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USL begins 10th season with eye on future

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The United Soccer League begins its 10th season on Friday with a pair of matches in the Championship; Seattle Sounders 2 will host Reno 1868 and Orange County plays host to El Paso Locomotive.

A lot has changed in under a decade. The Championship division now has 35 teams, while the third-tier League One has another dozen (with 30 more lobbying to get into it the thing).

We caught up with some USL mainstays at all levels to talk about the progress, from league president Jake Edwards to San Diego Loyal co-founder Warren Smith and Pittsburgh Riverhounds coach and serial hardware winner Bob Lilley.

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The coach is a good place to start. Lilley has won titles in the A-League with the Montreal Impact, the USL First Division with Vancouver Whitecaps, and the USL with the Rochester Rhinos in 2015. Now he’s turned around the Pittsburgh Riverhounds ahead of the 2020 season.

He sees the USL’s growth as pay-off for a generation of players, coaches, and owners who were willing to put in the time for the good of the sport, looking back fondly on the role he played in helping ambitious clubs Montreal and Vancouver win on their way to MLS.

“It’s an investment that starts out where you’re just putting pennies in a piggy bank and at some point it grows big enough that it takes on a life of its own,” Lilley said of the USL’s progress. “The increases keep getting bigger, and the last 3-5 years we’ve been really driving forward. We need to find new ways to be meaningful to our market. We need to stay aggressive, trying to keep pushing this thing forward.”

Like Lilley, Smith has done this dance and done it well in a lot of different places. Now the president of first-year side San Diego, he’s overseen the resurgence of the Portland Timbers and the growth of Sacramento Republic.

Smith makes a remarkable claim about what a USL club can mean to a market.

“The difference between us and MLS, just because of where they are choosing to have to put their teams, I think New Mexico United means more to the whole state of New Mexico than most MLS teams mean to their particular cities. We’re able to electrify communities and bring people together, uniting and celebrating the people of the region.”

To Smith and Edwards, it comes down to the variety of top minds running clubs.

Smith says that less than a decade ago, the investors in the room were coming from soccer backgrounds. Now, it’s others who see the investment as sound.

“In 2012 at the annual meetings, the room was full of soccer fans, soccer people, more soccer people than business people,” Smith said. “Since then with the success of Orlando and Sacramento, we’ve seen an influx of more experience and different sports experience. There’s a lot more sophistication, and the league has chosen a good group owners who want to grow the brand. The USL was good football then, but it’s even better now.”

Edwards said the league likes “to hang its hats” on its ownership groups, who in turn have had to learn from the successes and mistakes of their forebearers while also recognizing that this giant country has a plethora of soccer cultures.

“You’ve got to listen first and foremost,” Edwards said. “You’ve got to spend the time in the community and learn it before you launch to learn what it is they want out of a football club. You have someone who owns the team but really they own the team.

“Ultimately they’ve got to listen and be amongst the community and let the fan base have a voice. Our clubs can be such a great representation of their communities. There’s a real sense of pride people have in their communities that they might not have an outlet for, and the football club gives them that outlet. Go down and be with six or seven thousand people, and wear your colors and show your passion to be from Louisville, Albuquerque, Austin, or Oklahoma City.”

What Edwards stresses is doing expansion “the right way” over the long-term, angling to grow and grow to make a massive impression when all eyes are trained on the United States for the 2026 World Cup in North America.

“What do we want to look like when it arrives?” he asks. “We will see between now and the World Cup, a few more expansion markets like Providence, Buffalo, Des Moines, and some of you haven’t heard of yet. League One is a huge focus for us. We’ve gone from 10 to 12 teams, and now we have 30 markets that are actively lobbying to bring League One to their communities.”

Lilley says it helps that the soccer has improved tremendously since he was a player in the early 90s, pre-MLS.

“It’s just a whole different landscape now,” Lilley said. “You know the movie ‘Slapshot?’ Some of the start of me coming into the pro soccer environment — NASL was done. MISL was just shutting done — in the late 80s, some of the fights and some of the stuff going down on the field was comparable.”

The players are better, and the coaches, too. Three of his former players, in fact, have gone on to coach in MLS (Mauro Biello, Mark Watson, Nick Dasovic).

Lilley has seen the tactics grow from when he instituted a flat back four in the late 1990s after seeing it become all the rage in Europe. He’s worked past three at the back, five at the back, you name it, but it’s only in this last stage of the USL that he’s seen big changes in coaching (so credit to whom for still winning).

“From 1997 to 2010, whatever I saw from a team early in the season a lot of times it would be the same thing later in the season,” he said. “That’s not the case. I think it makes everyone better when new ideas… everyone’s trying to win and that’s the expectation of owners. It’s not okay just to make up the numbers.”

Bob Lilley
Lilley coaches Pittsburgh in the U.S. Open Cup (Photo by Jason Mowry/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Lilley says that’s why he’s sure to instruct his players on being functional outside of a base system. He switches it up on them.

What drives him?

“Trying to survive,” Lilley said. “Trying to win so I can stay in it. I try to build flexibility in my team. I think part of growth is not just giving guys game but trying to give them information tactically. There’s so much tape out there, we’re always looking for an edge. Sometimes with the team, if you play the same way all the time and it’s not quite working, and then you change, you can send them in a tailspin, ‘Well what’s wrong? What did we do?’ but if you tell them you’re preparing them and looking for an edge, well, good players adapt to the environment, to the coaches, to the system, to the weather, to the referees, to the opponent. It’s hard to prepare for us because we do a lot of things well.”

So as the league drives forward into Year No. 10, there is a collection of executives, staff, and coaches who’ve been through the proverbial war and are smarter for it. There’s been attrition, of course, but now there’s stability.

And it’s Edwards’ job to remember where they’ve been as much as where they are going.

“When I think back to the wild west days, the boom or bust days, it was a core mission to get away from that,” he said. “We’ve done that, but we’re still in growth mode.”

Nashville SC moves home opener to 69k seat Nissan Stadium

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Nashville SC is going to have essentially two home openers.

Demand is so high for the USL club’s home debut that it has announced a move to Nissan Stadium for the March 24 opener against the Pittsburgh Riverhounds.

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The club, which will play the remainder of its matches at First Tennessee Park, will join Major League Soccer in 2019 or 2020.

Nissan Stadium seats 69,143, and is the home of the NFL’s Tennessee Titans. It’s been the host venue for several International Champions Cup and U.S. Soccer matches.

From NashvilleSC.com:

“We saw the incredible passion and support of our fans in our preseason exhibition last Saturday,” said Nashville SC CEO Court Jeske. “On Saturday, March 24, we have our first opportunity to play a regular season match in front of those fans. By moving this event to Nissan Stadium, Nashville Soccer Club wanted to ensure that every fan that wants to take in history will have the opportunity to do so.”

Gonna be a party.

Wild! Coach loses USL job to D-2 requirements

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Coaching changes happen all the time, but this is one you don’t see every day.

The USL’s Pittsburgh Riverhounds have hired one of the best coaches in league history away from rival Rochester Rhinos, but that’s not the rub of the story here

That Bob Lilley would be wanted by any number of teams is no surprise, but that he’s filling a vacancy caused by United States Soccer Federation’s requirement for Division II teams feels insane.

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USSF requirements demand that a coach should hold its A License. Dave Brandt doesn’t have one despite terrific tenures with NCAA Division III college power Messiah and the D-1 program at the Naval Academy.

Pittsburgh missed the playoffs this year while Lilley again led a the low-budget Rhinos to the playoffs with assistants Mark Pulisic (Yes, that’s Christian’s dad) and Brendan Murphy, so this is a terrific pickup for Rochester.

But Brandt left a decent gig at Navy for this spot. Was there no solution for US Soccer?

“We are highly disappointed with this news, but understand the necessity to comply with the league’s decision,” Riverhounds owner Tuffy Shallenberger said. “Dave has been nothing shy of first class since joining the organization. We are incredibly grateful for his contributions to the Riverhounds and he has left the team in a significantly better position than when he arrived.”

Heck of a name on that owner, to be sure!

On the surface, this isn’t the fault of the USL or the Riverhounds, rather the requirements of D-II sanctioning. And we’re sure that Brandt was given some sort of notice to sort it out.

Those have probably been under a microscope after the NASL sued the USSF, but at some point it’s ridiculous to punish a good coach that Pittsburgh wished to employ because he hasn’t gone to your classes.

USL player who launched brutal attack has contract terminated

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The Pittsburgh Riverhounds have terminated the contract of Romeo Parkes following his shocking on-field attack last weekend.

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On Saturday Jamaican international Parkes, 25, sent a flying kick into the back of New York Red Bulls defender Karl Ouimette after both players had been sent off.

Parkes has since apologized but that hasn’t saved him his job.

In a statement released by the Riverhounds, team owner Tuffy Shallenberger apologized and revealed they had terminated Parks’ contract with immediate effect.

“I want to apologize to the fans and the Red Bulls II organization, as well as Karl Ouimette, for what transpired at the game last night,” Shallenberger stated. “Romeo’s actions are not representative of what our organization and its Academy stands for in regards to helping promote and grow this sport in not only the Greater Allegheny area, but also nationwide.

“We understand the severity of this situation and made it a point to respond as quickly as possible within our power.”

Head coach Mark Steffens reflected Shallenberger’s sentiments.

“As I stated last night, this is an unfortunate situation and one that was embarrassing for not only myself, but also the staff and the organization.” Steffens said. “The discipline being handed out is one that we, as a staff, consider to be fair and completely justified. The actions were not representative of what this team stands for as a whole.”

You can watch Parkes’ actions in the video above.

He only signed for the Riverhounds this February and has scored five goals in his first six games for the third-tier outfit.

After being called up to Jamaica’s preliminary 40-man Copa America Centenario roster for the tournament this summer, it seems highly unlikely Parkes will be able to find another team in the U.S. in the foreseeable future.

WATCH: Vile attack in USL match should lead to massive suspension

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People make mistakes, but this one is close to unforgivable and perhaps should see a USL player in an American police station.

Pittsburgh Riverhounds forward Romeo Parkes turned into a very different sort of attacker during an incident with New York Red Bulls II defender Karl Ouimette.

A Canadian national teamer, Ouimette had been shown red and continued to chatter with Parkes as he walked off the field. Parkes responds by kicking Ouimette in the back as the defender walked away.

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Ouimette needed to make taken off the field by stretcher, but later did board the team bus. The USL moved quickly to suspend Parkes. The league says it will begin a “full investigation” of the incident.

Regardless of injury, Parkes shouldn’t play again this year. Want to send a message? That’s how you do it. The USL should say, “This doesn’t stand in our league.” Even if it emerged that Ouimette said or did something incredibly heinous, does that change the fact that Parkes kicked a guy in or near the spine?

Parkes has apologized to everyone, including the city of Pittsburgh because, well, he better.

Even tennis legend Martina Navratilova was moved by the incident: