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Press wonder goal leads USWNT past England (video)

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The United States women’s national team opened the 2020 SheBelieves Cup with a 2-0 defeat of reigning champs England in Orlando on Thursday.

Christen Press and Carli Lloyd scored goals in the win.

The Yanks finish the evening just behind Spain on the table after the latter beat Japan 3-1. Lucia Garcia scored twice for Spain after Japan leveled the score before halftime.

The tournament moves to New Jersey for Sunday’s second match day, where Japan will host England before the Yanks entertain Spain.

[ MORE: Premier League schedule ] 

The U.S. out-attempted England 23-8 to get a measure of tournament revenge from the 2-2 draw last season. The USWNT, of course, beat England in World Cup semifinal. Press scored in that 2-1 win, too.

Lloyd scored her goal off a nifty scoop pass from Lindsey Horan, and Julie Ertz had a goal ruled offside late in the match.

Press’ goal was dynamite stuff with spin rate like a top MLB pitcher, giving her six goals already since the calendar turned to 2020.

Fifth annual SheBelieves Cup field includes USWNT, England

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The Women’s World Cup champion U.S. team will face Spain and England, two teams it defeated on the way to the title, as well as Japan in the fifth annual SheBelieves Cup kicking off in March.

Doubleheader matches in the round robin-style tournament will be held in Orlando, Florida, on March 5, in Harrison, New Jersey, on March 8 and in Frisco, Texas, on March 11.

[ MORE: Premier League schedule ]

Tenth-ranked Japan and No. 6 England have both made the field for the Tokyo Olympics this summer. The top-ranked United States plays in the CONCACAF qualifying tournament starting later this month.

The U.S. defeated Spain in the round of 16 at last year’s World Cup in France before beating England in the semifinals.

Spain is making its debut in the SheBelieves Cup. Japan is making its second appearance in the tournament and England its fourth.

Tickets go on sale on Jan. 17.

English women attract record crowd but lose to Germany

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LONDON — A record crowd of 77,768 for English women’s soccer saw fresh struggles for Phil Neville‘s side in a 2-1 loss to Germany at Wembley Stadium on Saturday.

England has now lost five of its last seven games, starting with the World Cup semifinal loss to the United States in July.

“I’m really sorry we couldn’t get the result,” England forward Ellen White addressed fans on the field.

White did turn things around for England just before halftime, canceling out Alexandra Popp’s ninth-minute header.

But just when the Lionesses were preparing to celebrate claiming a draw against the world’s second-ranked team, Klara Buhl struck in stoppage time.

As the rain fell in north London, there won’t have seemed much to celebrate for the hosts.

But the English attracted what appears to be the biggest-ever crowd for a women’s friendly, anywhere.

The previous best-attended women’s game was in 1999 when more than 90,000 watched the U.S. beat China in the World Cup final at the Rose Bowl in California.

The next biggest crowd came at Wembley in the 2012 London Olympics when just over 80,000 saw the U.S. beat Japan.

The increased interest in the Lionesses is highlighted by the fact Wembley has added around 30,000 fans to the attendance that saw England lose to Germany at the stadium five years ago.

PST’s Women’s World Cup Best XI

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The Women’s World Cup concluded its best run yet with the United States women’s national team’s 2-0 defeat of the Netherlands on Sunday, the fourth title and second-successive World Cup for the ladies of the red, white, and blue.

There will be temptations from some to give the USWNT approximately 11 out of 11 spots on a Best XI, but let’s face it: The best team didn’t often have its best game during its unbeaten run through France.

[ MORE: What we learned about the USMNT this summer ]

Some are no-doubters: Having this team without Julie Ertz or Kelley O’Hara would be criminal. But there are a lot of tough decisions here.

Should a quarterfinalist get a player on the XI, given that France lost to the champions in a brutal draw? How many USWNT players should make it? Alex Morgan did all her statistical damage in one match, but did so much that doesn’t show up on the score sheet. And how do we pick three center backs when the best defenders were out wide?

Ultimately, we’re playing a right back out of position because we can, because Julie Ertz is going to clean up a lot of messes, and because this team will never take the field: It’s a post on the Information Superhighway.

Sari van Veenendaal (Netherlands)

O’Hara (USWNT) — Wendie Renard (France) — Lucy Bronze (England)

Kosovare Asllani (Sweden) — Ertz (USWNT) — Rose Lavelle (USWNT) — Sherida Spitse (Netherlands)

Megan Rapinoe (USWNT) — Alex Morgan (USWNT) — Ellen White (England)

This was tough. Who was our most egregious omission?

Late penalty save helps USWNT to fifth Women’s World Cup Final

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Alyssa Naeher stopped Steph Houghton’s 83rd minute penalty kick, which was awarded by VAR, and the United States women’s national team reached its fifth Women’s World Cup Final with a 2-1 defeat of England on Tuesday in Lyon.

Christen Press and Alex Morgan gave the Americans leads in the match, but only an Ellen White equalizer arrived in the semifinal.

Ellen White scored England’s goal and Millie Bright saw her second yellow card just after Houghton’s butchered penalty attempt to send the Lionesses down to 10 players.

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Press made a surprise start in place of Megan Rapinoe and scored the game-opening goal for the Yanks, before White nabbed her tournament-leading sixth for England.

Lavelle has been outstanding in the early stages for the United States.

Press is the one who started the scoring, however, getting on the end of a looping cross from O’Hara and popping a header home for 1-0 in the 10th minute.

England drew level when Beth Mead’s cross beat the outstretched leg of O’Hara and White ran behind Abby Dahlkemper to snap the ball past Naeher with the outside of her foot. Game on.

Becky Sauerbrunn redirected a long English drive wide for a corner in the 28th minute, and the Yanks retook the lead moments later.

A diagonal ball from Abby Dahlkemper was well-controlled by Press on the touch line, who fed Horan. The former PSG star spotted Morgan, whose surgical run was matched by her header for 2-1.

Morgan celebrated by sipping a mock cup of tea. How very appropriate, Kermit, British, or both.

It wasn’t long after that that Naeher had to make a flying two-handed save at the back post. What a start.

Horan picked up a yellow card early in the second half, making it two awarded on the day after Millie Bright was shown a first-half caution.

Naeher made an in-tight save as England beganits fight for an equalizer.

A turnover deep in English territory allowed Press to drive at the Lionesses’ goal, but she failed to spot two teammates and instead unleashed a wild shot.

White then appeared to bring England level again, with White running between the American center backs to slot a low drive past Naeher for 2-2 with 22 minutes to play… but offside.

Demi Stokes looked to have sent England level for real, but something happened as her perfect pass got to White and saw the tournament’s leading scorer whiff on her effort to make it 2-2. VAR checked to see if Becky Sauerbrunn interfered with White, and she most certainly caught the striker’s leg.

But Houghton’s penalty kick was poor, and Naeher corralled the bounding low ball to preserve the win.