Danny Rose

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Spurs’ Rose unsure where he’ll be playing next season

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Like an increasingly large number of Tottenham Hotspur players, Danny Rose admits he doesn’t know where he’ll be playing his soccer come August.

[ MORE: Tiemoue Bakayoko to stay at Chelsea this season, says agent ]

With two years remaining on his current contract, the soon-to-be 29-year-old left back says it’s “no secret” he’s been linked with a move away from Tottenham, and he’s now at the point of his career where he accepts that he might not be the club’s no. 1 priority at his position — quotes from the BBC:

“If I’m back at Tottenham next season, great. If I’m not, great. I don’t know what the future holds now, but I’m looking forward to a break.

“It’s not about regular first-team football. I know my age and I know how the club’s run in terms of, if you get to a certain age they might look to ship you on.”

“I’ll be just sitting tight over the next few weeks and just seeing what happens. Either way, I’m prepared for whatever happens.”

Rose has been linked with a move to both Manchester City and Manchester United in the past, and at one point went public with his desire to leave Spurs before ultimately remaining at the club.

Ajax takes 1st leg lead at Spurs

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  • Just 3 combined shots on target
  • Van de Beek nets lone marker
  • Spurs with 51 percent possession

Spurs couldn’t find the goal in a 1-0 loss to Ajax in the first leg of their UEFA Champions League semifinal at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium on Tuesday.

Donny van de Beek scored a 15th minute goal to give Ajax its win, with the second leg set for May 8 at Amsterdam Arena.

[ MORE: Full lineups, stats, box score ]

Van de Beek’s goal was a pretty bit of play, aided by Danny Rose‘s jump out of position.

The 22-year-old, who also scored against Juventus in the second leg of the quarterfinals, zipped through the box to meet a terrific pass from Hakim Ziyech.

Van de Beek faked a right-footed shot before using his actual effort to beat Hugo Lloris for 1-0.

Spurs were seemingly set to suffer a heavy loss when Jan Vertonghen was bloodied and dazed, but he was allowed to return to the match.

There were moments for Spurs, with Dele Alli perhaps the liveliest of the attackers.

The second best chance of the game was also Ajax’s, as David Neres chipped a shot off the far post which would’ve put Tottenham in a world of hurt.

A late set piece for Spurs saw Toby Alderweireld‘s header of a Christian Eriksen free kick pop over the bar.

Rose slams UEFA, says no interest in coaching in honest racism chat

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In a lengthy interview with Sky Sports, Tottenham and England defender Danny Rose spoke up about the racist abuse he has received in his career and spoke about his future in the game – or lack thereof.

Rose most notably criticized UEFA for its punishment of Montenegro for racist chants directed towards Rose and other players when England visited for a Nations League match in March. UEFA announced Montenegro would play its next home match behind closed doors, to which Rose replied he was “at a loss for words.”

I don’t think it’s a harsh enough punishment,” Rose said. “I’m not surprised. It’s obviously a bit of a shame this is where we’re at now and I just have to get on with it,” the England left-back added. It’s a bit shocking but there’s not much I can do now. I just hope I don’t ever have to play there again and we just have to move on now.”

The ban leaves Montenegro with an empty stadium for a visit from Kosovo for Euro 2020 qualification in early June.

The 28-year-old also said he has “no interest in” earning his coaching badges, calling it a “waste of time” due to the disadvantages black coaches face.

Rose said in early April that he “can’t wait to see the back of” the sport when he retires, and while at the time those comments were taken to mean he was excited to leave his playing days behind, he expanded upon those to say he has no desire to coach as well.

“When I said I wanted to walk away from football, people think I was just talking about the two or three incidents that have happened on the pitch,” Rose said to Sky Sports. “When I said that, I was talking about the lack of black managers in football now, or working upstairs in football clubs. People ask me if I want to do my coaching badges. Why? You are not given a chance, so no, I wouldn’t be looking forward to doing my badges – it is a waste of time. That is what I meant by I am looking forward to calling it day when the time is right.”

Rose pointed at former Tottenham and Arsenal defender Sol Campbell, currently in his first managerial job as boss of League Two side Macclesfield Town, compared to other former players. “No disrespect to League Two, others are at the top end of the Championship, top end of the Premier League for their first jobs, even national teams,” Rose said. “If somebody like Sol Campbell, with his resume, who he has played for, what he has won – possibly at the time there may have been an argument that he was England’s best centre-half – if he has had to go to the bottom of League Two, which I wouldn’t mind doing, and others get to be here, why would I want to do that?”

Steven Gerrard is the most high-profile recent case of a white former player earning a top-level job in his first go, currently in charge of Scottish side Rangers.

Spurs players ready for ‘people upstairs’ to invest, starting with Eriksen

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Tottenham Hotspur players see the writing on the wall: their massive, and continued, overachievement is at risk of being undone by the club’s decision makers if they don’t get on board and back the first team this summer.

[ MORE: Top Premier League storylines for Week 36 ]

Danny Rose has called upon the hierarchy, with Daniel Levy chief among them, to start moving in that direction by re-signing Christian Eriksen to a new contract this summer. Eriksen, whose contract is set to expire next summer, is reportedly one of the first names on Real Madrid’s shopping list. Rose is adamant that losing the Danish playmaker would be a crippling blow for the team, as tends to be the case when he’s not playing — quotes from the Guardian:

“It’s obviously vital [that Eriksen re-signs]. If you look over the five years that the manager’s been here, Christian has played the most games and that says a lot. When Christian doesn’t play, there are questions that we don’t look the same. He links everything up for us. The lads in the changing room trust the people upstairs to hopefully get him to sign.”

Mauricio Pochettino has clearly been brilliant in leading a young squad to the brink of a fourth straight top-four finish while also guiding Tottenham to the Champions League semifinal next week, when they’ll face Ajax for a chance to compete in club soccer’s premier fixture. Yet, it all feels so tenuous after the club’s hierarchy elected to make not a single signing last summer or in January.

[ KLOPP: Whatever happens in title run-in, Liverpool will have “no regrets” ]

Injuries have ravished a thin squad, which was only exacerbated by post-World Cup fatigue for so many players, but Pochettino has found a way to make it work. Moussa Sissoko and Harry Winks became a formidable midfield duo against all odds, while Son Heung-min has ascended to superstardom. These are bold rolls of the dice which came up Spurs. That’s no way to operate a club at the highest level, though, and Rose knows it.

“We have every possible foundation at the club — the training ground, the stadium now, the fanbase, the players. But it’s not just the foundations that attract players and make players want to stay. It’s out of the players’ control. We just have to trust that the people upstairs are going to do whatever they see fit to help us make that next step. We know that our manager is a winner. He demands the best from us and he wants to win something, as well. So while everybody is on the same page, we can just look forward to next season and see what it brings.”

Then again, this time last year had most bystanders, this writer included, thinking the exact same thing — “They have to bring in reinforcements, because there’s no way Pochettino can string this thing together with bubble gum and shoelaces for another year” — and here we are, with Spurs 180 minutes from the Champions League final and and four points clear of fifth-place Arsenal with three games left to play.

It’s a different story altogether, though, when an influential member of the team like Rose comes out and says so plainly what everyone else is thinking. Because if he’s thinking it and saying it publicly, everyone else in the locker room is thinking it, too.

Vertonghen: VAR forcing players to ‘change the way we defend’

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Jan Vertonghen believes the ongoing introduction of video review is forcing players to change the way they play the game — and in particular, the way they defend — in the wake of a nearly season-altering call that went against Tottenham Hotspur on Tuesday.

[ MORE: Harry Kane could miss rest of season, says Pochettino ]

Tottenham defender Danny Rose was adjudged, only upon video review, to have committed a handball offense inside his own penalty are, resulting in a penalty kick being awarded to Manchester City in the two sides’ UEFA Champions League quarterfinal clash. Prior to Bjorn Kuipers’ video assistant alerting him to a possible offense, there were no protests from Man City’s players.

Hugo Lloris bailed Rose and Co., out of trouble by saving Sergio Aguero’s ensuing penalty kick, thus negating the impact the decision had on Tuesday’s game. Vertonghen’s more specific point, however, that it’s a slippery slope to review incidents like this one in slow-motion, is a worthwhile and well-reasoned one — quotes from the BBC:

“Football is always a very emotional game, and VAR is changing that a bit. I think we have to change the way we defend.”

“I think so many things look like a penalty in slow motion. We are not pulling people down but even a small touch, if you watch it 20 times in slow motion, it will give so many more penalties.

“I think in the next few years in the Premier League, you will see at least 20, 30, 40 more penalties. I think we all need to adapt. Sometimes you can’t do anything else than put your body on the line. It’s important that referees think as a football player sometimes.

“You can’t even touch anyone. Before it was quite physical, but in a fair way, now you are too scared to get close to someone.”

It’s important to note that Vertonghen isn’t saying video review is bad, or that he doesn’t like it; he’s offering his honest assessment of how it’s been applied thus far and how he sees that affecting the way the game is played. He’s being anything but critical.

[ MORE: Lloris, Son give Spurs lead over Man City (video) ]

The most interesting part of Vertonghen’s comments are the ones regarding slow-motion replays. He’s 100 percent correct in his point that our interpretation of fouls, among most other things, are drastically altered by slow-motion replays.

For instance, to see Rose slide into the path of Raheem Sterling‘s shot and block the ball with his arm in slow motion, because the replay takes so long to view from beginning to end, we are tricked into thinking, “He’s had plenty of time to put his arm down there, that’s his fault for leaving it up,” when in reality Rose has made the decision to slide in, actually slid in, the shot was fired and he’s blocked it with his arm all in little more than a second’s time.

[ MORE: Three things we learned from Spurs’ victory over Man City ]

For this reason, slow-motion replays shouldn’t be used for anything other than to confirm a certain action happened (i.e. did the ball hit the player’s arm, or did it come off his chest/shoulder first?). As for determining intent of offenses like handball or red-card tackles — the same thought process as before applies to a player leaving his studs exposed above the ball — referees should only be shown full-speed replays to make VAR decisions.

VAR has already changed the way the game is refereed — for the better, largely — but it’s going to change the way players play it for quite some time. The powers that be need to ensure VAR doesn’t turn into a practice of micro-management and over-analysis on false pretenses.

Video review will be introduced in the Premier League beginning with the next season in August.