Jordi Roura

In their words: Reaction to Bayern Munich’s rout of Barcelona

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“I am happy about the result, but I am not moved by it. I know that we still face 90 very difficult minutes in Spain. We will enjoy what happened tonight, but not more.” – Jupp Heynckes, head coach, Bayern Munich, via UEFA.com

“We have been displaying extraordinary football for the entire season now. Falling short of success in the past two years has only made them more hungry to win this year … Today’s game was a perfect .” – Heynckes, via UEFA.com

“Bayern played a great game while we were lacking that freshness to compete with them and that is something that we have to look at. We didn’t see situations where we could have changed things after the break.” – Jordi Roura, assistant coach, Barcelona, via UEFA.com

“Bayern have to be congratulated. They were very strong; they are a very physical team. We didn’t play all that badly in the first half but then they scored quite early in the second from a strategic move and from there it was difficult.” – Roura, via UEFA.com

[MORE: Bayern trounce Barcelona. | Highlights ]

“We felt comfortable despite having to run a lot during the game, Barcelona make you do that. If it were against any other team you might feel confident [going into the second leg], but this is Barça; they beat AC Milan by 4-0 in a previous round.” – Javi Martinez, midfielder, Bayern Munich, via UEFA.com

“We’ve played a lot of good games this season so I’m not sure if this is the best. We knew how to play against Barcelona tonight. They had very few chances while we controlled the midfield and prevented them from moving the ball around. We took advantage of dead ball situations.” – Martinez, via UEFA.Com

“Of course I can comprehend what happened today! We have the potential to beat any team. It is a well known fact that Barcelona have problems in the air. Our defensive performance was close to perfection, that was the key to our success today.” – Philipp Lahm, defender/captain, Bayern Munich, via UEFA.com

“To get such a result, we knew we had to run and press together a lot. Apart from that, we knew we had a striker who could score. We are very happy.” – Franck Ribery, winger, Bayern Munich, via UEFA.com

“[Barcelona] have dominated Europe for the last five years so to beat them like that, it makes you proud … We played a perfect game. We fought for every metre. We didn’t give them any space to play, and they only had one or two chances all night.”Arjen Robben, winger, Bayern Munich, via UEFA.com

“We played fantastic today. I have never experienced a night like this and I have been around for quite some time now. I think we all saw that [Lionel] Messi was not fully fit. We have a very good chance to reach the final now.” – Karl-Heinz Rummenigge, chairman, Bayern Munich, via UEFA.com

“Referee mistake in first three Bayern goals? there have been mistakes in our last three CL away games, but tonight it’s no excuse.” Roura, via @barcastuff

“We fell today against a great team like Bayern. We’ll get up as soon as possible. Hugs to all.” – Victor Valdes, goalkeeper, Barcelona, via @1victorvaldes

“Referee mistakes led to first 3 goals of Bayern? We can’t talk about the referee, Bayern were just better.” – Gerard Piqué, defender, Barcelona, via @barcastuff

“Bayern were the better team, stronger, faster. This is almost impossible to turn around.” –  Piqué, via @barcastuff

“No changes until late in the game? We didn’t see things clear, thought the players who were there could still score.” – Roura, via @barcastuff

“Tie isn’t over yet. As long is it possible, we’ll keep on trying. There are 90 minutes at the Camp Nou left, they can be very long.” – Dani Alves, right back, Barcelona, via @barcastuff

“If your opponent is better than you, you can only congratulate them. Bayern are the strongest team I’ve faced in a long time.” – Alves, @barcastuff

“Call Pep? Please respect me, I don’t need to call anyone.” –  Heynckes, via @KayLMurray

Where they stand: Bayern Munich and the UEFA Champions League quarterfinals

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With UEFA Champions League quarterfinals over, it’s time to take inventory of what we’ve learned about the teams that comprise one of the more competitive semifinal quartets in recent memory. In our second stop, we consider the team that’s positioning themselves as the favorites: Bayern Munich.

At some point, Bayern Munich’s going to have to break out of their jog. The ease with which they defused Arsenal at the Emirates meant that round’s only drama came in its last few moments, and against Juventus, Bayern was never threatened. Maybe they’re so good they can trot to this year’s title, but in all likelihood, they’re going to be tested.

That’s the lens through which we’re evaluating Bayern. Yes, they look good, and yes, they’re probably the favorites, but where are the cracks? What are the points Jurgen Klopp, José Mourinho, and Jordi Roura can exploit to send the Bavarians crashing?

Here’s what we found out:

  • Attack: The loss of Toni Kroos means that Thömas Müller will play through the middle while Arjen Robben starts wide. Can Müller be the orchestrator Bayern may need over the next three games? And will Robben been good Arjen? Or bizarro, make sure the people in the 16th row are wearing helmets, Robben?
  • Defense: Bayern’s only allowed 13 goals in 24 Bundesliga matches, but that ratio has increased to 10 in 10 in Champions League. While that’s still an impressive total, detractors can look at a group that included BATE, Lille, and Valencia and wonder how much FCB were tested. Against Juventus they kept two clean sheets, but against Arsenal in the Round of 16, Bayern conceded three times. Nobody’s expecting a complete breach of their defenses, but against the attacks present in the semifinals, Bayern’s defensive record may not hold up.
  • And beyond: This is where the acquisition of Javi Martínez is supposed to pay off. His ability on the ball, value bursting forward, and defender’s presence at the base of midfield gives Bayern a dimension they lacked in their last two finals runs. The question is whether those qualities will come through in this packed final four.
  • Preferred matchups: Nobody should scare Bayern, but Barcelona represents an unknown. Whereas they have Dortmund’s number and beat Real Madrid in last year’s semifinals, this core hasn’t faced Barcelona. FCB may prefer to take embrace what they know and get Dortmund in the semifinals, Real Madrid in the final.
Where they stand …
Barcelona Bayern Munich Borussia Dortmund Real Madrid

Important dates

Friday, April 12 – Semifinal matchups drawn
Tuesday, April 23 – Leg one, semifinal one
Wednesday, April 24 – Leg one, semifinal two
Tuesday, April 30 – Leg two, semifinal two
Wednesday, May 1 – Leg two, semifinal one
Saturday, May 25 – Final (London)

Where they stand: Barcelona and the UEFA Champions League quarterfinals

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With UEFA Champions League quarterfinals over, it’s time to take inventory of what we’ve learned about the teams that comprise one of the more competitive semifinal quartets in recent memory. We start with Barcelona … because of the alphabet.

Borussia Dortmund needed the heroics, but based on final scores, Barcelona was the semifinalist closest to leaving the competition in the quarterfinal round. Thanks to a late Wednesday goal from Pedro Rodríguez, Barça makes their sixth straight semifinal (a tournament record), even though for most of the match at the Nou Camp, the Blaugrana were on the wrong end of scoring chances.

But Paris Saint-Germain are gone. So are the matchup problems and the array of the injury concerns that dogged Jordi Roura’s squad during the second leg. Now they can move on to the semifinals.

Here’s what we know:

  • Attack: While it’s becoming easier for top teams to contain Barcelona’s attack, there are still two worrisome elements. First, Messi’s best can’t be stopped, putting you at his mercy. Second, unless you’re Real Madrid, you have to concede a lot of possession to implement the plan that’s most likely to succeed. That’s a problem for Bayern, though Dortmund can try the counterattack-heavy approach that was so successful last year against München (even if they’ll miss Shinji Kagawa while doing so).
  • Defense: If Carles Puyol’s back for the semifinal, it will difficult to make any judgments from the quarters into the next round. If he isn’t, Gerard Piqué becomes even more important. He was strong over two legs against PSG, but against talented attacks in the semifinals, Javier Mascherano’s absence could be felt.
  • And beyond: Barcelona’s difficult to analyze because we’re used to possession being a strong harbinger of goals. But against the better teams in Europe, Barcelona’s possession represents a compromise. Teams are willing to concede a little more of the ball in exchange for security at the back knowing their counter attack’s bound to be their most dangerous weapon. While their dominance of the possession gives the impression Barcelona can determine their own destiny, this year may be the first in five where “the field” may be a better bet than the Blaugrana.
  • Preferred matchups: The one team Barcelona will want to avoid is Real Madrid, a team that’s slowly developed a team to beat Barça. Bayern Munich being Europe’s best (at the moment), Barça should hope to take their chances in a one-off against München while drawing Dortmund over two legs.
Where they stand …
Barcelona Bayern Munich Borussia Dortmund Real Madrid

Important dates

Friday, April 12 – Semifinal matchups drawn
Tuesday, April 23 – Leg one, semifinal one
Wednesday, April 24 – Leg one, semifinal two
Tuesday, April 30 – Leg two, semifinal two
Wednesday, May 1 – Leg two, semifinal one
Saturday, May 25 – Final (London)