  • Lorrie Fair
  • Robin Fraser
  • Chris Henderson
  • Zoran Karic
  • Chris Klein
  • Jason Kreis
  • Eddie Lewis
  • Kristine Lilly
  • Kristin Luckenbill
  • Shannon MacMillan
  • Kate Sobrero Markgraf
  • Clint Mathis
  • Brian McBride
  • Jaime Moreno
  • Victor Nogueira
  • John O’Brien
  • Ben Olsen
  • Cindy Parlow Cone
  • Steve Ralston
  • Ante Razov
  • Tiffany Roberts
  • Tony Sanneh
  • Briana Scurry
  • Taylor Twellman

Next stop, Sporting Lisbon: Seattle Sounders announce Fredy Montero’s latest loan

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After a spell with Colombia’s Millionarios that saw him score 10 goals in 29 games, Seattle’s Fredy Montero has earned a ticket to Europe, albeit not the one he and his club may have originally hoped for. Montero’s on his way to Sporting Club of Portugal on loan, with an option to buy seeing the Sounders’ all-time leading scorer potentially move for a reported $3.3 million.

The club confirmed the move Monday, one which had been rumored for some time, though most anticipated the transfer would be a permanent one from the get start. But while a loan does get Montero to Portgual, it also makes his initial spell with Sporting a try-out. If he doesn’t perform well this fall, the club can walk away, leaving him to return to Seattle.

This isn’t exactly what many anticipated when Montero left Seattle this winter. When the Sounders let Montero return home, the player’s professed (but thin) explanation was to increase his chances to get into the Colombian national team. Others saw a Copa Libertadores campaign as a potential springboard to European transfer. After decent results (eight goals in 22 league games, no goals in five Copa matches), the full transfer didn’t come, though Montero has earned a look from one of Portugal’s three biggest clubs.

But with that look being only a loan, it’s worth considering whether this process has been worth it for Seattle. Or the player. Adrian Hanauer, Chris Henderson, and Sigi Schmid made the decision to move away from Montero this winter, a choice portended by Schmid’s use of the player at the end of last year’s playoffs (removing him from his final game). Combined with Montero’s desire to move, the loan to Millionarios seemed like a win-win situation for both parties. Montero gets his springboard, and Seattle gets to remake a club they felt needed to be tweaked in order to advance farther in the playoffs.

But with Seattle struggling in the standings and Montero failing to land a permanent move, both sides seem worse off for the gambit. Had Montero stayed, it’s likely he would have continued producing at the same levels that made him one of the league’s best attackers. Seattle, retaining their most creative player, could be playing more like last year’s team than the one that’s slumped to seventh in the Western Conference. Granted, we’d still be having the same trite debates about Montero’s big game performances and effort, but on the field, both the Sounders and the player may be better off.

Now comes Montero’s chance to establish himself in Europe, which won’t be easy. His failure to light up the Colombian league meant Sporting were reluctant to pay the $3 million-plus fee Seattle was said to be asking, leaving Seattle willing to accept a chance at recouping that money in the future. If that can’t — if Montero can’t do more to justify the fee than he did in Colombia — Seattle and their franchise’s best player may be set of an awkward reunion at the end of the loan.