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U.S. Open Cup wrap: “Cupsets” dot second round slate

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There were “Cupsets” in several locations during the early matches of the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup’s second round on Wednesday.

[ MORE: Atleti wins Europa League ]

Two PDL teams, an NPSL side, and a league qualifier picked up wins over USL competition, with FC Wichita, Mississippi Brilla, Ocean City Nor’easters, and NTX Rayados recording wins.

Tulsa Roughnecks 3-4 FC Wichita

The USL hosts led 1-0 and 2-1 through Jhon Pirez and Riggs Lennon, but the pesky NPSL visitors refused to go away. Franck Yayou scored two goals and outscored its pro opponents 2-1 down the stretch in one of the night’s “Cupsets.”

FC Cincinnati 4-1 (aet) Detroit City FC

There was controversy before the game when FCC decided to play in a much smaller venue and limit away tickets to a few dozen, and Detroit used it as a rallying cry to the tune of an early lead through a counterattack befitting almost any league on Earth. Cincy answered big time, but needed extra time to put away the NPSL side.

FC Motown 1-3 Penn FC

Another scare from an NPSL side saw well-traveled MLS man Dilly Duka put the hosts ahead in the 53rd minute, but the visitors scored thrice in the final 11 minutes to move onto the third round.

Jacksonville Armada 1-0 Tampa Bay Rowdies

An old NASL rivalry saw Jimmy Banks’ 58th minute goal carry the Armada into the third round.

Elsewhere
North Carolina FC 3-0 Lansdowne Bhoys FC
Charlotte Independence 1-3 Ocean City Nor’easters
Erie Commodores 1-2 Pittsburgh Riverhounds
Reading United 1-1 (3-4, pks) Richmond Kickers
Seacoast United Phantoms 0-2 Elm City Express
Charleston Battery 1-0 South Georgia Tormenta FC
Louisville City FC 5-0 Long Island Rough Riders
Miami FC2 1-3 Miami United 
Mississippi Brilla 1-0 Indy Eleven
Midland-Odessa Sockers 0-4 San Antonio FC
Nashville SC
2-0 Inter Nashville FC
Colorado Springs Switchbacks
3-2 FC Denver
NTX Rayados 5-2 (aet) Oklahoma City Energy
Duluth FC – Saint Louis FC
Sporting Arizona – Phoenix Rising
Fresno FC – Orange County FC
Las Vegas Lights – FC Tucson
Reno 1868 – Portland Timbers U23
Sacramento Republic – San Francisco City FC

PST survey results: Lower leagues, and that darned pyramid

Photo credit: Detroit City FC / Twitter: @DetroitCityFC
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The results of PST’s Big American Soccer Survey are in, and our staff will be walking through the results of thousands of votes in a series of posts this week.

We didn’t realize you could acronymize it to BASS, or else we would’ve done it sooner. Today’s BASS questions deal with lower leagues and pro/rel.

[ MORE: All Big American Soccer Survey posts ]

Before we get to the results of three intriguing questions regarding domestic soccer, let’s talk a bit about the mercurial nature of our blossoming-if-haphazard soccer country.

Do you want a team, or do you want a culture?

Those ideas aren’t mutually exclusive, but too often the expectation that starting one will ignite another turns out to be foolhardy.

We’re in the Wild West of American soccer right now, make no mistake about it, and the frontier is far from settled.

That’s unavoidable in a country so big, with travel costs so high, where the most established league is a whopping two decades old and support is far from traditional.

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American soccer tends to lean on its success stories, and understandably so. Portland, Seattle, and Kansas City are among myriad wonderful tales for a nascent culture.

But support is so much more than one set of fans, or players, or an owner. Look no further than Rochester, where an annual playoff team in a soccer specific stadium has suffered under the weight of unsatisfied MLS expectations.

Or San Francisco, a one-and-done champion of the NASL.

Or Austin, which failed to support a USL team but is emboldened at the idea of getting another city’s MLS team.

Or Dayton. Or Wilmington. San Antonio Scorpions. Atlanta Silverbacks.

(We’re going to conveniently leave out the teams dropped into a city by a league in order to battle for a market because this is America and we just need Borussia Butte competing for market share with Montana Monterrey United).

Each of these “failures” has a story, and we’re not naive enough to pretend each falls on one reason. Some American cities, accustomed to having the best example of any particular spot in their region via the NBA, NFL, MLB, or NHL, simply won’t support a league which wouldn’t rate in the Top 20 — or way worse — on a global scale.

We like to blame leagues more than anyone which is insanely easy given the closed structure of every league and the highly-magnified nature of Major League Soccer as a torch holder. Sometimes it’s deserved (the handling of Columbus, the handling of Columbus, as well as the handling of Columbus). Other times, probably not.

[ MORE: All #SaveTheCrew news ]

It would take a much longer post than this to figure it all out, and much brighter minds than mine. In fact, one of our biggest flaws as a soccer community is pretending to unveil a universal fix inside of one big lightbulb.

If we had to proffer some easy fixes, they would be this

chattanoogafc.com

— Support your local club. I don’t simply mean by buying tickets, though that certainly helps, but by allying with the cause of improving support in your area. It might seem odd to be a group of four friends starting a supporters’ group for your third- or fourth-tier club, but the team will love it and your enthusiasm just might make someone else come back for seconds. Believe us, we’ve heard the arguments about quality of play, etc., but at some point desire for the development of our culture starts at home. Look at Chattanooga (right), Detroit City (at top), and even Sacramento for this. Look at Columbus while it’s being tortured, too, and look it in the eye. Maybe MLS wouldn’t have given Columbus a market had the league started up today, but it did 20 years ago and we’re fairly sure the business isn’t hemorrhaging money and the fans haven’t quit on the idea of the Crew.

Detroit is really an incredible example, and it’s pertinent as MLS entertains expanding to the city with an organization which isn’t Detroit City FC. Full disclosure: I’ve run a club which has staged a derby with DCFC, and I’ve watched the Motor City outfit go from “Detroit should have a soccer team” to “I bet we could fund restoring a neighborhood stadium and sell it out” to defying critics about what’s possible for a fourth-tier (for now) club. And without as much first hand knowledge from this writer, Chattanooga’s growth predates DCFC’s story with some striking similarities. If either club’s ownership was unable to move forward, I have no doubt their fan bases would rally to keep the clubs alive.

— Support your local soccer-first organization, too. If there’s a group running a program in low-income areas or aiming to elevate the quality of youth soccer without demanding $4000 per player and the pipe dream of maybe being seen by FC Porto’s North American marketing director (then maybe look into whether they do good work with donations, or if the donations make sure the “technical director” has a nicer house).

So to the questions, which show an appetite for the game at all levels and a desire to move toward an open model. And again, this demands you support your local club, because the idea that Major League Soccer is going to ask its owners to risk their investment dipping into a lower tier is improbable. We’re not saying we wouldn’t love it. And we’re not saying we won’t keep asking for it. But change in American hierarchy, especially when it comes to big money, takes a lot of work and lobbying.

Yes, I realize I’ve glossed over the pro/rel part in one paragraph, but let’s be very, very real here: You entered this discussion with a very pointed opinion on promotion and relegation in America. The results of the survey say most of us want to see it, but I couldn’t convince supporters it’s a bad idea or detractors that it’s necessary. I will say this: It’d be great if leagues found a way to make it work despite the massive travel costs that would multiply a successful team’s path upward. With loads of respect for the idea and how successful the open pyramid is in other countries, few if any have to deal with the gigantic landscape of the US of A (let alone several Canadian teams as well).

According to our voters:

WATCH: Michigan striker fires acrobatic volley in U.S. Open Cup

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There’s a lone third round game on the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup docket on Tuesday, but it’s provided a peach of a goal.

Michigan Bucks of the fourth-tier PDL and Saint Louis FC of the second-tier USL are jostling for the right to face Chicago Fire in the fourth round, and the first half featured a trio of goals.

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With the pros leading 2-0, Bucks winger Francis Atuahene belted a high volley over the backs and into the goal to give Michigan hope at the break.

Atuahene has 18 goals and seven assists in two years at the University of Michigan, but his production has been overshadowed by the Wolverines’ relative struggles. Still, the Ghana-born rising junior should have another fantastic year at Ann Arbor.

Upsets abound in U.S. Open Cup second round

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The second round of the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup didn’t need more than a quarter of its slate to provide genuine upsets.

Or, as they #USOC crowd likes to call them, Cupsets.

[ MORE: Huddersfield Town to Wembley ]

USL side Richmond Kickers and NASL clubs Indy Eleven and New York Cosmos were knocked out of the Open Cup by lower tier sides on Wednesday, with the Kickers bowing out at the hands (and feet) of fifth-tier Christos FC.

Richmond Kickers 0-1 Christos FC

Not that Christos are pushovers, but overseas they’d be called a Sunday League side. Champions of the Amateur Open Cup and the National Cup, Christos FC got a goal from one of its many UMBC grads, Geaton Caltabiano, to knock out Richmond.

Consider that Christos traveled to Western New York last week for a Werner Fricker Cup quarterfinal and won 1-0 with nine men, and it’s somewhat less surprising. But this is a major moment for both the Sunday Leaguers and this year’s tournament.

Reading United 3-2 New York Cosmos

This one’s nearly as surprising, considering the Cosmos have been the darlings of this tournament in years past. The NASL side has handled its business against several MLS sides, but ran into a problem with Reading United (one of the better programs in the fourth-tier PDL and an affiliate of the Philadelphia Union).

Paul Marie, Marco Micaletto, and Frantzdy Pierrot scored for Reading, while Kalif Alhassan and ex-USMNT midfielder Danny Szetela scored for the Cosmos.

Michigan Bucks 1-0 Indy Eleven

University of Michigan star Francis Atuahene scored the lone goal, assisted by Jordan Snell, as the PDL champs knocked the NASL visitors out of the tournament.

FC Cincinnati 0-0 AFC Cleveland

It took extra time to separate the USL hosts and the visiting champions of the fourth-tier NPSL, thanks mainly to AFCC keeper Alex Ivanov, but former Randers and Molde striker Baye Djiby Fall scored in the 115th minute to save Cincy blushes.

Elsewhere
Rochester Rhinos
3-0 Motown FC
Tartan Devils 0-9 Louisville City
Boston City 1-2 GPS Omens
Carolina Dynamo 1-6 North Carolina FC
Miami United 1-2 Jacksonville Armada
Atlanta Silverbacks 1-2 Charleston Battery
Miami FC 3-2 South Florida Surf
Ocean City 0-1 Harrisburg City Islanders
Chicago United 3-1 Pittsburgh Riverhounds
Houston Dutch Lions 1-2 San Antonio
Oklahoma City Energy 5-1 Moreno Valley
Tulsa Roughnecks 5-3 Oklahoma City Energy U23
Wichita 3-4 Saint Louis FC
Colorado Springs 2-0 FC Tucson

Later
Fuego – Phoenix Rising
San Francisco Deltas  – Burlingame
Golden State Force – Orange County SC
LA Wolves – Chula Vista
OSA FC – Reno
Sacramento Republic – Anahuac

U.S. Open Cup moves forward as MLS teams enter the fray this week

Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images
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Any minnows remaining find themselves in the ocean as the 2016 Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup takes its fourth round bow on Tuesday night.

Will we see any Cupsets this week? Hard to say. MLS teams haven’t played a league game in over a week heading into the fourth round, while the NASL and USL are coming off weekend matches.

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Then, there’s PDL professional side Kitsap Pumas and USASA entry La Maquina FC, who would have to knock off Seattle Sounders and L.A. Galaxy to move forward. Either of those would be absolutely shocking wins.

One of those will be contested tonight, with the Galaxy hosting La Maquina.

Fourth round matches

Tuesday
Colorado Rapids (MLS) vs. Colorado Springs Switchbacks (USL)
Real Salt Lake (MLS) vs. Wilmington Hammerheads (USL)
L.A. Galaxy (MLS) vs. La Maquina FC (USASA)
Portland Timbers (MLS) vs. San Jose Earthquakes (MLS)

Wednesday
Rochester Rhinos (USL) vs. New York Red Bulls (MLS)
Jacksonville Armada (NASL) vs. Orlando City (MLS)
Chicago Fire (MLS) vs. Indy Eleven (NASL)
New York City FC (MLS) vs. New York Cosmos (NASL)
Philadelphia Union (MLS) vs. Harrisburg City Islanders (USL)
Carolina RailHawks (NASL) vs. New England Revolution (MLS)
Columbus Crew SC (MLS) vs. Tampa Bay Rowdies (NASL)
DC United (MLS) vs. Fort Lauderdale Strikers (NASL)
Minnesota United (NASL) vs. Sporting KC (MLS)
FC Dallas (MLS) vs. Oklahoma City Energy (USL)
Houston Dynamo (MLS) vs. San Antonio FC (USL)
Seattle Sounders (MLS) vs. Kitsap Pumas (PDL)