Leagues Cup

Getty Images

Wondolowski on CBA, USMNT, MLS-Liga MX merger and more

Leave a comment

Chris Wondolowski’s league-record 159 goals are telling of his dominance. They’re also telling of the 36-year-old’s longevity in a constantly evolving league.

[ PART 1: Wondo on San Jose, USMNT ]

A professional career that started in 2005, will come to an end in 2020, as “Wondo” signed a final one-year contract with the Black-and-Blue.

Throughout the 14-year spell, the league legend has seen it all: from the league paying rookies $12,500 a year, to signing global superstars to monstrous contracts; from a just-surviving 12-team league, to a 24-team league exploring the possibilities of merging with Liga MX.

[ MORE: All of PST’s MLS coverage ]  

In part two of a two-part Q&A, ProSoccerTalk spoke to Wondo to discuss the how he’s preparing for the upcoming CBA negotiations, what he believes MLS players need in the new deal, a potential MLS-Liga MX merger, and much more.

Editor’s Note: This interview was conducted prior to the San Jose Earthquakes final regular-season game against the Portland Timbers, and was edited for clarity.


ProSoccerTalk: Earlier this season, Luis Robles from New York Red Bulls talked about possibly housing teammates at his house, depending on what happens with the CBA negotiations. How are you preparing, and how are you preparing other teammates to take on this possible period of no work?

Chris Wondolowski: Yeah, I think one just to educate them on all of the details on it, just to make sure that they know what’s going on, but also to plan for it. You always have to be prepared. Whether it’s financially or where you’re going to live or what you’re going to do. You always have to have a plan, so I think that’s the biggest thing. For the last year or two, we’ve been talking to them. You have to save some money – have a little nest egg. So if things don’t go well in the talks, then you’ll still be prepared, still be ready. I’ll definitely do the same as Luis, if the guys need housing or if they need anything, because I’m staying here no matter what. So they’re more than welcome, and I think that’s important for them to understand the whole situation.

Obviously, the situation is worse given the fact that we’re in San Jose, in the Silicon Valley, right? One of the most expensive regions in the world.

Yeah, and that kind of puts some of the guys behind the eight ball. It’s tough especially if you don’t have income coming in. There’s guys who already have 3-4 roommates and, you know, could be sharing rooms just to get by on a normal rent, a normal apartment. So it’s already tough enough as it is and it doesn’t make things easy, but that’s why you have to plan for it and you can’t just react.

From your perspective, what do players need from these CBA negotiations?

I think that the crucial thing is to keep moving the needle so that the players keep progressing and keep taking this league to the next level. And I think what’s important is what play is out there on the field, and so I think that if the player’s rights and the player’s abilities are what’s top priority, then I think that helps the league. I think that these are some of the things that we are really pushing for and that we really want. In years past, it’s been more financial, whether it’s salary cap or minimum coming in or even DP spots. That’s kind of been in the past, whereas this year it’s been more about player’s rights or how things are going in that sense and not necessarily actual numbers this year.

So, how does a player consider it a win? What does a player need exactly? Is it charter flights? Is it eliminating TAM? Maybe it’s not increasing the salary, or maybe it is?

For it to be a win, I don’t think that there’s going to be just one tangible thing where we got this or we didn’t get this so it’s a loss. Again, it’s just moving the needle more for the player and getting more of their rights across the board. It’s many of these things and you mentioned a few of them, whether it is TAM or if it is the salary cap, things of that nature. I think that definitely does help the players, but there are more across the board that the need to progress in.

I mention charter flights because it’s been a topic of conversation all season long. Has there been an instance that you can think back to where you were like, ‘wow this was a logistical nightmare?’

Oh, yeah. We have a few, especially when you’re on the road when we’re going from Salt Lake to New York City, and we’re flying back from the game and we’re in the airport. I remember two years ago we were going to DC, and I think we were at the airport for 8 hours. Flight got delayed and then the flight got cancelled. It was just an absolute logistical nightmare. We were pretty lucky this year with delays and things of that nature. But I know Montreal had a nightmare. I think New England as well, where they’re arriving to the game and it’s tough. 

Do you think that charter flights will patch up – not resolve but patch up – the logistical problems in MLS?

I mean, yes. The travel is a big aspect, especially being a West Coast team travelling to the East Coast. That’s a six hour flight, and you’re losing three hours as well. It’s a whole day that’s gone that could help. Let alone you have to get there two hours before your flight and you have to wait for your bags, and so you’re adding another four hours or so – not including the flight or the time change. That could definitely help. Is it financially feasible? That’s a tough one. That’s a tough battle, so I think that I don’t expect every leg to be chartered, but I do hope that there is more and that the owners have to use them. We could’ve use charter flights this year and we’ve used zero, so that’s also something that’s in need. I know there’s other teams that have used all of their legs and wished they could have used more, so you have to find that balance as well. 

Earlier this season, Wayne Rooney said that the MLS player was underpaid. From your perspective, does that stand true?

Yeah, absolutely. I do. You can just look across the board. Again, I think that we do well for ourselves. I think that it’s amazing how well it’s moved. But I think for this league there’s too much of the haves and have nots. We have 28 guys, and I’d say probably only six of the guys do well. And then there’s 22 other guys who have to get another job. As you mentioned, we live in the Silicon Valley, so they have to do something else to supplement themselves so that they can stay afloat. Starting in this league, it’s moved an amazing amount, but I still think that there’s more to move.

Houston Dynamo (7) Chris Wondolowski scores against FC Dallas goal keeper (1) Shaka Hislop in US Open Lamar Hunt Cup at Robertson Stadium in Houston, Texas on August 23, 2006. Houston won 3 to 0. (Photo by Thomas Shea/MLS)

How did you financially keep yourself afloat when you were playing in Houston and were making less than $20,000 a year?

My rookie year, I was making $12,500. I had 3 roommates. But I coached more and I was spending more time on the field coaching than I was at practice. That’s never good. Every day I was out coaching. I coached five days a week. Again, I think it helped mold me, but at the same time, I don’t wish it upon a professional athlete to do that. 

More and more international players are coming into the league, meaning that the chances of the American player stagnating only increase. There’s fears that the U.S. player might stagnate. Do you agree that for the benefit of MLS players, there should be tougher rules placed on the amount of internationals that can come to this league? On the other hand, some people are talking about blowing up the international rule all together. Do you think that the American player needs to be protected?

Yes, I do. I think that MLS and U.S. Soccer need to coexist and one needs the other one. I think MLS needs U.S. Soccer to do well and to help promote the league, and I think U.S. Soccer needs MLS to do well and to help bring up the next American national team player. I do think it needs to be done. I think that we always want the best product out there. So having foreign players, I’m all for that. But I do think we need to still produce, protect and bring up the next American player. I don’t know what the exact fix is or what the exact number of international players you can [have], but I think that it’s a mistake at times to assume that foreign players are better because they’re from another country. The American player – there’s a great need for them. There’s plenty that can bring a great product out there on the field. So I think we should find that balance. And again, you need both. You can’t just have American players out there. You need the foreign – whatever culture it is – and I think it can help produce that as well. 

There’s been a lot of talk about MLS and Liga MX possibly merging. Tournaments like the Leagues Cup are foreshadowing what it can possibly look like in the future. Do you think this is the right move for MLS, to merge with Liga MX?

I’m not sure if merge is the best, but I do think that some of these tournaments [are beneficial] when they’re done the right way. There was a couple glitches in this year’s tournaments that could be ironed out, but I think that it’s a great thing. When we get to face off against each other, whether it’s Champions League or these special tournaments, I think that it’s a great thing and it helps grow MLS, [especially] if they’re playing Mexican side. I think that it helps them learn the game and see a different side of it, so it’s important.

Yotun leads Cruz Azul to inaugural Leagues Cup in Las Vegas

Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP
Leave a comment

A neutral venue didn’t stop the Leagues Cup Final from rocking on Wednesday evening, as 20,132 fans filed into Sam Boyd Stadium to see Cruz Azul outlast Tigres in the showpiece of the competition.

[ MORE: Martinez scores special solo goal ]

The tournament, staged as a match-up between MLS and Liga MX, saw Mexican entrants as three of its four semifinalists. MLS teams largely chose second choice sides and focused on league play rather than taking a chance to make history.

It was a former MLS player who made the difference in the match. Ex-Orlando City striker Yoshimar Yotun scored a penalty in the 73rd minute before assisting Jonathan Rodriguez with a slick through ball two minutes later.

Next season will see the Leagues Cup move to 16 teams, with the eight MLS entrants the best-finishing teams who fail to qualify for the CONCACAF Champions League.

Petke releases statement after RSL dismissal

Getty Images
2 Comments

Two days after his firing from Real Salt Lake, former head coach Mike Petke has broken his silence with a statement released on social media.

Posted on his official Twitter account, Petke admitted that he lost his temper with referee John Francis Pitti after Real Salt Lake’s 1-0 defeat to Tigres UANL on July 24 and acted poorly in berating the officials. However, he also made clear that he didn’t believe his actions were his true character and he hinted at a potential lawsuit, stating he will “have the chance to discuss the club’s decision in a forum in the future.”

[READ: Premier League Numbers Nerd: Week 1]

Petke also noted that he had signed a contract extension to stay with RSL for the future, only to lose his job days later.

According to reports from the Athletic, Petke allegedly used a Spanish word that is used as a Homophobic slur when speaking to the officials, which reportedly led to his dismissal. Many RSL fans were vocal in their opposition to Petke’s alleged language and there were reports that some of the club’s sponsors expressed issues with Petke’s actions.

The firing on Sunday ended a two-and-a-half year run for Petke in Utah. He was named head coach of RSL’s USL-club, Real Monarchs in late 2016, but just before the start of their season, he was promoted to Real Salt Lake head coach after the dismissal of then-coach Jeff Cassar in similar, expedited fashion.

Petke’s fiery passion and exuberance were on display on the sidelines and in post game press conferences during his time as RSL coach. But in terms of on-the-field success, Petke led RSL to the playoffs last year and had his team in position to make the playoffs this year, if the season ended today.

With Petke gone, assistant coach Freddy Juarez has been elevated to be the new head coach for the rest of the MLS season.

Leagues Cup: Beasley’s beauty not enough v. Club America (video)

Photo by Omar Vega/Getty Images
Leave a comment

DaMarcus Beasley’s rocket goal in the 85th minute forced penalty kicks, but Giovani Dos Santos scored the decisive seventh effort to send Club America past the Houston Dynamo in the Leagues Cup quarterfinals.

Nicolas Benedetti scored for Club America.

[ MORE: Tuesday’s Leagues Cup wrap ]

Agustín Marchesín stopped Romell Quioto’s opening penalty kick, and Club America took the lead when Nicolas Castillo rolled in its first attempt. Houston made its next four shots, but Roger Martinez of the visitors blazed his effort over the bar to force extra kicks.

Sam Junqua was unsuccessful with Houston’s seventh try, and old foe Dos Santos won it for Club America, who will face the winner of Real Salt Lake and UANL Tigres in the semifinal, while LA Galaxy is set to meet Cruz Azul in the other.

The semifinals are Aug. 20 and the final is Sept. 18 in Las Vegas.

Leagues Cup: Lampson leads LA; Fire out

Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
Leave a comment

There’s no shame in Liga MX being a superior league to Major League Soccer, but it would be nice to get more showings of strength from the rapidly improving top flight for Canada and the United States.

The Leagues Cup provided that chance for four teams of MLS, who could make a statement with three quick victories over the next two months. In at least one of Tuesday’s cases, a side’s backups and reserves gave its club the chance to take it more seriously in the semifinals.

[ MORE: Rodgers talks down Maguire sale ]

The Mexican sides, by and large, spend more money deeper into their squad, and most of the clubs were established well before still relatively young MLS.

Throw in both MLS sides clearly ignoring the tournament in favor of weekend league outings, and what could’ve been a really cool tournament could’ve also wasted a lot of peoples’ time on Wednesday despite MLS having the distinct advantage of being hosts for all four quarterfinals.

Godspeed, LA Galaxy.

Chicago Fire 0-2 Cruz Azul

Chicago opted to keep many of its first-choice players on the bench or out of the 18, and it showed in an easy win for away side.

Cruz Azul out-attempted the Fire by a 14-5 margin, and held 69 percent of possession. Fire backstop Richard Sanchez was forced to make six saves, but Roberto Alvarado and Elias Hernandez scored late in each half to plug a couple of away goals onto the board.

Alvarado’s goal was simply magical.

LA Galaxy 2-2 (3-1 pens) Club Tijuana

The resilient hosts took the favored visitors to penalties, where

Servando Carrasco gave LA a lead, and Matt Lampson stopped Erick “Cubo” Torres only to see Efrain Alvarez clanked the next effort off the post. Ariel Nahuelpán then leveled the score before Gibran Lajud made a save for Tijuana

But Lampson answered the bell, and it was 1-1 after three rounds each. He made another save on Angel Sepulveda’s poor penalty, and Giancarlo Gonzalez sent the Galaxy into the semifinals.

Tijuana had most of the ball, nearly doubled LA’s passes, and out-attempted the Galaxy 20-7.

Emmanuel Boateng turned a Kai Koreniuk shot past Gibran Lajud for a 27th minute lead, but TJ tied the score within six minutes and took the lead just before halftime.

Dave Romney had an answer after halftime with a thundering header off an Efrain Alvarez corner kick, and LA was back in business with 37 minutes to play.

Tijuana’s Miller Bolanos hit the post in the 70th, but the danger was largely non-existent the rest of the way aside from wasted free kicks.

LA’s Julian Araujo was sent off in stoppage time for a second yellow card.