Steve Cherundolo

Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images

Cherundolo to assist USMNT on next international break

Leave a comment

One of the United States men’s national team’s most successful players is getting the chance to coach his alma mater.

According to The Washington Post’s Steven Goff, former Stuttgart assistant and longtime USMNT defender Steve Cherundolo will be on staff for the Yanks during the upcoming international break.

[ RECAP: Man City 6-1 Saints ]

Interim coach Dave Sarachan is making the most of the drawn out search to name a full-time coach by integrating both new players and coaches into the fold.

The U.S. plays England on Nov. 15 and Italy four days later. Goff reports that the USMNT will release its roster on Monday.

Cherundolo, 39, earned 89 caps with the USMNT during a 15-year career with Hannover 96 which saw the American named captain of the Bundesliga club.

He made three World Cup rosters and was nicknamed the “Mayor of Hannover” by fans of the German club.

Stuttgart was promoted last season, and Cherundolo joined the staff in January to help them survive a relegation battle. They did, but the club flipped its staff early this season and sits bottom of the table.

Cherundolo makes step up to Stuttgart assistant manager

AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File
Leave a comment

U.S. men’s national team legend Steve Cherundolo is well on his way to landing a job as a first-team manager in Europe well before he turns 45 (maybe 40, even), after being named assistant manager at Bundesliga side Stuttgart on Tuesday.

[ MORE: USMNT draws first friendly of 2018 | Player ratings ]

The 38-year-old’s move away from Hannover, where he served as interim assistant manager in 2014 before taking the reins as the club’s U-17 coach the following season, represents not only a massive step up in import, but also a massive step outside his familiar surroundings.

Having spent his entire 16-year playing career at Hannover before immediately transitioning into a coaching role with the club, it’ll be genuinely jarring to see Cherundolo in another club’s colors — from Stuttgart’s announcement:

“Steven Cherundolo was most recently coach of the Under 17 selection from Hannover 96. The 87-time US-international was a professional in Lower Saxony from 1999 until 2014, making 302 Bundesliga and 68 second-flight appearances for Hannover. The now 38-year-old is Hannover’s all-time record appearance maker in Germany’s top-flight. From 2010 until ending his active playing career in 2014, Cherundolo was H96 captain.”

[ MORE: David Beckham’s Miami team is finally official ]

Cherundolo’s name has been mentioned when speculating about the next boss of the USMNT, but at this point of his career, it would likely be more beneficial to continue honing his skills on the daily grind of the club level. Having started out as an assistant for Hannover’s reserve and then the U-15s, he’s shown an incredible hunger to put in the work required to climb the managerial ladder.

A way-too-early look at what’s next for the USMNT

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell
5 Comments

“What we’ve got here is failure to communicate. Some men you just can’t reach. So you get what we had here last week, which is the way he wants it. Well, he gets it. I don’t like it any more than you men,”

Captain, “Cool Hand Luke”

(It made us sick typing that headline, too).

So, about qualifying for that 2022 World Cup in Qatar…

It’s difficult to turn our attention beyond the short-term devastation and long-term problems that come from failing to qualify for a World Cup, especially in the forgiving world of CONCACAF qualifying.

[ MORE: 3 things | Player ratings ]

For one thing, it’s challenging not to wallow in the disappointment of what is likely a humiliating exclamation point placed on the glittering USMNT careers of Clint Dempsey, Tim Howard, Michael Bradley, and Geoff Cameron.

The last two will play a bit longer and have some chance of playing a bit part in the next round of World Cup qualifying, but Dempsey and Howard are almost certainly on the verge of their testimonials.

Then there’s the batch of players who won’t get their first taste of the World Cup. Christian Pulisic won’t be able to showcase himself at the age of 19, building up some experience for his prime. Weston McKennie, DeAndre Yedlin (a second for him), Ethan Horvath, and Matt Miazga can’t garner time, either.

Which brings us to the what’s next. Bruce Arena has to be gone. He shouldn’t get another minute on the job. Yes, he’s a legend who managed the team to its longest World Cup run. He also essentially admitted there were better players he’d call in for the World Cup should he got there.

Even ignoring that he also coached one of its most embarrassing tournaments (World Cup 2006) in addition to this fiasco, he has to leave the gig. If you want to debate this for some reason, let’s not waste everyone else’s time. Email nicholas.mendola@nbcuni.com.

I hate that this picture of classy CB Matt Besler exists (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Here’s one thing to remember: A lot of desperate people are going to try to tell you everything is okay. It brings us to the lines so famously uttered by Strother Martin and sampled by Axl Rose in “Civil War.” It’s not good when power reaches a point where it dismisses failure as happenstance or bad luck when it so clearly is, well, failure and the product of design.

U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati is a powerbroker and has had some terrific success guiding the American ship, but the worst thing American soccer can do right now is assume “it could be worse.”

Hardly! And, in fact, perhaps some of us should’ve said that when Arena was hired to replace Jurgen Klinsmann. We rely on the familiar far too often when it comes to American soccer.

I mean LISTEN to this guy, as if the side hasn’t been below its own standards and expectations for the majority of play since the end of the Copa America Centenario:

And we — myself included — are so antsy to celebrate Major League Soccer that we make huge excuses for it. Sure, MLS is improving other players in CONCACAF, but the league is also largely American. And it’s not about those Costa Rican, Jamaican, T&T, or even U.S. kids getting better, it’s more about accepting America’s best talents coming home to play in MLS rather than challenging themselves in much better leagues.

You can love MLS, love the USMNT, and accept that they both need each other to improve but also need to eschew the easy option. Maybe Michael Bradley and Alejandro Bedoya just naturally got a little worse when they came home because of natural career decline, or maybe it was about not playing against better competition. Matt Besler choosing to stay home at Sporting KC instead of trying his hand at Fulham or Sunderland was great for us as MLS fans, but did he reach his potential? Right now, it’s a bit too easy to say no (or yes).

If someone lives to the ripe age of 75, they maybe get 16-17 chances to be cognizant of their nation’s play in a World Cup. We’re set to miss one. RIP.

So, uh, back to the path forward.

They deserved better. Turned out to be lousy vacation usage(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Let Arena resign, hire a new coach… And let’s stop with the also-rans. If you need to be an America-first guy, go for Peter Vermes (Sporting KC) or Greg Vanney (Toronto FC). Talk to Tata Martino about leaving Atlanta United, and have a guy who understands MLS but also will work to get his players in great spots. Or find an alum to keep driving the technical bus. What’s Steve Cherundolo doing? Tab Ramos? Claudio Reyna? Yes, you may find a coach who does some things that bother you tactically, but at least you won’t be looking clueless in a must-win match at Trinidad and Tobago.

Build up to Brazil… While the United States is playing friendlies for the next two years, it needs to let its new coach and a bevy of new faces go through their international growing pains ahead of the 2019 Copa America in Brazil.

That team shouldn’t be about a bunch of wily vets trying to manufacture a positive result. It should be about seeing what Miazga, McKennie, Cameron Carter-Vickers, Cristian Roldan, Kenny Saief, and Sebastian Lletget can do against top international competition. With loads of love and respect to Besler, I don’t need to see him mark Neymar.

Get over yourself… The road to a World Cup should be a relative cakewalk for the United States given its talent, which regularly qualifies for major tournaments at the youth level. (And for goodness’ sake, can we please stop with the “CONCACAF is hard” lip service and walk around like a team that knows it’s going to work hard enough to maximize its talent and prevail?).

Well, that means recognizing that the U.S. Soccer Academy system has to be nurtured, and the right top-to-bottom focus should be implemented so the concept of an American team missing out on an Olympics or World Cup at any age level is a thing of the past.

Perhaps this is an argument for bringing in an outsider, someone who is going to say, “I’ve seen it all, and you’re not as good as you think you are.” Kid, try your hand on a bigger club. Veteran, here’s a role you might not like. Not on board? Cool, we’ll find someone else.

November 2019… Ugh. That’s a long way away, but shortly after the Copa America, the U.S. will begin World Cup qualifying again with a fourth round against a decent team, a below average team, and an poor team.

How many surefire guys do we know at this point? Here’s a preliminary look, with ages at that time in parentheses.

(Goalkeeper)

Yedlin (26) — Brooks (26) — (CB2) — (LB)

 Arriola (24) — McKennie (21) — (CM2) — Pulisic (21)

Wood (27) — Altidore (29)

That’s really not bad.

You’d say Miazga (24) is the front-runner at CB, Carter-Vickers (21) is in the mix too, and Cameron could still be in the fold for that spot or CM2. Bradley isn’t an improbable option there either, nor is Kellyn Acosta. Jordan Morris will hopefully have a claim toward Altidore’s spot, and Haji Wright is one to watch in Europe. Horvath and Bill Hamid are among the goalkeepers who could get looks.

Left back in America is a death spiral. Just assume teams will be ruining Hex matches and World Cup thoughts from that spot (you’ll notice the two goals versus T&T originated from room on that side).

By then the team should be teething several of Tyler Adams (CM), Josh Sargent (FW), Tim Weah (FW), Jonathan Lewis (FW), Matthew Olosunde (DF), and Jonathan Gonzalez (MF).

It doesn’t feel good right now, and it won’t for some time. The interconfederation playoffs are gonna sting, the World Cup draw is gonna be a throat punch, and the tournament itself will carry emotional paper cuts every time you see Alberth freaking Elis dribbling at a world class defense.

But stinging is good if it’s antiseptic. And U.S. Soccer better have some important people ready to flip the script.

U.S. Soccer Hall of Fame ballot revealed, including Beckham

Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images
1 Comment

CHICAGO (AP) David Beckham, the English midfielder who brought increased visibility to American soccer and won a pair of Major League Soccer titles while playing for the LA Galaxy from 2007-12, is among 12 first-time candidates on the 33-player ballot for the U.S. National Soccer Hall of Fame.

Defender Steve Cherundolo, midfielder Pablo Mastroeni and forward Brian Ching, key parts of the U.S. national team, also are new candidates on the ballot announced Wednesday. Other first-timers include defenders Chris Albright, Danny Califf and Tina Frimpong Ellertson; goalkeepers Joe Cannon and Kevin Hartman, and midfielders Amado Guevara, Eddie Gaven and Leslie Osborne.

Defender Chris Armas and midfielder Jason Kreis, currently Orlando’s coach, are in their final year of eligibility. Former midfielder Ben Olsen, now D.C. United’s coach, is among the holdovers.

Other men on the ballot include goalkeeper Pat Onstad; defenders Gregg Berhalter, Frankie Hejduk and Tony Sanneh; midfielders Chris Klein, Eddie Lewis and Steve Ralston; and forwards Jeff Cunningham, Clint Mathis, Jaime Moreno, Ante Razov, Taylor Twellman and Josh Wolff.

Women on the ballot include goalkeeper Briana Scurry; defenders Kate Sobrero Markgraf and Heather Mitts; midfielder Aly Wagner; and forward Tiffeny Milbrett.

Voting will take place among men’s and women’s national team coaches, Major League Soccer and National Women’s Soccer league management, U.S. Soccer Federation leadership, Hall of Famers and media. Each voter can list up to 10 players, and a player must appear on at least 66.7 percent of ballots to earn election.

Among those on the builder ballot are former USSF President Bob Contiguglia; referee Esse Baharmast; coaches Gene Chyzowych, Eddie Firmani, Gordon Jago and Joe Machnik; and administrators Richard Groff, Tim Leiweke, Francisco Marcos and Kevin Payne.

The 15-player veteran ballot, voted on only by Hall of Famers, has George Best, Chico Borja, Mike Burns, John Doyle, Marco Etcheverry, Linda Hamilton, Mary Harvey, Chris Henderson, Dominic Kinnear, Shep Messing, Cindy Parlow, Tiffany Roberts, Mike Sorber, Tisha Venturini-Hoch and Roy Wegerle.

The hall’s building in Oneonta, New York, closed in 2010. A new facility in Frisco, Texas, is under construction and slated to open in 2018.

Report: Hannover, Stuttgart interested in U.S. center back

Photo by Dustin Bradford/Getty Images
Leave a comment

FC Dallas’ exceptional center back duo could be broken up if a couple German clubs have anything to say about it.

Walker Zimmerman and Matt Hedges have impressed in MLS, both earning call-ups to the United States men’s national team.

[ MORE: USMNT learns Gold Cup draw ]

Zimmerman, 23, is the younger of the two, and Metro New York reporter Kristian Dyer says a source tells him that a pair of Bundesliga hopefuls are on his tail.

Neither Hannover nor Stuttgart are strangers to American talent. Longtime USMNT fullback Steve Cherundolo captained Hannover and is the current assistant manager, while Stuttgart boasts young American winger Julian Green.

Stuttgart leads the 2.Bundesliga table, while Hannover is in third. The third-place team in the final table will face the third-worst team in the Bundesliga in a playoff for a spot in the top flight.

MLSSoccer.com has a response from FCD:

“It does not surprise me that teams from all over the world are paying attention, and are interested in FC Dallas players,” FCD technical director Fernando Clavijo said in a statement to MLSsoccer.com.