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Morocco vows ‘clean’ World Cup bid that won’t exploit Trump

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Instead of trying to exploit Donald Trump’s unpopularity around the world, Morocco is working to distance itself from allegations of corruption as the African country goes head-to-head with North America to host the 2026 World Cup.

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Any attempt to drag American presidential politics into the soccer campaign could be dangerous territory for the north African bidders. Morocco is saddled by its own baggage: bribery accusations against past World Cup bids that were leveled by U.S. prosecutors in the sprawling investigation into soccer corruption.

Those accused implicated in the alleged Moroccan vote-buying plot are yet to stand trial, and the 2026 bid team does not want to be held responsible for any unproven misdeeds in the past.

“We do not have anything to do with the past as Morocco,” 2026 bid chief executive Hicham El Amrani said in an interview with The Associated Press.

“Do not make me comment on past bids for which we were not part of. Our bid is clean and will be compliant and this is what counts.”

Morocco has only just launched its campaign, blocking the unimpeded path to victory envisaged by the joint bid from the United States, Canada and Mexico for the first World Cup that jumps from 32 to 48 teams.

The U.S., which is the dominant partner with 60 of 80 games, has acknowledged the bid could be weighed down by negative global perceptions about the country. During his first year in the White House, Trump has faced international criticism for disparaging countries, including denigrating the African continent in a recent private outburst.

While Trump won’t be in office in 2026, the vote is in June. And for the first time, a winning World Cup bid requires the backing of the majority of the world. Rather than a select group of around 20 FIFA executives voting, all 211 soccer nations cast a ballot.

“I will leave up to voters to decide what they think – our focus is on our bid,” El Amrani said when asked about Trump. “I won’t make comments about the leadership here and there.

“We don’t want to win the right to host because of someone else, but because of our clear advantages … we will stay away (from Trump) because it’s not proper to (comment).”

Instead, Morocco believes it has a positive case to pitch to voters to counter North America’s assertion that it is the “risk averse” option that can replenish the shortfalls in the FIFA finances after sponsors fled during corruption scandals.

“Contrary to what we can hear about potential revenue,” El Amrani said, “Morocco has a fantastic offer from that perspective …. and financial certainty.”

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A proposition that is attractive to television viewers as well as fans and players on the ground, according to El Amrani, who was previously general secretary at the Confederation of African Football.

“We have a unique selling proposition as a very compact country,” El Amrani said.

While the North American bid covers a trio of time zones and nations, no multi-hour flights would be required between venues in Morocco.

“It allows better comfort and less traveling time,” El Amrani said. “That will allow for better quality of play.”

FIFA will earn $300 million more from the North American broadcasters if the 2026 World Cup is played in the region under the terms of contracts negotiated to stave off legal action for shifting the dates of the 2022 tournament in Qatar.

Morocco is predicting any shortfall could be filled because of a time zone that makes games more accessible for global television viewers, particularly in lucrative European market.

“Morocco represents a sweet spot in terms of time zones,” El Amrani said. “Morocco will be a profitable destination for FIFA.”

Morocco will propose 14 potential venues when the bid book is delivered in March, expanding some stadiums with modular designs that can be downsized. El Amrani declined at this stage to forecast the cost of stadium construction, preparing training grounds and securing the nation for the biggest event in its history.

“There are still gaps we need to fulfil to what is required 2026,” We are convinced we will reach it.”

Morocco lost out to the U.S. for the right to host the 1994 World Cup and last bid when South Africa landed the 2010 tournament for the continent for the first time.

Rob Harris is at http://www.twitter.com/RobHarris and http://www.facebook.com/RobHarrisReports

More AP coverage of FIFA: http://www.apnews.com/tag/FIFA

The merits of a 48-team World Cup (and sample draw)

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There are fans in certain confederations disappointed at the expansion of the World Cup to 48 teams in 2026.

A vocal group of Europeans already think it should essentially be a Europe-heavy tournament, and expect the expansion will lead to many blowouts.

Some American and CONCACAF fans worry it will dilute World Cup qualifying, snaring drama from so many fun nights across North and Central America.

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There’s something in those arguments, but the gains will outweigh the losses across the world. In other words, we have to be careful that we aren’t living in an echo chamber that the political world would even find a bit goofy.

Consider New Zealand, by far the strongest team in its region, has not be assured a spot in the tournament unless it can win a playoff tie. Or great stories like Bob Bradley‘s Egypt, who was at the mercy of a home-and-home battle for a World Cup group despite going 6-0 in group play.

Look it’s easy to be selfish in these instances, but we are not likely to be dealing with the oft-cited “Tahiti in the 2013 Confederations Cup” scenario.

In fact, let’s consider how it would look. Let’s assume that the 16 groups of three teams still feature one seeded team and confederations remain separated.

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UEFA will get 16 teams, and have one team per group. CONMEBOL goes up to six teams, with CONCACAF going to 6.5. Africa goes up to nine, while Asia moves to 8.5. Oceania gets one, presumably, with the hosts snaring an extra.


Using ELOratings.net and the FIFA ratings, here is who would be headed for the World Cup:

Seeded: Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Chile, Belgium, Colombia, France, Portugal, Uruguay, Spain, Switzerland, Wales, England, Croatia, Poland, HOSTS.

Remaining UEFA (5): Italy, Netherlands, Republic of Ireland, Turkey, Ukraine.

Brazil Soccer WCup Colombia Ivory CoastRemaining CONMEBOL (1): Ecuador.

CAF (9): Ivory Coast, Senegal, Egypt, Nigeria, Algeria, Cameroon, South Africa, Tunisia, Ghana.

Asia (9): South Korea, Iran, Japan, Australia, Uzbekistan, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Qatar, Syria.

CONCACAF (7): Mexico, Costa Rica, USA, Panama, Honduras, Canada, Jamaica.

Oceania (1): New Zealand

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Now a sample draw, where two teams would advance from each group.

GROUP A:
Argentina
Italy
Senegal

GROUP B:
Brazil
Netherlands
Egypt

GROUP C:
Germany
Ivory Coast
Mexico

GROUP D:
Chile
Republic of Ireland
Nigeria

GROUP E:
Belgium
Syria
Algeria

GROUP F:
Colombia
Turkey
Cameroon

GROUP G:
France
Qatar
South Africa

GROUP H:
Portugal
UAE
Tunisia

GROUP I:
Uruguay
Ukraine
Ghana

GROUP J:
Spain
Saudi Arabia
Costa Rica

GROUP K:
Switzerland
Uzbekistan
United States

GROUP L:
Wales
Australia
Panama

GROUP M:
England
Japan
New Zealand

GROUP N:
Croatia
Iran
Honduras

GROUP O:
Poland
Ecuador
Canada

GROUP P:
HOSTS (Let’s cater to UEFA and say, uh, Greece)
South Korea
Jamaica

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RECIFE, BRAZIL - JUNE 29: Giorgos Samaras of Greece controls the ball against Oscar Duarte of Costa Rica during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Round of 16 match between Costa Rica and Greece at Arena Pernambuco on June 29, 2014 in Recife, Brazil. (Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images)
RECIFE, BRAZIL – JUNE 29: Giorgos Samaras of Greece and Oscar Duarte of Costa Rica  (Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images)

So, you’re getting more games and more meaningful games, each in their own individual television window. Even groups that seem clean cut — like Spain, Saudi Arabia, and Costa Rica — could be flipped on their ear by the end of the first match.

For what it’s worth, I would not end every match with penalty kicks and keep draws. I’d rather see extra time than an impetus for Greece to pack it inside its own 18 for 90 minutes.

But I believe we’d see something better from a 48-team tournament, and it would mostly end the days of, “Man I wish this list of stars was at the World Cup” (or at least make the list much smaller).

As for the “dud teams” involved, those countries get one less guaranteed game by the move to 3-team groups. And while in some ways qualifying would certainly suffer, consider the following scenarios. With CONMEBOL having 1.5 more spots, you’d see teams 9 and 10 alive longer in qualifying. That’s why it’s arguably an improvement for South America, who should’ve gone to a Hex-style format long ago.

What do you think? Are you bummed about the 48-team World Cup? Or is a lot of the furor rooted in a preference to dislike FIFA moves from the hop?

Follow @NicholasMendola