solidarity payments

AP Photo/Jack Dempsey

FIFA denies solidarity payments for Dempsey, Bradley

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If you’re looking for a sentence that will enrage and stun you for a second, even if you think FIFA is the most crooked thing on Earth, just wait a few paragraphs.

FIFA has denied solidarity payments to two clubs for the development of USMNT players Clint Dempsey and Michael Bradley, according to ESPN’s Jeff Carlisle. That’s not the shocking part, considering that U.S. Soccer has a long history of not aligning with the transfer rules followed by most of the world.

[ RECAP: Bayern 1-3 (1-3 agg.) Liverpool ]

No blood, no foul. Well, at least no surprise.

But what FIFA said in denying the money to the Dallas Texans and Sockers FC Chicago is, frankly, wild even for them (The DRC in the drop quote is FIFA’s Dispute Resolution Center). From ESPN.com:

The documents didn’t specify why the cases involving Sockers FC Chicago and the Dallas Texans were turned down. One of the letters from the DRC stated that if a club wants a full explanation for its decision, it must pay FIFA a fee of nearly $10,000.

I suppose I could write a lot more simply by riffing on that facr, but I’m not going to do that. That’s enough for one night.

But the ESPN report, citing an expert, speculates that Bradley and Dempsey’s unkempt player passports — a U.S. Soccer problem now rectified with current youth players — is the reason for denial.

FIFA transfer reforms target $400M for lower-tier clubs

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren
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ZURICH (AP) — FIFA believes it can direct up to $400 million each year toward clubs worldwide entitled to a share of transfer fees paid for their former players.

FIFA says a key part of intended transfer market reforms will “ensure clubs are adequately rewarded for training players.”

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Since current transfer rules were updated in 2001, clubs have been due training compensation and solidarity payments from transfers paid in the careers of players they helped nurture.

FIFA acknowledges the “overly complicated and burdensome” system of calculating payments is understood by too few clubs.

A clearing house will aim to process transfer payments more efficiently.

FIFA research suggests tens of millions of dollars were paid to clubs last year instead of their entitlement of at least $350 million.

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