Josh Wolff

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Report: Austin FC hire Reyna as sporting director

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Months after locking in Josh Wolff as head coach, Austin FC is reportedly on the verge of naming one of MLS’ best sporting directors to the same role.

The Athletic reported on Wednesday that Anthony Precourt’s Austin FC has hired Claudio Reyna from New York City FC to be the expansion club’s new sporting director. It’s the second expansion club that Reyna is working for since he joined NYCFC in 2013 as its first director of soccer operations.

[READ: MLS takes big step with All-Star game update]

If true, it’s a shrewd move by Precourt to bring in a man who knows MLS like the back of his thumb, and to pair him with a former teammate from the U.S. Men’s National Team. Wolff’s spent almost his entire career in professional soccer in MLS too, so the club now has two influential individuals who are knowledgable about the league and it’s various roster mechanisms.

Austin FC doesn’t enter MLS until 2021, so locking in Reyna now gives him more than a year of runway towards building an MLS-ready roster. Precourt has surely seen the best-case scenario – Seattle, Los Angeles FC, Atlanta United – where a team loaded with top-heavy talent and good role players can make a deep playoff run in its expansion season. But he’s likely also seen the worst-case scenarios – look at Minnesota United in the past and FC Cincinnati this year.

Bringing in Reyna certainly makes it more likely that Austin FC’s future will lie in the former category.

MLS expansion side Austin FC name Wolff as first-ever head coach

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Former USMNT forward  Josh Wolff has become the first-ever head coach of Austin FC, as the MLS expansion franchise crack on with their expected entry into North America’s top-flight in 2021.

Wolff, 42, was the assistant coach for D.C. United before moving to the Columbus Crew were he worked as Gregg Berhalter’s assistant for the past five years. Wolff was then hired as Berhalter’s assistant when he took charge of the USMNT.

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Austin FC say that Wolff will start his new job after the international window in November as he will continue with his current job with U.S. Soccer until then.

“I know that Austin has a true love of soccer, and it is the opportunity of a lifetime to be part of the first ever major league team of any kind in the Capital of Texas,” Wolff said. “Our stated ambition is to establish ourselves quickly within MLS as a vibrant, attacking side and we want to reflect the diverse, competitive, and passionate makeup of our club’s home, both on and off the field.”

This move makes total sense as former Columbus Crew owner, Anthony Precourt, knows Wolff from their time together in Ohio. Precourt excercized his option to move his MLS franchise from Columbus to Austin which was confirmed in January 2019.

The Crew have since been kept in Columbus and Precourt is now the chairman and CEO of Two Oak Ventures, the entity which owns the rights to operate Austin FC and its stadium, while also holding the title of chairman and CEO of Austin FC. Austin FC’s new stadium at McKalla Place (the stadium and the complex around it looks pretty incredible) is privately funded and will hold 20,500 fans when it is completed.

Hiring a former MLS and USMNT star to lead the team makes a lot of sense and Wolff’s name has been mentioned plenty when MLS jobs have become available in recent years. He was on both the 2002 and 2006 USMNT World Cup squads and his experience across MLS and in Europe have given him a unique coaching style.

There is a lot of respect for Wolff among the American soccer community and his playing philosophy is very similar to Berhalter’s. Wolff becoming a head coach is good news for young domestic players.

Berhalter announces staff, includes members of Crew, Union, Germany NT

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USMNT coach Gregg Berhalter’s staff has been announced by U.S. Soccer, including expected assistant coach Josh Wolff.

Former MLS and USMNT striker Wolff, 41, was an assistant to Berhalter in Columbus from 2013-18.

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Joining Wolff on Berhalter’s staff are B.J. Callaghan as strategy analyst and assistant coach, Steve Tashjian as head performance expert and Darcy Norman as movement and conditioning coach. Fellow former Crew assistant Nico Estevez will join as an assistant coach pending a work permit.

“In putting together the staff, we looked for coaches with considerable backgrounds in four different areas: World Cups, Concacaf, MLS and Europe,” Berhalter said in a press release. “This group checks those boxes, and we are confident their wealth of experiences will be beneficial to the players and for the development of our program.”

Callaghan comes from the Philadelphia Union, Tashjian from the Crew, and Norman from the German national team.

Berhalter manages his first match as USMNT boss on Jan. 27 against Panama in Arizona before the Yanks meet Costa Rica on Groundhog Day in San Jose, California.

#Dosacero: The history of United States-Mexico in Columbus (with video)

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COLUMBUS, Ohio – How maddening, how frustrating, how very infuriating it must be for proud Mexican soccer fans to know they have been hashtagged thus:  #Dosacero.

It’s the score (2-0, that is) that keeps recurring in big U.S.-Mexico matches.

Before it was a Twitter hashtag, “Dos a cero” was a rallying cry and a verbal stick in the eyes of Mexican supporters, who ruled the region in soccer until about 12 years ago. That’s when the United States began gaining control of the rivalry, crushing Mexican spirits time and again on U.S. soil and once notoriously in Asia, in a Round-of-16 elimination match at World Cup 2002.

So much of the U.S. dominance on home soil happened in Columbus, site of tonight’s big-stakes World Cup qualifier. Here is the history of “Dos a cero” at Crew Stadium:

2001: The original  “La Guerra Fria”

Cold weather? In Ohio, in February? Who knew?

Clearly, it was a strategic venue selection by U.S. Soccer officials, and how perfectly it all worked out. So many of the U.S. men played in Europe , or had previously. By contrast most from El Tri had always played in Mexico, where temperatures in the 20s are mostly just a scary tale.

So it was bitterly cold as Josh Wolff and Earnie Stewart scored for the United States in the match that started all this. Wolff had his paw prints all over this one, scoring the first goal with a big assist from a Jorge Campos blunder, and then created the insurance strike with some crafty dribbling along the end line. Ironically, Wolff was on the field because Brian McBride had gone off early, injured, unable to see through a badly swollen eye.

That was the important opener in final round qualifying for the 2002 World Cup. There, the United States’ improbable quarterfinal dash helped elevate the game’s domestic standing.

Highlights of that one are here:

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Sept. 3, 2005: The United States qualifies!

Just like tonight, the United States went into the warm September afternoon with opportunity in hand to make it official, to book their spot for Germany 2006. Just like tonight, the opportunity came fortuitously against Mexico.

So the scenes were full of red, white and blue pride and joy at the final whistle. Landon Donovan, having been substituted late that day against Ricardo Lavolpe’s Tri Colors, raced around the field with an American flag draped around his shoulders. Kasey Keller and others joined the celebratory laps, taking it all in along with the boisterous Crew Stadium crowd.

Among those celebrating: U.S. center back Oguchi Onyewu, who had first frustrated Mexican scoring star Jared Borgetti and then stared down the man in a famous picture-book moment. (One that helped to make Onyewu a U.S. fan favorite for years to come.) Also celebrating was Steve Ralston, a fairly unlikely figure to nail the game-winner, the goal that officially sent the United States to Germany.

Oh, the game ended 2-0. Of course it did.

Feb. 11, 2009: “La Guerra Fria Two”  

Torrential rain before kickoff and fierce winds added to the weather-related misery as U.S. fans and players shook off any elements of discomfort, warmed by the knowledge that it all worked to the psychological advantage of Bob Bradley’s team. So chants of “Dos a cero!” rang through the crowd as Tim Howard made huge, early saves. Later, Michael Bradley was Johnny on the Sport to hammer in a rebound off a corner kick.

Bradley supplied the second goal, as well, a big shot from 25 yards.

The match was also memorable for Rafa Marquez’s further vilification among U.S. fans. Marquez was shown a straight red for his ridiculous, studs-up challenge on Howard in the 65th minute.

Highlights of that one:

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The United States defeats Mexico 2-0

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Ah, the good old days. Twelve years ago on this date, the United States beat Mexico in the freezing cold at Columbus Crew Stadium and started a tradition.

“It was one of those games where we finally started to turn things around,” midfielder Earnie Stewart told USSoccer.com. “All of a sudden we went to a new phase. When we played at home against Mexico, we pretty much took over and started winning those games. Columbus was one of those first games where we actually had the attitude that we were playing at home and we could definitely win this game.”

Stewart and Josh Wolff got the goals for the Americans, who would go on to qualify for the 2002 World Cup and reach the quarterfinals after beating — yes — Mexico by a score of — yes — 2-0.

The highlights from 2001:

And if, for some reason, you have the next 90 or so minutes free, here’s the full game:

It’s better than watching the match in Honduras again.