Amid worry, Alex Ferguson book could be a positive for Rooney, Manchester United

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Over a month ahead of the release of Alex Ferguson’s second autobiography, The Guardian’s Daniel Taylor, as informed in all things Manchester United as anybody, has detailed the potential implications of what may be an unsettling tell all. Particularly given Wayne Rooney, a likely target in Ferguson’s book, has just been re-integrated at United, Red Devils’ management are reportedly concerned their former manager’s parting shot could rock a newly stabilized boat.

This spring Ferguson ended his 26-year career at Manchester United with his 13th title and controversy, claiming Rooney had asked for a transfer just before the end to United’s season. That led to an off-season where the 27-year-old was constantly linked with moves away from Old Trafford, most notably to Chelsea, with speculation finally dying out shortly before the close of the summer window. Now back in the team and performing well as United’s number 10, Rooney looks poised to resume business as usual in Manchester.

Hence the danger of Ferguson’s latest memoir, which is scheduled to be released on Oct. 24. From Taylor’s column:

He might be gone but you will be hearing an awful lot about Ferguson over the next couple of months and it is probably no surprise that at Old Trafford they are wondering whether a storm of locusts is about to head their way. Or that one question, more than any other, is being asked: is Ferguson about to blow apart the Wayne Rooney peace process?

He can hardly ignore what has happened, the breakdown of their relationship, the transfer request, the cow looking into the next field and all that, and when Ferguson makes it his business to get in the final word it is a potent pot of poison in which he dabs his quill.

If Taylor’s saying Old Trafford’s wondering, that may as well as be from United themselves. Taylor’s reporting on Manchester United has been as consistently well-informed as anybody. If he’s been told about these worries, it’s not beyond the realm of possibility that United’s letting this story out, an early attempt to provide context for a potential blowback.

Given Paul Hayward, a former Guardian scribe, will have his name on the cover of Ferguson’s book, it’s also plausible to assume Taylor’s assumptions about the autobiography’s content aren’t mere speculation. Taylor’s not likely to devote so may words to the subject of mere speculation.

source: Getty Images
Rooney, pictured above running away from Chelsea’s Eden Hazard, has played in two of United’s three Premier League games this season, picking up two assists in the team’s opening day weekend win at Swansea City. Starting his 10th season at the club, Rooney has 141 league goals in 280 Manchester United appearances.

From Taylor:

But it is Ferguson’s views on Rooney that threaten the most damage and it is easy to understand why, behind the scenes, United are worried about it undermining David Moyes and creating all sorts of new issues. Rooney, as if it needs recapping, has just spent the summer trying to get a move to Chelsea only for his current employers to make it clear he can think again. Now they are going through the process of trying to convince Rooney he can start enjoying life at Old Trafford again, working on his ego, trying to demonstrate they still value him highly.

“[T]hink again” is a very telling phrase, though in that way, Ferguson’s book can actually help United demonstrate their loyalty to Rooney. If, in the face of the book’s possible controversy, the Red Devils stand behind Rooney and make it clear the player has their full support, Rooney will be able to see the stark contrast between May and now. He will be able to juxtapose the memories rekindled by Ferguson’s words and the behavior he sees from his current bosses. By being reminded how things were, he may be able to appreciate how things are.

It will be delicate for United, though. The last thing they want to do is insult an icon, so being respectful of Ferguson’s words will be a paramount concern. But the public tension between the club’s needs and Ferguson’s stories will be seen by the ex-manager as pragmatism. Ferguson’s not so self-involved to believe United’s current policies will revolve around him. As long as United leave their strongest criticism to Rooney’s private reassurances, the club can serve two masters.

One of the ironies of this situation — a potential book causing so much controversy — is the role Rooney’s book had in the divide between himself and Moyes. The player’s 2006 autobiography led Moyes to sue over claims the former Everton prospect made about his then ex-boss. The libel claim was eventually settled out of the court, with Rooney paying off Moyes while issuing an apology.

Now Moyes and Rooney may have to work together to defuse the effects of Ferguson’s book, though with Moyes having already bent over backwards to assimilate Rooney into the team, the book may only seal their new bond.

As Alex Ferguson says goodbye, Manchester United’s cupboard remains stocked

Manchester United's Kagawa celebrates his goal against Fulham during their English Premier League soccer match in Manchester
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If one of the main virtues of Alex Ferguson is his ability to reinvent his squads, the final act of the legendary manager’s career may play out after her leaves Manchester United. Having stocked every level of his team with new, young talent, Ferguson will leaves his replacement, David Moyes, free to hunt big game in his first transfer dealings. Just as the depth Ferguson’s acquired allowed him to pursue Robin van Persie and Shinji Kagawa without any desperate needs, Moyes will be free to concentrate on adding (say) Marouane Fellaini and Robert Lewandowski to an already stocked team.

As Manchester United and the Premier League say goodbye to Ferguson Sunday at the Hawthorns, it’s worth considering what Moyes will have on the shelf when he takes over on July 1.

GOALKEEPERS

Incumbent: David de Gea (22)
Near future: De Gea.

A 22-year-old PFA Team of the Year-level goalkeeper? The only things Moyes has to worry about are contract extensions.

DEFENDERS

Incumbents: Rafael (22), Rio Ferdinand (34), Nemanja Vidic (31), Patrice Evra (32), Phil Jones (21), Chris Smalling (23), Jonny Evans (25)
Near future: Rafael, Vidic, Jones, Smalling, Evans

There’s no obvious left back among the first teamers (perhaps Alex Buttner, 24), but there’s enough to build on. Finding an adequate left back shouldn’t be difficult, even if replacing the ever-present Patrice Evra will represent a small changing of the guard a couple of years from now. Regardless, Ferguson has left the defense well-stocked, with a strong group of established players rendering fringe prospects irrelevant.

MIDFIELDERS

Incumbents: Central: Michael Carrick (31), Tom Cleverley (23), Anderson (25); Wide: Antonio Valencia (27), Ashley Young (27), Nani (26); Other/Misc.: Shinji Kagawa (24)
Near future: Central: Cleverley, Anderson, Nick Powell (19); Wide: Valencia, Young, Nani; Other/Misc.: Kagawa.

This group is both less promising than the defenders but also less likely to turn over in the near future. Michael Carrick is the only regular whose age is a concern, and with his style of play, he may be the same player at 34 that he is at 31. Any transfers out will be offset by depth and Kagawa’s versatility, leaving future concerns the same was the present: United (seem to) need another world-class talent in the middle. While that has been a persistent problem in Ferguson’s recent teams (though possibly, a weakness of others’ evaluations), he still leaves the team as set as ever for the future.

FORWARDS

Incumbents: Robin van Persie (29), Wayne Rooney (27), Javier Hernandez (24), Danny Welbeck (22)
Near Future: van Persie, Hernandez, Welbeck, Wilfried Zaha (20), Angelo Henriquez (19)

If you lump the still young Kagawa (pictured, above) into this mix, and the group looks strong, even if you account for a potential Rooney departure. With van Persie set to turn 30 next year, you can see why Manchester United might be interested in acquiring a Lewandowski-level player. But even if Moyes doesn’t snag another sniper, Ferguson has left him with a number of options up top.

So as he departs, it appears Ferguson has finished performing another reload. Whether it’s successful will depend on how Moyes utilizes the talent (Ferguson has done a great job in recent years covering up his midfield deficiencies).

While handing over the keys to his successor, Ferguson has left the cupboards stocked. On Sunday against West Brom, with the Manchester United’s competitive season over, we should see some of the Red Devil depth on display.

Ferguson, on Mancini’s Manchester City dismissal: ‘It is quite amazing’

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Unless we’re talking about Rafa Benìtez, if you’re a Premier League manager, Alex Ferguson is going to be somewhat supportive. Even Arsène Wenger, who at one time had quite a tete-a-tete with the Manchester United boss, has since earned Ferguson’s public admiration. Unless you come after him (which has happened more than a few times), Ferguson tends to be pretty respectful of his peers.

So it’s no surprise that the outgoing boss has expressed his surprise at the sacking of rival manager Roberto Mancini. The Manchester City boss was relieved of his duties on Monday after it became known the club planned to dismiss him at the end of the season.

Predictably, there was a degree of gasp-shock-awe at a man being let go one year after claiming the Premier League title. Ferguson was no different:

It is quite amazing … He has won the FA Cup, been in the final, second in the league and won the league and it’s not good enough? I was surprised, but actually no, you can’t say you are surprised not with some owners today. You can’t be surprised, but I still don’t think it was right.

I was with the chief executive of Liverpool at our reserve game the other night and he told me that Brendan Rodgers, who has not been in the job a year, is the 30th longest-serving manager in the country. That’s incredible.

Honestly, that last factoid is pretty incredible. Even if you assume Ferguson means just the Football League, it’s hard to fathom, but when you look at the Premier League and see only eight men (Ferguson, Arsene Wenger, David Moyes, Sam Allardyce, Tony Pulis, Alan Pardew, Martin Jol, Roberto Martinez) were at their job this time last year, the number starts to make sense.

And, of course, Ferguson is moving on. Moyes is switching jobs. Roberto Martinez seems likely to leave Wigan, while there are questions whether Pulis, Pardew and Jol will return. If Arsenal stumbles on Sunday, you never know, and with Real Madrid’s coaching position set to open up, Sam Allardyce may yet get the kind of job he feels he deserves (ah, old jokes).

Back to Mancini. On one hand, what Ferguson says make sense. He doesn’t spell it out, but it is pretty absurd that a number of clubs have created expectations that FA Cups and league titles can’t fulfill. On the other hand, that’s the clear state of the modern world. If your team falls flat with the kind of payroll Mancini’s was carrying, you’re going to get reevaluated.

For some, it’s unfortunate. But changes like the one Manchester City’s made are, as Ferguson said, not surprising.

A moment’s pause as Sir Alex Ferguson says goodbye to Old Trafford

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Long ago, I thought I was a Manchester United fan, back when I assumed you had to have a team to care about any league. It wasn’t long before I grew out of it – an errant soul unable to believe any of his childhood dreams, disillusioned into a life of criticism and suspicion — but in the days when the only games you’d see if you were a kid growing up in rural California were late, English league matches tape delayed by your regional sports outlet, you either followed Manchester United, Liverpool or whatever other club happened to be playing when insomnia exposed your credulity. Even back when they weren’t good – before the Premier League, Cantona, and the boon of Sky’s bankroll – Manchester United were still on television all the time, albeit at ridiculous hours when even Australian Rules Football had a mid-day highlight shows on the not-yet Worldwide Leader.

I didn’t know who Alex Ferguson was, and I’m not sure when I found out, though when I did, I’m sure I didn’t bat an eye. Even to the pre-teen me, whose knowledge of soccer barely went beyond my AYSO league and Ryan Giggs’ ability to set up a defender before his next touch, there was already a ubiquity to man overseeing the Red Devils. To me, he was both unknown and omnipresent; a transcendent figure just waiting to be revealed. The only other people I could equate him to were Quincy Jones or Clive Davis – elusive, omniscient presences that forced me to stop and asked, “Oh, he’s running this? Oh, of course he’s running this. I knew that.” There were no English league-scouring friends or Twitter followers to offer alternatives, and without their second-guessing, I was sure Ferguson had been there all along.

For people my age (mid-30s), Ferguson is as prominent in our English soccer lives as the league itself – a league that fragmented and spawned a leviathan in our early fandom, leaving entities like Manchester United and its manager to transcend the turmoil. Once the chaos settled and the Premier League was born, the United boss was its central figure, having acquired its first big star (Eric Cantona) and featuring a class of player that would define the circuit’s early commercial success: the flare of Giggs; the skill of Scholes; the inspiration of Keane; and the draw of Beckham. And while the van Nistelrooys, Ronaldos, Ferdinands and Rooneys cycled in to played their part, it was the manager that remained the protagonist. In terms of plot, in terms of narrative, there was no Premier League without Alex Ferguson driving it.

source: Getty ImagesIt seems like a stretch, but with 13 titles in the 21-year Premier League era, it’s no exaggeration to say each year’s drama can been seen through a Red Devils’ lens, especially given the contrast of the club’s fortunes before and after the circuit broke of from the Football League. Prior to the Sky-travaganza that started in 1992, spurring a surge that has since redefined world soccer, Manchester United went 26 years without a title. But they won in year one. And every year since, a stretch that’s seen them claim 12 titles in 20 years, each season’s defined by two questions: Is Manchester United supposed to win? And if not, how will the favorite hold them off?

During that time, English football has gone from a lightly-exported regional league to the defining brand in world soccer, a journey which can be tracked by its exposure in this country. Whereas a soccer fan born in the times of an Eastern Bloc and divided Germany had to scrounge low-budget late night repeats for their soccer fix, converts were soon able to see games an honest-to-goodness national entity. And then there was a channel that broadcast soccer. Then there were multiple games, digital packages, and starting next year, a free-to-air network committed to showing games on a weekly basis. Now, South America, Africa, Asia all follow the league with the same zeal as we do. This is not the post-Heysel, pre-inclusion league Ferguson joined in 1986. From exclusion to exemplar, England’s become the commercial benchmark.

And amid that accompanying iconography, few presences have been as constant as Ferguson’s. Perhaps you could point to Manchester United’s titles or the metronomic Ryan Giggs as other heartbeats of the Premiership’s infancy, but that’d only be dodging the obvious. Ferguson is the backbone behind each. Within that handful of clubs (seven) that have been in the league since day one, Ferguson’s has been the protagonist. If you did nothing but track Ferguson over the lifetime of the Premier League – if you were nothing but a true believer who bought into the legend before it was born — you’d be as cognizant as anybody of what the Premier League is all about.

So if you’re relatively new to English soccer – if you were lucky or young enough to not have to wade through its ascendance, to land on the doormat of this pre-constructed Orwellian monolith – this is why day like Sunday’s against Swansea and next week’s at West Brom’s are so important. Today, Ferguson manages his final game at Old Trafford – the final chance for Red Devils supporters to pay tribute to a man who literally defined the club. And next week, at the Hawthorns, West Brom and their fans will get the honor of representing the Premier League at large. The ever-present, the backbone, the constant will be gone, saying goodbye in Sandwell in front of 26,272.

Nobody watching Sunday’s game will know a Premier League without Alex Ferguson, and only those old enough to remember Ron Atkinson can speak to what world soccer was before Ferguson’s arrival. But in our confusion we can still acknowledge our ignorance and realize the change that’s upon us. Most of us don’t know of a league without Ferguson, and many of us would not be watching without him. It’s worth a moment to consider before Sunday’s farewell.

As an American, I normally refrain from calling Ferguson “Sir Alex,” but eight hours before his final match in Manchester, I can’t think of a more appropriate tribute. You don’t have to cower to British honorifics to make “Sir” into something else, if only for one day. Use it to recognize his achievement. Use it to recognize his influence. But on Sunday, use ‘Sir Alex’ to recognize an icon is saying goodbye to Old Trafford.

Tracking a legend: The timeline of Alex Ferguson’s success

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Eschewing the unmatched list of honors accumulated over this 27 years at Old Trafford, the most repeated anecdote from Alex Ferguson’s Manchester United tenure is about near failure, not his myriad success. That’s because in 1990, in his fourth year with the Red Devils, Ferguson was reportedly on the verge of being fired, with an away match at Nottingham Forest in the FA Cup expected to be his final game in charge. Yet when Mark Robins’ goal snatched a 1-0 upset from the Reds, Ferguson avoided the sacking everyone, in hindsight, thought inevitable. He went on to claim 13 league titles and two European Cups.

That story, as apocryphal as it has become, is often leveraged by those seeking to admonish capricious boardrooms, a use that conveniently contributes to the deification of the legendary boss. Ferguson is an icon, no doubt, and his accomplishments transcend almost any other manager’s, yet there is a point where the Sir Alex iconography becomes too glib – trite. When Ferguson is portrayed as omnipotent and infallible, the irony of his failures is lost. And it’s in those failures that the we see the true character of his journey.

After three-plus unconvincing seasons, Ferguson was in trouble at United. He was also fired once in Scotland. He’s admitted to mistakes in player management (selling Jaap Stam too soon), and in his one World Cup, Sir Alex failed to win a match. He’s often showed undo loyalty to aging favorites, and over the past four seasons, his squads have been criticized for their glaring weaknesses.

In light of his resume, such critiques are trifles, but they do go to show how little we understand of Ferguson’s success. Unable to identify a tactical, managerial, or psychological silver bullet, we tend to look at 13 titles over the last 21 years, throw our hands up in the air, and ascribe it to something the transcends the successes of contemporaries like Wenger, Mourinho, or Guardiola. All we know: Ferguson is constantly able to remake his squads. As to the philosophies that underpin it? We’re content to leave that to folklore.

The truth, for all its troughs and crests, is always much more interesting. Walking through the timeline of Ferguson’s life in soccer, the momentary failures make his triumphs in the game all the more remarkable:

1957-1974 – Playing days

Ferguson was a forward of some renown, spending two seasons at Glasgow Rangers after commanding a record transfer fee (£65,000) to move from Dunfermline. At one point, Ferguson had an opportunity to move to Nottingham Forest in the English First Division but chose to stay in Scotland, where he spent his entire 16-year career. In 317 league appearances, Ferguson scored 171 goals, including a Scottish League-leading 31 in the 1995-66 season.

1957 – While serving an apprenticeship to be a toolmaker, Ferguson debuts for Queen’s Park as an amateur at the age of 16; scores in first appearance.
1960 – Moves to St. Johnstone, finishing his three-year career at Queen’s Park with 15 goals in 31 league appearances.
1964 – Moves to Dumfermline to become a professional after four, part-time years at St. Johnstone, recording 19 goals in 37 games.
1965-66 – Along with Celtic’s Joe McBride, leads the Scottish First Division with 31 goals. His all competition totals: 45 goals in 51 games.
1967 – Transfers to Glasgow Rangers for a then-record £65,000 fee, ending his three-season stretch at Dunfermline (66 goals, 89 games).
1969 – After two seasons with Rangers, Ferguson turns down Nottingham Forest to sign with Falkirk. He leaves Glasgow having scored 25 times in 41 league appearances.
1973 – After four seasons at Falkirk, Ferguson requests a transfer after new manager Joe Prentice removes him from role as player-coach. After 37 goals in 95 league games, Ferguson moves to Ayr United, where he returns to the part-time ranks in 1973-74 (9 goals, 24 games).

source: Getty Images1974-1986 – Managing in Scotland

At 32 years old, Ferguson got his first managerial job – a part-time assignment with East Stirlingshire in June 1974. The appointment was short-lived. After three months, Ferguson was soon poached by the bigger St. Mirren, who he took from struggling in the second division to first division champions over the course of three seasons. In 1978, however, Ferguson was sacked for issuing unauthorized payments to players and disrespectful behavior toward a secretary. Later, the club’s then-chairmen admitted the reason behind the dismissal was Ferguson’s impending move to Aberdeen.

Over the course of the next eight seasons with the Dons, Ferguson won three Scottish Championships, four Scottish Cups, a League Cup and two European trophies: the 1982-83 Cup Winners’ Cup and the 1983 UEFA Super Cup. Since Ferguson’s title triumph in 1984-85, Aberdeen’s failed to win another Scottish title, and his two continental honors remain the club’s only European trophies.

During his last season at Aberdeen, Ferguson managed the Scottish national team in a caretaker capacity after the untimely passing of Jock Stein. After steering them through a qualifying playoff with Australia, Ferguson saw his team take only one point from their group at Mexico 1986.

Back at Abderdeen, Ferguson turned down approaches from Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur to make the move to England, but after starting the 1986-87 season with the Dons, Ferguson was soon lured to Manchester United after the firing of Ron Atkinson.

1974 – Takes first managerial job, a part-time position with East Stirlingshire of the Scottish Second Division.
1974 – St. Mirren lures Ferguson away from East Stirlingshire. Ferguson eventually sees them promoted to the first division.
1977 – St. Mirren wins the Scottish First Division, Ferguson’s first major trophy.
1978 – Ferguson’s fired for the only time in his career, joining Aberdeen one month later.
1980 – Abderdeen breaks a 15-year run of Celtic-Rangers dominance by winning the Scottish First Division.
1982 – Ferguson wins his second trophy at Abderdeen, claiming the Scottish Cup.
1983 – Abderdeen wins the Cup Winners’ Cup, eliminating Bayern Munich and Real Madrid along the way. They’d also retain their Scottish Cup and, later that year, win the UEFA Super Cup.
1984 – Abderdeen claim a league-cup double, retaining the Scottish Cup for a third straight season.
1985 – Ferguson wins this third league title at Abderdeen
1986 – The Dons claim both the Scottish and League cups in what would be Ferguson’s last full season at the club. In November, Ferguson leaves to join Manchester United. In between, Scotland goes 0-1-2 at World Cup 1986, with Ferguson managing the team to a fourth place group finish.

1986-2013 – Manchester United: Four generations of success

Among the marvels of Ferguson’s time at Manchester United was a paradox: Monotony amid change. Ferguson leaves renown for his ability to make over a squad, having gone through four distinct generations during his time at Old Trafford, yet the result was always the same. The Red Devils were always among the favorites to win the league, and in bringing home 13 of the league’s 21 titles, Ferguson repeatedly delivered.

His first title team was built around French attacker Eric Cantona, the iconic libertine poached from rival Leeds United to usher in the most important dynasty in English soccer history. Peter Schmiechel, Gary Pallister, Steve Bruce, Denis Irwin, Paul Ince, and Mark Hughes were also part of 1992-93’s breakthrough squad, as was a young Ryan Giggs, with the likes of David Beckham, Gary Neville, and Nicky Butt lurking in the background.

Roy Keane, the man who’d take the armband from Cantona, joined from Nottingham Forest the next season. Soon Ferguson added Andy Cole. Then Ole Gunnar Salskjaer, Terry Sherringham, Japp Stam and Dwight Yorke. As Paul Scholes emerged along with Phil Neville, Ferguson had slowly turned over his original title winner into a team that would claim Champions League in 1999. With their 2-1 win over Bayern Munich in Barcelona, Ferguson’s side became United’s first European champion in 31 years.

By the time United returned to European glory, only Giggs, Scholes, Gary Neville and Wes Brown remained. By 2008, Edwin van der Saar was in goal. Rio Ferdinand, Nemanja Vidic, and Patrice Evra were the stalwarts at the back. Michael Carrick, Owen Hargreaves, Nani and Anderson were the next faces in the middle, faces built around an attack featuring Carlos Tevez, Wayne Rooney, and most importantly, Cristiano Ronaldo. Again, Ferguson had remade his squad, and again, he would be European champions, defeating Chelsea on penalty kicks in Moscow.

Since then, Ferguson’s win three more titles (and appeared in two more Champions League finals), bringing in the foundation of what’s likely to be United’s continued success. The goalkeeping legacy is in good hands with David de Gea. Ferdinand, Vidic, and Evra are still present at the back, but so are Jonny Evans, Phil Jones, Chris Smalling and Rafael. Tom Cleverley’s a regular in midfield, while United continue to amass possess talent wide with Ashley Young, Antonio Valencia, and Nani. And just like his 1999 and 2008 European champions, Ferguson has layers of depth in attack: Robin van Persie, Javier Hernandez, Danny Welback, Shinji Kagawa, and Rooney.

source: ReutersIt’s a wealth of talent that leads some to claim Ferguson’s as much a product of his environment as he is its architect, but nobody truly believes that. As much as Ferguson will be remembered as a man who had resources, he’ll be revered as a manager who used them wisely, his ability to turn over his team while still claiming 13 titles still largely left unexplained.

Along the way, he has had his pitfalls. For brief moments, Arsenal, Chelsea, and Manchester City were able to derail his dominance, the latter benefitting from United’s unfathomable collapse at the end of the 2011-12 season. That same year, United failed to make it out of Champions League’s group stage, leading people to look at Ferguson’s thin-middle preferences and wonder if an ever more midfield-centric world wasn’t passing him by.

Having run away with the Premier League in his final season, Ferguson muffled those critics, and in finally leaving, he does so on top, with a breathtaking list of accomplishments to accompany his regresses into retirement:

1986 – Replaces Ron Atikinson as manager at Manchester United.
1990 – Claims first trophy at United – the 1989-90 FA Cup.
1991 – United claims the UEFA Cup Winners’ Cup, defeating Barcelona 2-1 in Rotterdam. Later in the year, the UEFA Super Cup.
1992 – Ferguson’s first League Cup is his second piece of domestic silverware at United.
1993 – In his fourth year, Ferguson finally breaks through and wins United’s first league title in 26 years.
1994 – United do the league-FA Cup double, their first in club history.
1996 – United again do the league-FA Cup double, claiming their third title in four years.
1997 – Making it four titles in five years, Ferguson again wins back-to-back Premier Leagues.
1999 – For the third time in his tenure, Ferguson wins the league-FA Cup double, only this time, United adds the UEFA Champions League to their trophy haul, winning the “treble.” The Red Devils would go on to win the Intercontinental Cup later in a year Ferguson becomes Sir Alex, knighted by the Queen.
2000 – United wins their sixth title of the Premier League era.
2001 – For the seventh time in nine years, United are champions of England.
2002 – After initially announcing he would retire at the end of the 2001-02 season, Ferguson signs a new deal at Old Trafford. He would manage for 11 more seasons.
2003 – After finishing third the previous season, United reclaims first place, besting Arsenal by five points to claim Ferguson’s eighth title.
2004 – While relinquishing the title, United claim the fifth and final FA Cup of the Ferguson era.
2006 – For the first time in 14 years, United win the League Cup, defeating Wigan Athletic 4-0 in the final.
2007 – After a three-year drought, United win the Premier League, unseating two-time defending champions Chelsea to claim Ferguson’s ninth league title.
2008 – United defend their league tile while claiming the second European Cup of the Ferguson era, defeating Chelsea on penalty kicks in Moscow. They would go on to win the World Club Cup in December.
2009 – For the second time, Ferguson wins three-straight league titles, adding the League Cup. The Red Devils return to the Champions League final only to lose in Rome to Barcelona.
2010 – United makes it back-to-back League Cups, bringing Ferguson’s total to four.
2011 – United reclaim the league title from Chelsea and return to the Champions League final, where they are again defeated by Barcelona, this time in London.
2013 – The Red Devils collect the final trophy of the Alex Ferguson era, clinching the Premier League four rounds before the season’s finale. It’s Ferguson’s 13th league title, bringing his total major trophy haul at United to 28.