Giovanni Reyna

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Watch: Dull US fall to Netherlands, crash out of U-17 World Cup

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The U.S. Under-17 Men’s National Team has been eliminated from the 2019 U-17 World Cup, after losing to the Netherlands 4-0 at the Estadio da Serrinha.

The Stars and Stripes bottomed Group D with a single point, which came from the team’s scoreless draw against Japan. Gianluca Busio’s goal against Senegal was the team’s first and only goal of the tournament. Throughout the span of the tournament, the U.S. conceded five goals.

On Sunday – more than ever before in this tournament – the deficiencies of the U.S. were on full displayed. The Netherland’s Sontje Hansen ripped the backline apart, scoring twice and assisting on one occasion. Jayden Braaf added a well-earned fourth for the European side. When in the attack, the U.S. relied on their go-to: Giovanni Reyna. The Borussia Dortmund player had a couple of scoring chances, including a close-range header that went inches wide in the seventh minute.

Raphaël Wicky, who boasted a squad with plethora of players playing abroad and for first teams in MLS, like Reyna, Chituru Odunze, Busio, and George Bello, among others, has serious questions to answer following three-and-out showing from a highly-touted American side.

Watch the video highlights of the match below:

 

Lackluster U.S. draws Japan, U-17 World Cup hopes in jeopardy

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The United States’ U-17 World Cup hopes are in serious trouble of dying at the group stage.

Raphael Wicky’s Baby Yanks have just one point after two matches following a 0-0 draw with Japan in Cariacica, Brazil, with Leicester City goalkeeper Chituru Odunze saving the point with a magnificent late save.

The point keeps the U.S. above pointless Netherlands, who it faces Saturday in Goiânia. A win would be enough to send the U.S. through as a third-place into the knockout rounds, and a draw could be enough, too.

Senegal is now 2-0 after beating the Dutch, who also lost to Japan.

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Ex-Basel manager Wicky stunned many when he left Borussia Dortmund starlet Giovanni Reyna on the bench for the first hour.

Gianluca Busio (Sporting KC) showed first half flashes though perhaps tried to do too much to enliven a lackluster first half for both sides.

Ricardo Pepi (FC Dallas) had the ball in the net when he was on the spot for a rebound, but his sheepish reaction beat the linesman’s flag to announcing his offside.

Pepi came off in the 55th minute for Giovanni Reyna, a surprise scratch from the Starting XI.

All of the action in the first hour belonged to the Baby Yanks, but Japan awoke and took hold of the match.

Jun Nishikawa just missed the bar with an inspired effort, then later turned and fired but missed the near post as Japan threatened to take all three points.

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Reyna tried his luck at catching the keeper off his line in the 72nd minute, but a long free kick effort sailed over the cross bar.

The U.S. then needed a bail out when Odunze made an incredible close range save in the 74th.

Joe Scally (NYCFC) had some good moments and redirected an 84th minute free kick away from danger.

Reyna nearly dribbled the entire left side of the Japan defense to score in the 85th, but saw his shot partially blocked.

Odunze made a fantastic save in stoppage time on Yamato Wakatsuki to preserve the point.

Watch: U.S. U-17 MNT fall to Senegal in World Cup opener

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The U.S. Under-17 Men’s National Team came out firing in their 2019 World Cup opener against Senegal, as Sporting Kansas City’s Gianluca Busio put the Stars and Stripes up a goal only three minutes into Sunday’s bout.

That spark, the hunger and, most importantly, the lead wouldn’t hold up until the final whistle, however. With three goals in the second half, Senegal stunned Raphaël Wicky’s side 4-1 at the Estádio Kléber Andrade.

Whether it was due to the U.S. resting on their laurels or lacking luck, the second half was shockingly poor from the Concacaf side, especially when defending. Two of final three goals scored by Senegal came from second-chance opportunities. Senegal’s fourth came via a direct free-kick, highlighting the U.S.’ inability to keep the opposing side at bay.

Up next for Giovanni Reyna and company is Japan midweek in what will be a must-win for the Americans.

Watch the video highlights of the match below:

Giovanni Reyna, United States begin U-17 World Cup run

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The U-17 World Cup began Saturday in Brazil, with the next generation of world stars taking the stage.

All eight teams to play scored, with Brazil’s Joao Peglow (Internacional) and Nigeria’s Samson Tijani accounting for two goals each.

The United States begins its run on Sunday with a 4 p.m. ET kickoff in Cariacica against Senegal, one of three tricky opponents in Group D with Japan and the Netherlands.

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Raphael Wicky’s U.S. roster has a clear standout in Borussia Dortmund’s Giovanni Reyna, the son of legendary USMNT midfielder Claudio Reyna.

Giovanni is one of four Europe-based players on the squad, joined by Fulham goalkeeper Damians Las, Leicester goalkeeper Chituru Odunze, and Freiburg mid Maximillian Dietz.

Gianluca Busio of Sporting KC is an exciting player to watch with plenty of first team experience, and Griffin Yow (DC United), Sebastian Anderson (Colorado Rapids), and Ricardo Pepi (FC Dallas) also have broken into their MLS sides.

New York City FC has put three players on the roster, matching Seattle Sounders for the most.

The U.S. is joined as a CONCACAF entrant by Canada, Haiti and Mexico. The Canadians lost 4-1 to hosts Brazil while Haiti starts play Sunday v. South Korea and Mexico begins Monday versus Paraguay.

Saturday’s U-17 World Cup results

Nigeria 4-2 Hungary
New Zealand 1-2 Angola
Brazil 4-1 Canada
Ecuador 2-1 Australia

Sunday’s U-17 World Cup fixtures

France v. Chile — 4 p.m. ET
U.S. v. Senegal — 4 p.m. ET
Japan v. Netherlands — 7 p.m. ET
South Korea v. Haiti — 7 p.m. ET

NYCFC’s Reyna on building ‘inspirational pathway’ for youth

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When it comes to American soccer, there are few fonts of wisdom as well-earned as Claudio Reyna.

Before he was New York City FC’s sporting director, the New Jersey-born midfielder did just about everything possible for a player of his era en route to becoming a USMNT centurion (112 caps, to be exact).

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Reyna played for Bruce Arena at the University of Virginia, where he won the Hermann Trophy as the best player in college soccer. He left for Europe following the 1994 World Cup, embarking on a 14-year career in Germany (Bayer Leverkusen and Wolfsburg), Scotland (Rangers), England (Sunderland and Manchester City), and the U.S. (New York Red Bulls).

Now closer to home with NYCFC, where he’s helped build the East’s No. 1 seed in these MLS Cup Playoffs, Reyna is constructing a giant of American soccer. We spoke with Reyna about the status of youth soccer, scouting the globe, his NYCFC heading into the playoffs, and a United States U-17 World Cup roster which includes his son Giovanni (Borussia Dortmund) as well as several NYCFC players.

NYCFC has also used its resources to build 50 public soccer pitches around the metropolitan area. The club is on track to have 30 finished by the end of this calendar year, which is where we started a wonderful conversation with the living USMNT legend.

ProSoccerTalk: Considering the many facets involved with a project like this, bureaucracy, red tape, community challenges, how heavy of a lift was this and how rewarding is it to see it moving toward completion?

(Photo by Anthony J. Causi)

Claudio Reyna: “It certainly is a heavy lift but it’s not just NYCFC. It was a partnership with adidas, Etihad, the Mayor’s Fund, and U.S. Soccer Foundation. They certainly helped in getting this off the ground, on time and on budget. We still have more until we complete the 50. We wouldn’t be able to do it without the team effort but it was a lot of heavy lifting and coordinating of people’s schedules. It’s very rewarding and satisfying when you see the pitches bringing communities together and having kids playing unstructured, fun soccer, all kinds of ages coming together. To have that space and creativity to have fun and play soccer.”

PST: How important is it that young players are competing in free-flowing games, trying new things, and techniques? And how can you help maximize their use?

Reyna: “Within the community they know the pitches are there, and word will continue to spread. But it’s important to leave a legacy and give something that really does so much to a community. It’s not about developing soccer players — it certainly helps the sport grow and get visibility — but in urban areas there is limited park space and just in general it’s difficult to get out and play and exercise. It’s attractive, these blue pitches. It’s all these players, their stadium.

It’s a magical place for them to go and they’ll never forget that. It’s that spark for kids. It brings people together like it does at all levels.

“That’s what we’re most proud of, all the partners are. You continue to change lives, and we’re certain that’s going to happen. It’s one of the best projects that we’ve had, and it’s something you can see with your eyes the impact that it’s making.”

PST: Looking at soccer here on the whole, there have been magnificent strides in the past 10-15 years. What’s your status report of the youth game here in our country at this point?

Reyna: It’s good but we’re not anywhere near the best leagues and soccer nations in the world. In terms of investment and facilities, level of coaching, and level of players coming through the academies is much better than in years past, but every club is at a different place and different environment. You have to understand your market and your areas.

“We are fortunate that we have a rich talent pool of players, but we have to take them in and teach them about life first, that’s a big thing for us in character traits, make sure they are respectful to the team and wearing the jerseys. At our academy we’re focused on pushing players and when it gets too easy, we move them up. When we feel a player is ready for the first team, we push them up.

“Despite winning the last two U-19 national championships, we’re always focused on the long-term development of players. We won last year with very young teams, so that speaks to what we believe in. We have four Homegrown Players, and there will be more in the future. There’s that inspirational pathway, a really good pipeline where they see the first team.

My path was a bit unclear for me. I didn’t dream of playing professional soccer at 10, 11 because there’s no league. But now a kid goes to our stadium, to our academy, he sees a local kid make it, and knows he can be the next one.”

PST: What are the biggest challenges for your academy in bringing in young players for the first time?

Reyna: “We have many players that come with a very good background, and we’ve made a lot of efforts in partnering with local clubs. We start bringing the players in at 10, 11 years old. Before that they have a different development and understanding.

“We have to bring down some habits because the kids who come to us are the best players on their other teams and they get away with more than they will when they come to another level. We focus on breaking habits. We believe in a collective game where everyone needs to play and be comfortable on the ball.

“The first year we may have to shift players around because what you find is when the best players come to us, most were center forwards, center midfielders, central defenders. You have to say, okay, this player’s good but his long-term potential is a right back.

“The perfect example is Joe Scally on the U-17 World Cup team. He came to us from a club in Long Island as an athletic box-to-box midfielder. He was very strong, but we saw him as an outside back. The lesson that we now we share that with our players, don’t get upset if you move to a position, but Joe Scally understood, never complained, he played wherever he was told to do, and now he’s a right back now, 16 years old going to the World Cup after being in our academy for two and a half years.

“Players who buy in like that, and Joe, Justin Haak, and James (Sands), they tend to have more success. In New York we continue to work with local clubs like NYSC and Met Oval and a lot of smaller clubs around the NY area have helped us produce players who come with a good foundation and good base.”

PST: I wanted to ask you about the U-17 World Cup. Obviously your son being on the team has to make it an incredibly emotional thing, but to have have three academy players in the fold, too, man… that must be a sensational feeling.

Giovanni Reyna with Borussia Dortmund first team head coach Lucien Favre(Photo by TF-Images/Getty Images)

Reyna: And a coach, too (NYCFC academy coach Matt Pilkington is an assistant on the squad). It’s very special. My son, obviously, it’s a very proud moment for him to be able to compete in a World Cup. But for me, I’ve known these kids since they were 10 years old. When I see them run out, it’s kinda like “Whoa,” I remember them hanging out at 11, 12, 13. It’s really great to see.

“Then again it’s a credit to what we do here. We prepare players for the next level. That’s what an academy is. You’re not there to win academy games. You’re there to prepare them for the next level. These guys are mature. They are winners. They have a winning mentality that has translated to this team. I’m definitely get down, and go back and forth because of the playoffs, it’s super exciting for me. Very emotional as well. I love them like they’re my own kids.

PST: And one of them is.

Reyna: (laughs) One of them is.

PST: I wanted to ask you about the first team. I’m thinking of Alexandru Mitrita of Romania (who came from Universitatea Craiova) and Ismael Tajouri-Shradi of Libya (Austria Wien), and how you’ve found players from everywhere. Obviously there are thousands of hours of video on massive leagues, but how do you judge whether players from “smaller” places can get the job done for NYCFC in MLS?

Reyna: “I believe there are players everywhere in this world. Anyone who doesn’t understand this, they’re behind. The first thing is, really, how bad do they want to come here. Why do you want to come here? The players we’re recruiting, why New York? Why MLS? Why now in your career? You get a straight answer and a feeling, because from then on you can always go back to that.

“I’m very open about how we work and how we play and the expectation of a very high standard of professionalism. Ultimately for them, it’s important to say if you do really well, there’s another step for you. Like Jack Harrison. You’ve gotta be honest about the league, the competition, the travel, different conditions and climate. You’ve gotta give them the picture. Prior to that you see the player play. It’s the eyes, ears, and then the data after that.

“The data is there to support the decision, not drive the decision. These are human beings with emotions. Alexandru is the perfect example. At the beginning of the year he was alone waiting for his fiancee — now his wife — to come, and I knew besides other things and adaptation, that’s why he wasn’t yet where he was going to be (on the field). Not everyone sees that, the fans don’t see that. Then you see him with his wife, and his family, and he’s got a big smile on his face, and data’s not picking that up.

“You have to look at all these things, so we make a big effort to make sure we help them settle in. A player who feels welcome, will give 100 percent back. If a player doesn’t work out, I look at ourselves first. Too often, clubs and coaches and supporters blame the player. It’s my responsibility to say what could we have done better. They are human beings first. I will never turn my back on a certain league. There’s a very good generation coming through, look at the U-21s this summer. Our squad, the players fight, they wanna be here, and now the players are playing as hard as they can for the jersey.”

PST: You look at NYCFC’s place in the stats this season, and it follows suit with what you’re saying that the club is at or near the top of the league in a lot of the desire stats.

Reyna: “The coaching staff deserves a lot of credit. Stats are important. I asked a colleague to compare them to years past, and it gives you so much information. The difference between when I played and players today is they like this, they want to see it, and we didn’t have it growing up. It’s another way to learn. They want to see how goals are scored, how they are given up, whether they are in transition or whatever. Set pieces for us was something we wanted to see how we could get better. The stats gave us a clearer picture of what we’re doing well. After every game we get a review of what we did, and I look at everything because a stat can show you something you might not have seen with your eyes during the game.”