German Cup

Bayern Munich wins German Cup
Photo by M. Donato/FC Bayern via Getty Images

Bayern Munich wins record 20th German Cup (video)

Leave a comment

Bayern Munich was hardly bothered in securing a record 20th German Cup via a 4-2 defeat of Bayer Leverkusen in Berlin on Saturday.

The team with the second-most German Cups is Werder Bremen, who has won six times. Bayern has won 10 times this century including the last two.

The Bundesliga champions scored twice in the first half-hour and twice held three-goal leads in what was Bayer’s first German Cup final since a 2009 loss to Bremen.

[ MORE: Latest Bundesliga news ]

David Alaba and Serge Gnabry scored the early goals and Robert Lewandowski scored twice to round out the victor’s scoring.

The first goal of the Polish star’s brace came from a long pass from Manuel Neuer and a shot flubbed by Bayer keeper Lucas Hradecky.

Sven Bender and Kai Havertz scored for Bayer, the latter goal coming deep in stoppage time.

Here’s Alaba’s terrific quickly-taken free kick goal to open the scoring.

Rolfes, Bayer Leverkusen set to meet Bayern in German Cup Final

German Cup Final preview
Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Simon Rolfes’ decorated playing career saw him earn 26 caps with Germany, play 288 times in the Bundesliga, and finish runner-up in both Germany top flight and the German Cup.

[ MORE: Premier League stats ]

Now the sporting director at Bayer Leverkusen, the club he led to the 2009 German Cup Final, Rolfes will hope he’s put together a championship side when Kai Havertz, Leon Bailey, and Bayer meet Bayern Munich in Saturday’s final (2 p.m. ET).

ProSoccerTalk caught up with the former Bayer and Werder Bremen playmaker before the final.

PST: What would a first German Cup in 27 years mean for Leverkusen and also to you as a former player?

Simon Rolfes
Rolfes celebrates after scoring in the 2009 German Cup semi final v. FSV Mainz, on April 21, 2009 (JUERGEN SCHWARZ/DDP/AFP via Getty Images).

Simon Rolfes: It would mean a lot to us. People here in Leverkusen have been waiting for a trophy for a long time. I feel that the organization is ready for a title. We have been working a lot to improve and develop this outstanding club, and the tradition is there. Right now we have a team that has shown its skills on the highest level several times.

PST: What are your top memories of the 2009 German Cup run? Beating Bayern? Scoring in the semifinal? The atmosphere of the final against your former club?

SR: That semifinal against Bayern was very emotional. And then the final in the huge stadium with the crowds was very impressive. I really felt the intensity and the importance of that game. I said to myself that I want to get back to a final soon again. It took some time in the end, and I am in a different role, but here we are now, reaching out for that cup.

PST: That (2009) team was crazy and had some very young talent in Toni Kroos and Arturo Vidal. Are there similarities between that team and the one from today?

SR: I am not one who likes to make comparisons. Each team is unique and has its own personality. But as we did in 2009, we now have a brilliant and talented squad, capable of creating big moments at any time. We’ve showed that throughout the season.

PST: Do you think this Cup final experience can help the club in its pursuit of the Europa League next month?

SR: That’s really hard to predict. It might also depend on the outcome of this game. Anyway, though, all teams will need to adapt to totally new situations in these unprecedented times. We’ll have a full month between the German Cup and the Europa League.

You need to adjust plans for rest as well as for preparation due to earlier or later endings of your domestic season. Whoever hits the right planning will be in a good position to win that Europa League trophy next month.

PST: What’s next for Bayer? What should we be on the look out for?

SR: We don’t see this final berth as a historic moment, at least not in a way of it being a unique and one-off situation. We are ambitious and eager to create more of those title chances in the future. We will continue building up a highly talented and hungry squad for these kind of opportunities. And we are ready to be judged based on the outcome of the games.

How to watch Bayer Leverkusen v. Bayern Munich

What: German Cup Final – Bayer Leverkusen v. Bayern Munich
When: 2 p.m. ET Saturday
TV Channel: ESPN2
Stream: ESPN.com

Bayern holds off Eintracht to reach German Cup Final

Bayern Munich v. Eintracht Frankfurt recap
Photo by M. Donato/FC Bayern via Getty Images
Leave a comment

Robert Lewandowski and Ivan Perisic scored to lift Bayern Munich into the German Cup Final with a 2-1 win over Eintracht Frankfurt at the Allianz Arena on Wednesday.

Bayern meets Bayer Leverkusen in the July 4 final in Berlin. Bayer controlled fourth-tier Saarbrucken in the other semifinal. If Bayern wins its second-straight title it will become the first club to win 20 German Cups.

Danny Da Costa briefly brought Eintracht level, and the club wore #blacklivesmatter on the front of its shirt above a smaller printing of primary sponsor Indeed, the latest in a wide array of anti-racism statements from Bundesliga clubs.

The 31-year-old Lewandowski now has 45 goals in 39 matches this season, while Thomas Muller picked up a career-high 24th assist on Perisic’s goal.

[ MORE: New PL schedule ]

Bayern nearly headed home in the seventh minute off a cross but David Kohr cleared the ball off the line.

Moments later, Thomas Muller slid a ball through the six but it bounded between Robert Lewandowski’s legs in surprising fashion.

Bayern got its goal in the 14th as Muller made the most of a loose ball, chipping to the back post for Perisic’s diving header.

Lewandowski had another miss but not nearly as bad as Kingsley Coman’s failure to slot an Alphonso Davies cross in the 26th.

Eintracht was better in the second half, though Kevin Trapp was called upon to stop Joshua Kimmich in the 58th minute.

The game snapped to life from a dreary spell with Eintracht’s equalizer, Daichi Kamada’s hopeful pass across the 18 meeting fellow sub Da Costa for the equalizer.

Trapp made a strong stop on Muller moments later as Bayern hoped for a quick answer, and they got it in the 75th with help from VAR.

Leon Goretzka laid off for Alphonso Davies, who was initially ruled offside when his pass to Goretzka was slotted home by Lewandowski.

Americans Abroad: Timmy Chandler went 90 minutes at left back, registering a key pass in completing 70 percent of his passes. He completed four of nine long balls, won five of 11 duels, and had three clearances to go with two fouls drawn and committed (SofaScore).

Timothy Chandler Black Lives Matter
USMNT defender Timothy Chandler wearing Eintrach’s special jersey (Photo by Kai Pfaffenbach/Pool via Getty Images)

Demirbay shines as Bayer beats 4th-tier Saarbrucken, reaches cup final

Saarbrucken v. Bayer Leverkusen recap
Photo by Ronald Wittek/Pool via Getty Images
Leave a comment

Kerim Demirbay set up a pair of goals as Bayer Leverkusen ended Saarbrucken’s Cinderella story to advance to the German Cup Final with a 3-0 win at the Hermann-Neuberger-Stadion on Tuesday.

Moussa Diaby, Karim Bellarabi, and Lucas Alario scored for Bayer, who will meet either Bayern Munich of Eintracht Frankfurt at the Olympiastadion in Berlin on July 4.

Saarbrucken hadn’t played in 94 days and is the first fourth-tier side to reach the German Cup semifinal. They knocked off Bundesliga sides Koln and Fortuna Dusseldorf en route to the semifinal, also dismissing Jahn Regensberg and Karlsruher SC.

[ MORE: New PL schedule ]

Bayer had early chances and the ball, with Saarbrucken a lone set piece off a counter attack.

The 11th minute saw the opener as Demirbay popped a terrific ball over the defense for Diaby to finish well inside the near post.

Alario made it 2-0 in the 19th when a mistake in the box allowed the Brazilian to fire into an empty goal from just off the back post.

Demirbay made an unbelievable play to set up the third goal, popping the ball over his defender and sweeping it off the end line for Bellarabi to send home.

[ MORE: The story of Saarbrucken’s amazing cup run ]

Fourth-tier Saarbrucken, Canada’s Froese return to German Cup fairytale

FC Saarbrucken
Photo by Oliver Dietze/picture alliance via Getty Images)
Leave a comment

Three of the four German Cup semifinalists are monsters of the game. Bayern Munich, Borussia Monchengladbach, and Bayer Leverkusen sit first, fourth, and fifth in the Bundesliga.

The fourth semifinalist is also a table-topper; FC Saarbrucken finished in first place in one of five fourth-tier Regionalliga divisions. When it squares off with Bayer Leverkusen on June 9, it’ll do so just started training Thursday and having not played since March 7.

“It is in unbelievable,” says Kianz Froese, the club’s Cuban-Canadian playmaker and a former Vancouver Whitecaps product.

[ MORE: Bundesliga latest news ] 

“We got 9,000 people to our last Pokal game. They sold out tickets right away and people were selling them on the secondhand market for like 1,000 or 2,000 euros. It’s in the blood, It’s in their body, and we have a small stadium. That’s happened multiple times. We have minimum 4,000 fans every game and it’s fourth division.”

Saarbrucken is a city of 200,000 on the French border, closer to Belgium and Luxembourg than Frankfurt.

FC SaarbrĂĽcken is its biggest football club. A member of the inaugural Bundesliga, they were relegated after the 1963-64 season and last played in the top flight during the 1993-94 season. The club has played in the 3.Liga and 2.Bundesliga in this century, but swooned as low as the fifth-tier between 2007-09. It’s expected to play in 3.Liga next season as a promoted side.

Its home, the Hermann Neuberger Stadium, holds less than 7,000 fans and under 600 covered seats. The stadium has come alive this season as Saarbrucken led its division right into the coronavirus pause, though that almost feels secondary to what it’s done in the German Cup, knocking off two 2.Bundesliga sides and top tier clubs Koln and Fortuna Dusseldorf to stand one win away from a final.

“We have a player who played at Real Madrid with some of the superstars and when he talks about it he says it’s a highlight in his career,” Froese said. “Every game was kinda like a final. You’d win and you wouldn’t really believe that you won it. … In the region there’s like a million if you count the outskirts of Saarland. There are many other little teams in the area. But our fan base is very traditional. We have fans who are generation after generation.”

[ BUNDESLIGA: Matchweek 26 preview | Which club to support? ]

Kianz Froese
Froese (2nd from left) drives between DĂĽsseldorf’s Markus Suttner (left) and Zanka (Photo by Oliver Dietze/picture alliance via Getty Images).

As sports around the world waited to hear whether their seasons resumed, Saarbrucken was left to wonder whether it would get the opportunity to chase more history. It was easy to keep perspective. Though undiagnosed, Froese was one of nine players who suffered from COVID-19 symptoms for two weeks.

“For two weeks soon after (the Fortuna game), it was pretty bad I must say. We had all the symptoms. We now get tested every five days,” Froese said. “We all weren’t sure so it was day-by-day but obviously the health of your family and friends and the world is more important. At that stage our focus shifted more to humanitarian thoughts than to sports.”

Now the club has a June 9 date for their test at the hands of Bayer Leverkusen, who will bring Kai Havertz, Leon Bailey, and as many as five more matches of preparation to the field against a Saarbrucken team who may not be able to play a warm-up against anyone other than themselves. They’ve been in small groups at best ahead of their first-team training session Thursday.

“That is a challenge,” Froese said. “We are just training between us. Then we’ll play some games between us again because we can’t have other kinds of opposition I don’t think. We can only train by running and the gym. We won’t have any game rhythm when we go to play them. It’s not going to be easy but it’s doable. It’s not going to be something that’ll be easy.”

[ VIDEO: Premier League highlights ]

Froese’s journey to Die Molschder has been anything but straight-forward. Debuting for the ‘Caps reserves at age 17 and making his first MLS appearance a year later, Froese earned caps for Canada against Ghana and the USMNT in 2015 and 2016, respectively.

After spending most of 2016 in the USL with Vancouver’s reserves, he struck out for Germany (“I was a pro player, I was in MLS, but I didn’t feel like I had chased by dream”). He had trained with German clubs like Mainz and Freiburg when he was younger.

He took a chance with Fortuna Dusseldorf’s second team and secured a pro contract with the first team. Injuries and the first team’s promotion kept him with Dusseldorf II, where he scored 16 times with six assists in parts of three seasons.

Froese’s path to the first team was hurt by Dusseldorf’s promotion to the Bundesliga, so he moved about 300 kilometers south to Saarbrucken.

Friends and family have grown enamored with his club’s incredible season, which took a delirious turn when Froese assisted a goal in regulation and scored in the shootout while his keeper Daniel Batz stopped one penalty in regulation and four more in penalty kicks.

The announcer cried, “David against Goliath, and David’s winning 1-0.” It was stunning stuff, his mother Esperenza getting updates from friends in Cuba as Saarbrucken moved on to the semifinal round with a 1-1 (8-7) win.

[ MORE: Bundesliga transfer targets to watch ]

Froese’s perspective in speaking about his season is incredibly chill. His 10 assists are a career-high and he’s set a German Cup record for most assists by a player outside the Bundesliga, but he’s not terribly concerned about what’s next.

“If a club wants me in a higher division that’s cool, but for me I need to go out and personally enjoy it,” he said. “Because I don’t know if I’m gonna ever play again at this level against such a good opposition, so heavily watched. At the end of the day it’s my journey. It’s just kinda dreamy sometimes but it’s cool.”

Froese constantly mentions how the game goes quickly and chances aren’t guaranteed, referencing the big picture. He was altered by the passing of his father Joe on Sept. 8, 2018, and proudly shared his father’s obituary.

Joe Froese’s tale is a remarkable story that informs Froese’s considerate and deliberate nature in conversation. Joe Froese was “committed to practical ways of promoting environmental sustainability, peace, social justice, and shared wealth.”

The elder Froese bicycled across the U.S. and Canada, wrote a book about Cuba, “was arrested for helping to turn a buffalo loose at a nuclear weapons base in South Dakota, designed and introduced solar ovens for widespread use in Eritrea and Cuba, and participated in post-earthquake housing construction in Nicaragua” (Kianz, for his part, is involved with an organic coffee and condiment farm in Cuba).

“My dad passed away two years ago and from a personal perspective it’s given me an idea of how important it is to enjoy life,” Kianz Froese said, referencing the coronavirus pandemic providing eerie similarities.

“But I had this experience before because I slowly watched the life of my father pass away. Life goes by quite quickly. I knew when I was coming here everyone was going to say, ‘Oh fourth division. That’s not much. blah blah.’ It became less relevant what people thought of me and my personal journey became more relevant. I enjoy playing soccer and being in Europe, learning new languages, and challenging myself. Here is where the best of the best usually are, and I wanted to see where I line up.”

[ MORE: How to watch Bundesliga in the U.S. ]

There’s little doubt that this latest part of his journey is almost too silly for an author working in fiction. Froese’s Saarbrucken have conjured four upsets with the Cuban-Canadian playmaking featuring prominently.

It’s almost too much for the brain to manage in the moment.

“We win these games and we start crying,” he said. “It means a ton to us. I’ve watched the coach cry, I’ve watched every single player cry with me as we all hug each other on the field. These are moments that money can never ever buy and only sports give that.”

He knows the odds are stacked against Saarbrucken when Bayer pays a visit in early June. The lack of preseason alone is a huge ask, not even considering Bayer’s status as a constant European competitor.

So Froese and his team will take it as it comes. For the player, he knows nothing’s guaranteed and that his ride from teen debutant in Vancouver to top assist man in the German Cup has been anything but straight-forward.

“Soccer is a crazy thing,” he said. “Who knows if the club will even offer me a new contract and who knows if somebody else is going to come and sign me? The game is just the game. It’s fast. What are the odds? It’s really hard to say. You’re playing roulette. It’s like walking into a casino and throwing your life on the line and seeing where you land. All you can say is you know you have a family and you love them and we’ll see where it continues. That’s the art of the game.”