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Dynamo, Dash reschedule weekend games due to Hurricane Harvey

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Ahead of the impending landfall of Hurricane Harvey, the Houston Dynamo and Houston Dash have both rescheduled matches that were set to take place this weekend.

Hurricane Harvey is reportedly bringing upwards of three feet of rain and heavy winds to the Southeast Texas area, and travel around Houston and areas along the Gulf Coast are expected to be difficult.

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“Under the circumstances, the clear and obvious decision is to reschedule these matches. The most important thing is the safety of our community,” said Dynamo and Dash president Chris Canetti. “I appreciate the support of MLS, NWSL, Sporting Kansas City and the North Carolina Courage in working through this difficult situation with us. On behalf of the Dynamo, Dash and BBVA Compass Stadium, we wish for everyone’s utmost safety and security throughout the storm.”

The Dynamo were set to take on Sporting KC while the Dash were to face the North Carolina Courage. The Dynamo’s match has been rescheduled to October 11. There’s no rescheduled date for the Dash’s match.

Houston Dynamo accepting refundable deposits for potential NWSL expansion team, and why it’s a no-brainer for the league

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Late last fall, U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati revealed the then-debuting National Women’s Soccer League was unlikely to expand for the 2014 season. The same eight teams which began the latest attempt at North American women’s professional soccer would continue carrying the torch in year two. With rumored interest from multiple Major League Soccer teams having persisted throughout the season, the decision was looked at by some as a missed opportunity, by most as opting toward stability. Regardless, the issue was thought to be settled, for now.

But that ‘now’ lasted far shorter than expected thanks to Chris Canetti, the president of MLS’s Houston Dynamo. This week, Canetti confirmed Houston’s interest in emulating the Portland Timbers and starting a sister team in the NWSL. Today, the Dynamo executive took another step, taking to his Twitter account to announce the team was ready to start gauging interest:

[tweet https://twitter.com/ChrisCanetti/status/403657526282973184 width=450 align=center] [tweet https://twitter.com/ChrisCanetti/status/403657639176859648 width=450 align=center]

Canetti went on to say the deposit is only $25 per ticket, the team presumed to be playing at BBVA Compass Stadium, home of the Dynamo. The league’s ninth franchise would also be its most southern geographically, with the league’s only other team outside the country’s northern half being FC Kansas City.

But what of Gulati’s declaration about expansion? The league’s stance now seems to be a never say never policy. If an opportunity like Houston came up — a stable organization that presents a unique opportunity to add another MLS partner — why would you say no? Portland was by far and away the league’s most successful franchise last season (not only winning the league title but drawing 13,320 per game), largely because they were able to build on the foundation laid by the Timbers. Who wouldn’t want another team that could utilize that recipe?

Of course, that’s what people were asking last season. The general response: Stability was more important, a view that didn’t quite make sense. If the goal is to establish a league that can survive the dreaded three-year curse (WUSA and WPS never playing a fourth season), why wouldn’t you want a partner that’s unlike to fold any time soon? Whereas multiple NWSL teams are struggling to prove their semi-pro viability can translate to professional stability, a organization like the Dynamo would strengthen the ranks. More teams with a better chance at long-term survival shouldn’t be ignored in favor of year-to-year consistency.

There are a number of players overseas looking for opportunities at home, whether you’re talking about U.S. national team-caliber players like Christen Press or Meghan Klingenberg or the myriad journey-women players hopping around, trying to make a living. With the popularity of women’s college soccer, the NCAA ranks are producing enough players to stock these teams. And with a lower salary base augmented by subsidies from U.S. and Canadian soccer, it’s not hard to take a franchise from zero to playing in a few months times.

At one point, though, those subsidies are going to go away. It may happen after the 2016 Summer Olympics. Right now, this league wouldn’t survive without the federations paying for each squad’s best talent. If there were more teams like the Portland Thorns, however, the NWSL would have a better chance at survival come 2017.

The big question is whether Houston would be in it for the long run, but that’s what this test is about. If the Dynamo get enough commitments to mitigate the costs of running the team, it sounds like they’ll push forward. We’ll get a chance to see if Texas is truly ready for women’s professional soccer.

And if the response is light? The NWSL gets that low-risk, low-reward consistency people seemed to want.

Houston-Kansas City Man of the Match: Sporting’s Aurélien Collin

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A Man of the Match is often defined by the player who can cease a moment and turn a game in his team’s favor, but in a two-legged tie, teams often decline to create such moments over the first 90 minutes. They those as the first half of a 180-minute game, and as such, they’re unwilling to embrace the risks are entailed with pressing for a result. On Saturday, with both Houston and Sporting Kansas City playing on two days’ rest, there were no legs to pursue glory, leaving few individuals who stood out.

But in a match that became about preserving the status quo, the man who did the most to that end was Aurélien Collin, whose clean up work at the back was crucial to Kansas City’s ability to keep a clean sheet. Whereas the French defender make his mark in attack in the postseason’s first two games (scoring in each leg against New England), today he did so at the back, posting match highs in tackles (five) and clearances (20).

They’re numbers which describe what was at times a commanding performance. With Houston pumping in 15 crosses (to Kansas City’s eight), Collin’s aerial presence helped diffuse any drama before it started, with the Dynamo only able to muster three shots on target. Collin won seven duels and was key to making sure the great service Cam Weaver saw early in the second half never troubled Jimmy Nielsen.

It wasn’t a perfect performance, but even when Collin make mistakes, he made the right decisions to mitigate his errors. In the 53rd minute, Collin was nearly beaten wide down Houston’s left just outside the penalty area, but he elected to take down Omar Cummings rather than let the Dynamo attacker have his choice of targets from the byline. It was Collin’s worst moment of the match, but even then, he made sure it didn’t hurt Sporting.

He wasn’t the only standout of the day, and depending on how you feel about Collin, Oriol Rosell or Matt Besler may have looked better. Collin, now in his third year in Major League Soccer, has a style of play many will never grow to love.

Yet Saturday was a reminder that when you take away the physicality and league-leading number of yellow cards, the 27-year-old is one of the best defenders in Major League Soccer. And after one leg in Houston, he’s one of the main reasons it’s still 0-0 going back to Kansas City.

Houston scores late to draw with New York Red Bulls, 2-2

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HOUSTON – The New York Red Bulls took command early, but then collapsed beneath the weight of a red card and a motivated second half effort from the home team Sunday, drawing with Houston at BBVA Compass Stadium, 2-2.

Houston rallied for two second half goals, including one in stoppage time, erasing a big first half from the visiting Red Bulls, thus sending the teams’ home-and-away series back up to New York tied on totals goals.

Omar Cummings finished a stoppage time scramble in front of New York’s goal for the late equalizer. Dynamo teammates Ricardo Clark had cut New York’s lead in half with a deflected 52nd-minute shot.

The match really turned 13 minutes later when Red Bulls center back Jamison Olave was shown a straight red for a bad tackle on Cummings. Thus, he will miss the return leg Wednesday at Red Bull Arena.

(MORE: Man of the Match, New York’s Tim Cahill)

The Red Bulls, who were rolling so mightily, with so much authority and swagger through the final weeks of Major League Soccer’s regular season, appeared ready to do the same in the playoffs. If there was any doubt about whether Mike Petke’s team, the 2013 Supporters Shield winners, would forfeit some of that confidence and form once into the post-season, the visitors had removed all doubt within half an hour.

Tim Cahill’s header off Thierry Henry’s swell assist got things going, and by the time Eric Alexander turned and fired into the near post after 30 minutes, the Red Bulls seemed well in control of the Eastern Conference semifinal first leg.

But things changed in the second half, and especially so after Olave’s 65th minute ejection. Houston had all the momentum from there.

Petke’s team looked quite dangerous from the start, sitting back and not really even trying to play with much possession on Houston’s small field. It worked perfectly as Henry got isolated along the left side. His nifty little turn created enough room for a centering ball, which Cahill turned into his first MLS playoff goal on an unchallenged header.

Yes, an unchallenged header; this year’s Dynamo defense just hasn’t been the classic, tough unit to score against we are so used to seeing from Dominic Kinnear clubs.

The defending was sloppy once again as Alexander got free down the right, the finishing touches of yet another quick thrust from the visitors. He turned on Eric Brunner and beat Houston ‘keeper Tally Hall – who didn’t look good on either New York goal – to the near post.

Houston had just a series of half-chances in the opening half before Will Bruin took Boniek Garcia’s sweet little release into the penalty area, pulled it around one defender to create some shooting space … but then hit his lightly contested shot well over New York goal from about 15 yards just before the break.

Houston was much stronger to start the second half, and Clark needed just six minutes to take advantage for David Carney’s awful clearance. Carney ”cleared” a ball from the wing into the middle of the field, where Clark gathered near the top of the penalty area and then saw his deflected shot beat a stranded Luis Robles. That cut the New York lead to 2-1.

New York had lost the initiative when Olave, so commanding at center back when he can stay on the field, when he is not dealing with injuries or suspensions, left his team a man down for 25 minutes.

The ball was nowhere nearby when Olave launched his dangerous tackle from behind on Cummings. Referee Ricardo Salazar was quickly on scene with red card in hand.

Cummings’ late equalizer came after a corner kick, which the Red Bulls failed to clear initially.

Kinnear, suspended but watching from a suite, used a lineup unchanged from the 11 that made easy work of Montreal in a mid-week elimination match.

Lineups

Houston Dynamo: Tally Hall, Kofi Sarkodie, Eric Brunner, Bobby Boswell, Corey Ashe; Oscar Boniek Garcia, Warren Creavalle, Ricardo Clark, Brad Davis; Will Bruin, Giles Barnes.

New York Red Bulls: Luis Robles, Markus Holgersson, Ibrahim Sekagya, David Carney, Eric Alexander, Dax McCarty, Jonathan Steele, Peguy Luyidula; Thierry Henry, Tim Cahill

MLS suspends Kinnear for Sunday playoff game; Di Vaio, Romero get extended bans

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Marco Di Vaio and Andrés Romero earned additional two-game suspensions for last night actions in Houston, but it’s a suspension to a non-player that was the bigger news out of New York on Friday. Late evening Eastern time, Major League Soccer announced that its Disciplinary Committee had handed a one-match suspension to Dynamo head coach Dominic Kinnear, who will miss his team’s Sunday’s Eastern Conference semifinal opener against the New York Red Bulls.

Kinnear was handed the ban for leaving his technical area and entering the field of play in the 89th minute, a letter-of-the-law violation that overlooks the circumstances of his infraction. Kinnear’s entry onto the field came after Kofie Sarkodie was shoved to the ground by Romero, who was subsequently sent off for violent conduct. Kinnear appeared to be placating defender Corey Ashe as the melee wore down, a benevolent act that still violated the rules. On Sunday, he won’t be allowed on the sidelines or in the locker room as Houston hosts the Supporters’ Shield winners.

source: AP
Dom Kinnear left his technical area during Thursday’s confrontation. MLS has suspended the Dynamo boss for Sunday’s match against New York. (Photo: AP Photo.)

How much of an impact this has on the result will depend on Houston’s adjustments, but given the way Kinnear has steered his team through the last two postseasons, his absence could have a major impact, depending on how the game plays out. If everything goes to the team’s pre game plans, it may not matter. If New York jumps on Houston and the Dynamo need to adjust? They’ll have to do so without the two-time MLS Cup-winning coach.

On the other side, both Romero and Di Vaio had two games tacked on their their violent conduct, suspension they’ll start serving next March. After shoving Sarkodie to the ground, Romero violently kicked at the ball underneath the Dynamo defender. Di Vaio, Montréal’s first player on the seen, was also dismissed, multiple times appearing to scratch Ashe along the side of his face.

Nobody’s going to think twice about those bans, given how things ended last night in Houston. Kinnear’s absence, however, is sure to be discussed throughout the weekend. Houston will have to get by without him.