Sebastian Lletget

Photo by Tim Vizer / AFP

USMNT player ratings from Uruguay draw

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The United States men’s national team did not shine in a 1-1 draw with Uruguay on Tuesday in St. Louis, but neither the hosts nor the visitors brought anything resembling an A-team to the party.

[ MORE: Match recap | 3 things ]

That doesn’t mean there wasn’t some decent entertainment along the way, and we’ll let you know who took their chance to stand out of a lesser soiree to get another look when the A-listers arrive at the front door.

Starting XI

Brad Guzan — 5 — The one-time surefire replacement for Tim Howard did nothing to say he should move up the pecking order, even in the wake of Zack Steffen‘s continued poor distribution choices in a U.S. shirt.

Reggie Cannon (Off 75′) — 6 — Just fine. Not a wide pest for the opposition as we’ve seen in the past, but he had to be a little more defensive with Long to his left.

Aaron Long (Off 65′) — 4 — A terrible international break for the Red Bulls star, who was front-and-center for three opposition goals in five days. Will the mauler rebound during the CONCACAF Nations League next month?

Tim Ream — 7 —  Ream was very good, bailing out Brad Guzan for first half spillage. Oddly enough, he made several incisive passes look easy — including one that led up to Morris’ goal — but sent Aaron Long running on easier sideways passes. Sports!

Sergino Dest (Off 70′) — 5 — Made his fair share of 18-year-old mistakes again but the flashes of brilliance, everyone, they are just… so… darn… bright. It will be a big blow for the USMNT if he ultimately chooses the Netherlands.

Jackson Yueill — 6 — Was neither incredible, nor poor, and hit a couple of eye-opening passes to free his wingers. But what he did do was show that we ought to see what he can do in the holding midfield role rather than keep giving 75-90 minute turns to Wil Trapp.

Cristian Roldan — 7 — Allowed to run his shorts off without the focus of acute attacking third responsibilities, the Sounders man probably had his best game in a U.S. shirt.

Sebastian Lletget — 7 — He’s better than most people realize, and delivered a number of creative passes and moments of vision which are becoming staples of his game. Hopefully we get the chance to see him interacting with a midfield including McKennie or Pulisic more often (or even show that he’s good enough centrally to keep Pulisic at his pulsating best position of wing).

Tyler Boyd (Off 65′) — 5 — A couple good crosses and 1v1 dribbles, but ultimately his sophomore call-up qualifies as a small slump.

Josh Sargent (Off 75′)  — 6 — The hometown hero did plenty of good at the ballpark of his favorite baseball team. Could’ve won a penalty if the referee used his eyes efficiently.

Jordan Morris (Off 85′)  — 7 (MOTM) — A really nice night for the Sounders star, who is working really well as a winger. Some terrific crosses and vision could’ve led to a goal before he bodied one home to tie the score late.

Jordan Morris scores past Uruguay goalkeeper Fernando Muslera . (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Substitutes

Corey Baird (On 65′) — 6 — Some decent moments on the wing, but still a mile away from being a starting-caliber option.

Miles Robinson (On 65′) — 6 — The Atlanta United youngster was barely troubled during his half-hour (ish) of time.

Daniel Lovitz (On 70′) — 6 — Same as Robinson.

Nick Lima (On 75′) — 7 — There are times when you think Nick Lima should be in a righteous fight with DeAndre Yedlin for starting right back status (when Berhalter isn’t using Tyler Adams in the spot), and Tuesday was one of them. Right place, right time for the late assist.

Gyasi Zardes (On 75′) — 6 — The anti-hero a national program needs. Yes, you’re in a lot of trouble if he’s your regular starting center forward, but he’s a match-up problem athletically and goes to the dirty areas to finish chances. Is there a place for him if Jozy Altidore, Josh Sargent, and Tim Weah are healthy? No, probably not (but he’ll be there).

Paxton Pomykal (On 85′) — n/a — Congrats on the debut, kid. Wish we could’ve seen more of you.

How will the USMNT line up v. Chile?

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Gregg Berhalter has little choice but to shake up his USMNT side following Thursday’s 1-0 defeat of Ecuador in an international friendly.

[ MORE: USMNT-Chile preview ]

Weston McKennie is injured and Tyler Adams has headed back to RB Leipzig to kickstart the changes for the manager, who is 3-0 without conceding a goal in his short tenure as USMNT boss.

It’s a safe bet to say we’ll see Nick Lima in Adams’ role, the Quakes defender getting that treatment in January and doing well with it.

As for McKennie, it’s difficult to imagine this won’t be a spot for LA Galaxy man Sebastian Lletget to spread his wings against a tough and tested La Roja midfield.

Will Sean Johnson get another cap against Chile? The New York City FC goalkeeper kept a clean sheet against Ecuador, but this could be a day for Club Brugge’s Ethan Horvath (especially with Jesse Gonzalez starting for FC Dallas at the weekend before returning to camp).

We see this going one of two ways: a small batch of changes but plenty of Berhalter’s mainstays starting, or nearly every starter short of John Brooks and Christian Pulisic changing places with someone on the bench.

Will Jordan Morris and Paul Arriola reprise their wing roles around Gyasi Zardes, or is it a chance for DeAndre Yedlin and Corey Baird to work with LAFC’s Christian Ramirez? Is Wil Trapp still Berhalter’s preferred guy at holding mid, or will Michael Bradley get a start against Vidal and Aranguiz (presuming that they start)?

We expect

Minimal changes

Horvath

Lima — Long — Brooks — Ream

Roldan — Trapp

Pulisic

Arriola — Zardes — Morris

Lots of changes

Horvath

Lima — Brooks — Miazga — Lovitz

Lletget — Bradley

Pulisic

Yedlin — Ramirez — Baird

Educated guess

Horvath

Lima — Miazga — Brooks — Ream

Lletget — Bradley

Pulisic

Yedlin — Morris — Arriola

Who stands to gain or lose the most in USMNT camp?

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The USMNT will convene for Gregg Berhalter’s second camp in charge of the national squad as the international break temporarily brings a halt to most club competitions.

Leading towards international friendlies against Ecuador and Chile five days apart on Thursday and next Tuesday, the camp will provide Berhalter another opportunity to see what the national team talent pool can potentially provide him and get a look at players he will have to make decisions on ahead of more high-leverage matches. There will be experimentation, Berhalter has confirmed, and players will get a chance to make an impression.

With some players involved in aforementioned tinkering while other players sit in precarious club situations, who stands to gain the most this camp, and who could be facing their last chance to make an impression?

Most to gain

1) Tyler Adams

The former New York Red Bull midfielder has enjoyed a positive start to life in the German top flight, and could bring his good form back to the national team camp. That’s not the focus of his national team situation, however.

Gregg Berhalter confirmed that he will experiment with Adams at right-back during this week-long stretch, a curious idea with the possibility of Adams being minimized at his best midfield position in Berhalter’s setup. Many are predicting Berhalter to eventually settle on a 4-3-3 formation, which could force him into a different role. When asked if moving him out wide could minimize his ball-winning strengths, Berhalter didn’t sound terribly convinced of the idea yet, but was hopeful the coaching staff will eventually be rewarded for their creativity.

“This is the beginning phases and we want to test it and we want to see how it looks and we want to see how he adapts and what it gives our team overall,” Berhalter said. “When you’re looking at the profile of a Michael Bradley or a Wil Trapp – a very controlling player – and you have the dynamic guy next to him in Tyler who can come inside and still be influential from that position, we think it’s exciting and we want to take a look at it. It may not work exactly as we have planned and we have to adapt but in theory it’s something worth trying.”

Adams, therefore, could gain a lot this camp. While he’s already a bright young talent with a clear place on the squad no matter the eventual formation used in games that matter, Adams could stamp his place in a team in a position of weakness should the experiment pay off.

2) Sebastian Lletget

With the comeback from his brutal 2017 injury finally complete having appeared in the last four national team matches off the bench, Sebastian Lletget could be primed for his first national team start in over two years, and this is the perfect chance to show off his usefulness to the new boss. Lletget has started the 2019 MLS season well, a completely dominant force in the Galaxy’s 3-2 win over Minnesota United on Saturday, completing 77/83 passes in a creative attacking role and scoring the eventual winning goal.

Lletget is a perfect fit for the 4-3-3 as a controlling winger who can pinch inside and cause havoc on and off the ball, or use his speed to create space and deliver a cross from the flank. If he performs at a high level this camp – and he should see ample time on the wing given the makeup of the roster – it could be a breakout point for the 26-year-old in the prime of his career during this World Cup cycle.

3) Jordan Morris

Morris has not made an appearance for the USMNT since January of 2018 due to injury, but now he’s back in the fold. It couldn’t come at a better time, with Morris in excellent form to start the 2019 MLS season. The 24-year-old has three goals and an assist through the team’s first three league matches amidst a perfect start for Seattle.

With Josh Sargent and Tim Weah both involved in U-23 Olympic qualifying, this seems the perfect opportunity for Morris to re-insert himself into the USMNT forward conversation in front of the new boss.

Most to lose

1) Tim Ream

With Fulham floundering towards relegation in the Premier League amidst a historic defensive calamity, Tim Ream has been at the center of the Whites’ struggles at the back. At 31 years old and the next World Cup still three years away, it’s possible that this is Ream’s last opportunity to state his case at the national team level. He was Fulham’s best player just a year ago in their promotion campaign, rock solid at the back for essentially the entire season, but as he finds life difficult in the English top flight, anything short of a perfect camp could see Ream flushed out of the setup.

2) DeAndre Yedlin

Anything gained by Tyler Adams in this camp would be DeAndre Yedlin’s loss. The incumbent first-choice right-back suddenly has competition from an experimental adversary, and that could mean Yedlin finds himself in no-man’s land. Berhalter said that they would push Yedlin further up the field into a winger role to accommodate Adams, but a player being moved from his natural position to make way for an experiment is never a good sign.

Yedlin has plenty to gain by performing well in his new role, but he has more to lose should it go poorly and Adams succeeds. The Newcastle defender has worked hard on his defensive abilities over the past few years, to some marketable improvement, and so the experiment is understandable but at the same time somewhat puzzling. Should Adams make the switch with ease, Yedlin could find himself without a clear role in Berhalter’s potential 4-3-3 setup.

3) Gyasi Zardes

Still without a national team goal since 2016 and just one assist in that same timeframe, Gyasi Zardes is slowly slipping down the USMNT pecking order as others continue to step up. He has been deployed out wide continuously at the national level despite finding renewed success in a striker role at Columbus, and it’s clear it’s a weakness for him. It feels like the 27-year-old has reached a breaking point with the USMNT, and if he continues to fire blanks up front and be plagued by poor touches and questionable on-ball decision-making, he won’t be part of the 2022 World Cup conversation for much longer.

SQUAD

GK: Ethan Horvath (Club Brugge), Sean Johnson (NYCFC), Jesse Gonzalez (FC Dallas).

DEF: John Brooks (Wolfsburg), Omar Gonzalez (Atlas), Nick Lima (San Jose Earthquakes), Aaron Long (New York Red Bulls), Daniel Lovitz (Montreal Impact), Matt Miazga (Reading), Tim Ream (Fulham), DeAndre Yedlin (Newcastle United)

MIDFIELDERS (7)Tyler Adams (RB Leipzig), Michael Bradley (Toronto FC), Sebastian Lletget (LA Galaxy), Weston McKennie (Schalke), Christian Pulisic (Borussia Dortmund), Cristian Roldan (Seattle Sounders FC), Wil Trapp (Columbus Crew SC)

FORWARDS (6): Paul Arriola (D.C. United), Corey Baird (Real Salt Lake), Jonathan Lewis (New York City FC), Jordan Morris (Seattle Sounders FC), Christian Ramirez (LAFC), Gyasi Zardes (Columbus Crew SC).

Stock up/stock down: USMNT January friendlies

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Given the impressive group of USMNT players and prospects abroad, this January camp was of monumental importance for the all-MLS squad assembled by Gregg Berhalter.

Aside from goalkeeper Zack Steffen, himself headed to Manchester City in the summer, and perhaps LAFC’s Walker Zimmerman, everyone had something to prove to Berhalter and his staff: Even former longtime captain and 143-times capped Michael Bradley.

[ MORE: USMNT 2-0 Costa Rica | Player ratings ]

Consider this list of players not called into January’s camp and wins over the mostly “B teams” of Panama and Costa Rica.

Christian Pulisic, Weston McKennie, Tyler Adams, Matt Miazga, John Brooks, DeAndre Yedlin, “Timo” Weah, Josh Sargent, Bobby Wood, Ethan Horvath.

And those are just the “must” call-ups for March’s visits from Ecuador and Chile.

So keeping in mind the staff had a dozen non-friendly chances to evaluate the players on a myriad of levels, here are those who raised or lowered their stock in the matches versus Panama and Costa Rica.

Stock up

Jonathan Lewis, New York City FC (21) — Personal anecdote: I watched Akron play the University at Buffalo a couple of  times during Lewis’ lone season with the Zips, and Lewis’ electric talent leapt off the pitch. That’s a nearly essential sign if a college star has an international future.

Lewis was an impact sub for Berhalter in a similar fashion. In addition to the unteachable pace he possesses, Lewis stood up a cross that Sebastian Lletget finished for the difference-making goal against Costa Rica.

But Lewis’ pro career has been a slow burn (Dominic Torrent deployed him much more than Patrick Vieira, but still zero starts). Even with David Villa leaving NYCFC, Lewis is behind Jesus Medina, reported $9 million buy Alex Mitrita and 2018 revelation Ismael Tajouri-Shradi. He needs an outlet, and maybe former (ages ago) Akron coach and current Columbus boss Caleb Porter would be up for it?

Sebastian Lletget, LA Galaxy (26) — Lletget left the United States for West Ham United in 2009, so we saw very little of his development. He became, in fact, a curiosity thanks to his making just one senior appearance in West London.

Upon his MLS debut with LA, though, it became clear there was something very good here. Lletget scored for the USMNT in his third cap before suffering a Lisfranc injury and missing 18 months. He scored on Saturday — in the same venue in which he was hurt — and was perhaps the most composed player in a U.S. jersey.

His ability to play anywhere in the midfield is huge, and Berhalter will love what he’s seen from the veteran.

Michael Bradley, Toronto FC (31) — The short- and long-term future of the midfield runs through Tyler Adams and Weston McKennie, but Bradley’s performance against Panama — as poor as Los Canaleros were — shows he’s going to be someone who has in him at least another World Cup cycle as a contributor. Think a rich man’s “Kyle Beckerman in the 2018 qualification cycle.” Even if he is not starting, his experience and engine combine to make for a tremendous asset.

Bonus positives: Djordje Mihailovic, Chicago Fire (20). Steffen (23).

(Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Stock questionable?

Let’s first put a list of players who, unless there were unreported injuries, couldn’t get many minutes, if any, for Berhalter: Reggie Cannon, Auston Trusty, Marky Delgado, Mark McKenzie, Keegan Rosenberry, Justen Glad, Kellyn Acosta, Tyler Miller.

Most of this bunch is quite young, so it’s hard to say they aren’t for the future. Delgado, Acosta, and Rosenberry are the biggest eyebrow-raisers given their age and importance to their current clubs.

Stock down

Corey Baird, Real Salt Lake (23) — A lot of astute soccer minds love Baird because he’s very good positionially, and that’s true, but this is also a player who was the 18th rated Real Salt Lake player last season despite producing eight goals and five assists. It’s one of those “arguments against analytics,” but he has to get goals and assists against this opposition. Instead, he was just okay. You could easily argue that the team Panama put out there would finish dead last in MLS. I need my wingers to feast on that.

Gyasi Zardes, Columbus Crew (27) — I hate the idea of piling on, and it’s silly to write off such a tantalizing and industrious talent when so many coaches have failed to do so, but Zardes just isn’t on the level and hasn’t been for some time outside of MLS.

While thriving in MLS usually is a gateway to torture CONCACAF, Zardes hasn’t scored in his last 13 caps. Eight of those caps were 45 minutes or more, so it’s not like he hasn’t a chance to score (He has pitched in an assist). As a center forward, hold up play is important but not as much as goals. Jozy Altidore will need to get a chance to show he should be in the group with Josh Sargent, Timothy Weah, Bobby Wood, and even Andrija Novakovich (and Jordan Morris). Not good for Gyasi.

(Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)

USMNT takes down Costa Rica (video)

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Sebastian Lletget enjoyed a dream return to Avaya Stadium, scoring a goal and providing an assist to give the U.S. Men’s National Team a 2-0 win over Costa Rica in the second of two international friendly matches ahead of the MLS season.

Lletget scored the game winning goal on a header in the 80th minute and with two minutes from time, Paul Arriola closed out a terrific performance with a goal of his own, thanks to a great through ball from Lletget. It was the first time Lletget had been back in this stadium since suffering a devastating Lisfranc foot injury in March 2017 that kept him out for 11 months. He returned to the USMNT last fall and made a big impression off the bench for new coach Gregg Berhalter on Saturday afternoon.

[READ: USMNT to face Ecuador in March]

“We talked at halftime about how it was a very difficult game, and I think in the second half, the guys rose to the challenge,” Berhalter told Fox Sports after the match. “Much more aggressive (sic), much more life, much more bravery and overall, I think it was a good lesson that we have to go for it, and the guys did a great job.”

After a passive first half, in which the USMNT turned the ball over frequently and neither team really found their passing rhythm, the U.S. came flying out of the game to start the second stanza. Right winger Corey Baird and left back Nick Lima each had decent crosses into the middle in the first few minutes, before midfielder Christian Roldan had a terrific chance in the box that he turned wide.

During this time, holding midfielder Wil Trapp was consistently finding Arriola in space down the left wing, a position where Arriola excelled despite being a natural right-footed player. In the 54th minute, Lima rattled a shot off the post in his home stadium, and Roldan clattered the same bar with a strike in the 68th minute.

The U.S. was by far the more aggressive side but it seemed as though the game was heading for a draw until the 70th minute, when Jonathan Lewis was introduced. The young New York City FC winger swapped spots with Arriola and was a constant threat down the left side, eventually leading to the game-winning goal.

Trapp once again played a perfect long-ball into space for the speedy Lewis to run on to. Lewis then took on his defender and looped a cross towards the far post. Lletget rose highest and angled home a header past goalkeeper Estaban Alvarado to finally break the deadlock.

Lewis nearly set up the USMNT again with some nifty dribbling and speed down the left, but his cross was cleared away. Finally, in the 88th minute, Arriola put the cherry on top of the win with a calm flick over Alvarado off a Lletget through ball. Arriola crashed into Alvarado and the ground after his chip but he seemed fine and was ready to celebrate with his teammates as the ball rolled into the net.

Up next for the U.S. is a friendly match in Orlando, Fla on March 21 against Ecuador. For the first time, the next window will give Berhalter the opportunity to call in a full strength side, and it will be interesting to see how he teaches his ideas and style of play to the European and Liga MX-based players in a much shorter time span, as well as playing against opponents with full squads of their own.

After a long January USMNT camp and a pair of wins, it feels that there’s a bit of positive momentum again behind the national team. Yes, both wins were against teams without their best players available, but the USMNT players quickly adapted to Berhalter’s style of play, and the dynamism shown in the second half, “going for it” as Berhalter said, was missing from a lot of games during the later stages of World Cup qualifying in 2017, especially on the road.