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Spurs outlast Man City in chaotic UCL 2nd leg

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  • Four goals in first 11 minutes
  • Sterling, Son score two each
  • Aguero gives City first lead of tie in 59th
  • Llorente puts Spurs back in front

Fernando Llorente’s 73rd minute goal withstood the review of VAR and Raheem Sterling‘s stoppage time finish did not, as Tottenham Hotspur advanced past Manchester City in an all-timer of a UEFA Champions League semifinal second leg.

It finished 4-3 to City on the day and 4-4 on aggregate, with Spurs scoring the only away goals. Tottenham will meet Ajax in the semifinal.

Heung-Min Son scored twice for Spurs, with Llorente’s winner overcoming a glance off his arm.

Sterling scored twice for City, who also got goals from Bernardo Silva and Sergio Aguero. The quadruple hunt is dead.

[ MORE: Full lineups, stats, box score ]

It didn’t take long for City to level the tie, a third minute pass from Kevin De Bruyne finding Sterling. The English winger cut inside as Kieran Trippier gave him room to fire a shot just inside the far post and into the side netting.

Son then demanded City score at least twice with an eighth minute marker to make it 2-1 on aggregate when Aymeric Laporte‘s poor intervention fell to the South Korean. Ederson got the a piece of it, but not enough to stop the ball from heading into the goal.

Then, again! Lucas Moura played Son into the left of the box, and Son curled one side netting to put City in an awful place after less than 10 minutes.

City was unbowed, a long pass finding Bernardo Silva in line for an 11th minute goal to make it 2-2 on the day and 3-2 to Spurs over two legs.

But wait, there’s more.

Sterling finished from an acute angle — really, though, it was a tougher task than we’ve made it sound — after De Bruyne swung a delightful cross over the fray.

The match made it an absurd (not really) 25 minutes without a goal, making it to halftime with the most notable occurrence being Moussa Sissoko‘s injury.

Son gave away a free kick to De Bruyne outside the 18, and Spurs faced a nervy moment in the 48th minute. But the Belgian sent an arrow just over the goal and it remained 3-3 on aggregate.

Sterling then forced a great save out of Lloris, with Danny Rose getting away with a tug on Bernardo as the pair went for the rebound.

Lloris then made a tremendous parry with his left arm to deny De Bruyne, and Ilkay Gundogan‘s corner led to more City possession but no immediate threat.

Spurs countered with great danger in the 58th, Ederson stymying a half-strength header from Fernando Llorente and then collecting a Christian Eriksen shot.

That’s when Aguero struck to take their first lead of the tie, taking a lay-off from De Bruyne and blasting inside the near post. 4-2, 4-3.

Son’s run tested Ederson in-tight to give Spurs a 72nd minute corner, which led to a goal.

Llorente put Spurs back in front on the day to bring the tie to 4-4 with Spurs claiming the only away goals, the goal defying a slight touch of the Spaniard’s elbow upon VAR review.

Bernardo then won City a corner as the match entered its final dozen minutes plus stoppage. Gundogan blazed over goal, and an Aguero header was soon claimed by Lloris.

Sterling then struck in the third minute of stoppage time, but the goal was taken off the board for offside by VAR!

Man City, Spurs combine for 5 goals in first 21 minutes (video)

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Manchester City and Tottenham Hotspur quintupled the goal output from the first leg of their UEFA Champions League quarterfinal.

That in itself was the sign of a good match, but the fact that the first four goals occurred within 11 minutes of kickoff made for pure insanity before the match was one-quarter of the way to its conclusion.

[ MORE: Full lineups, stats, box score ]

It didn’t take long for City to level the tie, a third minute pass from Kevin De Bruyne finding Sterling. The English winger cut inside as Kieran Trippier gave him room to fire a shot just inside the far post and into the side netting.

Son then demanded City score at least twice with an eighth minute marker to make it 2-1 on aggregate when Aymeric Laporte‘s poor intervention fell to the South Korean. Ederson got the a piece of it, but not enough to stop the ball from heading into the goal.

Then, again! Lucas Moura played Son into the left of the box, and Son curled one side netting to put City in an awful place after less than 10 minutes.

City was unbowed, a long pass finding Bernardo Silva in line for an 11th minute goal to make it 2-2 on the day and 3-2 to Spurs over two legs.

But wait, there’s more: Sterling finished from an acute angle — really, though, it was a tougher task than we’ve made it sound — after De Bruyne swung a delightful cross over the fray.

VIDEO: De Bruyne, Sterling combine to score stunning goal

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Title-chasing Manchester City turned on the style early on at Crystal Palace on Sunday.

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Kevin De Bruyne sent forward one of his textbook through balls to Raheem Sterling, and the winger clipped home a delightful shot into the far corner to put City ahead.

It was a sumptuous ball and finish, as Pep Guardiola could only look on and applaud two of his superstars.

Check out the incredible goal in the video above.

Raheem Sterling’s racism combat plan: Win the game

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Amid increased visibility on racism across world soccer, Manchester City star Raheem Sterling is taking a stand. A stand on the field.

When asked if he would walk off the pitch in the event he was racially abused during a game, Sterling said he would rather stay on, because he has the power to hit the racists where it hurts the most.

“I wouldn’t personally agree with walking off,” Sterling said. “I would rather go and win the game because that would hurt them even more. They’re trying to get you down, if you do walk off the pitch as a group then that makes them win. If you score a goal to win the match, then that’s even a better feeling which beats them.”

A number of incidents across Europe over the past few months has pushed racism at football matches back to the forefront of the conversation. A number of England internationals reported they were racially abused at the away match against Montenegro during the last international break, while recent incidents at Chelsea and

“My mum taught me how to love myself, how to love my skin color and how to be comfortable in my skin,” Sterling said. “Some people can’t take it but I was always told to love myself and who I am. When I do feel something’s not right I want to speak about it. If more players speak out then the better it will be.”

England international Danny Rose, a teammate of Sterling’s with the England national team, said a few days ago that he “can’t wait to see the back of” professional soccer after being frustrated with the lack of action against racism taken by authorities in Europe. Rose appeared agitated by the prevalence of the abuse and Sterling echoed his comments, saying Rose has dealt with the ugliness of the situation.

“I’ve heard stories of his past,” Sterling said. “I don’t want to go into too much detail – youth teams and stuff like that. I think it’s something he’s come across quite a number of times and it probably is getting a bit much for him. I respect his comments and it’s a shame to hear that from someone like him, not everyone’s the same, not everyone takes it the same way, to hear that it’s not really a nice thing to hear.”

Sterling has blossomed into one of the best attacking providers in Europe during his time at Manchester City, racking up 33 goals and 26 assists across the past two Premier League campaigns. The increased visibility has only brought increased pressure across a number of fronts, but Sterling’s approach seems to be one of silent aggression, using his play on the pitch to fight those who wish to bring him down.

Danny Rose breaks silence about facing racist abuse in Montenegro

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Danny Rose has spoken emphatically and candidly about his personal feelings and career plans in breaking his 10-day silence about the racist abuse he and England’s other black players faced during the Three Lions’ game in Montenegro last month.

[ MORE: Bonucci criticized for saying Kean “50-50” to blame for racist abuse ]

While the likes of manager Gareth Southgate and players Raheem Sterling and Callum Hudson-Odoi chose to speak about the incident in the minutes immediately following the final whistle, Rose says he wanted to keep his thoughts to himself and speak with a number of important figures in his life before going public with his thoughts.

While his manager and some of his teammates weren’t aware of the racist chanting which had been taking place until the game’s second half, Rose was acutely aware of what was happening, though he says he didn’t bring it up to Southgate at halftime — quotes from the Telegraph:

“I spoke to Gareth after the game and he hadn’t been aware (of the racism). I didn’t mention it at halftime, so he wasn’t aware of what was happening until he heard it right at the end.

“The manager was a bit upset to be fair, because he told us it was the first time he’d been involved with something like that and he said he didn’t know what the right course of action was. He said he was fully behind me if we wanted to walk off. I just wanted to get the three points and get out of there as quickly as possible.”

Southgate offered nothing but full backing to his players after the game, striking the perfect balance of anger over the events and the feeling of failure given the level of responsibility he feels as someone in a position of prominence and power.

[ MORE: PL clubs top $341 million in fees paid to player agents ]

It’s not the first time Rose has dealt with racism while playing for England. As a member of the U-21 team for a trip to Serbia in 2012, a similar incident occurred which had Rose prepared for — and expecting — more of the same this time around. Serbia was fine all of $85,000 by UEFA and forced to play one game behind closed doors.

“I sort of prepared myself for what happened. We won and now we just wait for whatever punishment if any punishment happens.

“I wasn’t upset. I just didn’t want the focus to be on me and about a small — I have to say it was only a small — minority of the fans doing the chanting. I didn’t want the post-match to be about me. I just wanted everybody to focus on a great week we’d had with England. We scored 10 goals and it was a great performance over two games. I just didn’t want to speak and put any focus on me, that’s all.

“I played in Serbia about eight years ago and it happened there. So I sort of thought it would be a possibility that it might happen again (in Montenegro) and it did. So yes, it happened. I looked up straight away in the first half and I know the exact time it happened in the first half.

“But it didn’t affect my game. I’m a big boy now and I know that three points are obviously not the most important thing when you’re going through something like that, but I just wanted the team to get three points so that we could move on and get out of Montenegro as quickly as possible.”

[ MORE: Sterling pays for 550 students from his old school to attend FA Cup semi ]

As for what must be done to rid the game of racism, Rose believes the game’s various governing bodies must begin to take the issue seriously, beginning with punishments befitting the crime.

“When countries only get fined what I’d probably spend on a night out in London, what do you expect? When the punishment is not as harsh, what do you expect?

“You see my Tottenham manager (Mauricio Pochettino) get banned for two games for just being confrontational against [referee] Mike Dean at Burnley. But yet a country can only get fined a little bit of money for being racist. It’s just a bit of a farce at the minute. So that’s where we are at in football and until there’s a harsh punishment there’s not must else we can expect.”

While Rose is clearly a deeply insightful individual and someone willing to meet any potential criticism head-on for speaking out about important societal issues, he was very transparent about the fact that the custodians of the game have not only failed himself and many others around the world, but also that it has him just about counting down the days until he’s ready to retire.

“I’ve had enough. At the minute, how I program myself, I just think, ‘I’ve got five or six more years left in football and I just can’t wait to see the back of it.’ Seeing how things are done in the game at the minute. I just want to get out of it.

“That’s how I feel. I feel I’ve got five or six more years left and I just want to enjoy football as much as I can. There is so much politics and whatever in football, and I just can’t wait to see the back of it, to be honest.”