Teresa Noyola

Canadian SA responds to brutal allegations from women’s players

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Can you imagine, even for a second, Mexican World Cup hero Guillermo Ochoa being threatened with his national team status for filing a law suit? Do you think it’s reasonable to think legal action from Yohan Cabaye or Paul Pogba could end up costing France a chance to host the World Cup?

That’s what a law suit from a group of international female players alleges, only with the genders flipped. One month after a group spearheaded by Abby Wambach and Nadine Angerer filed a law suit to get next summer’s World Cup on turf, the Canadian Soccer Association is being forced to answer allegations that threats have been made against several top women’s players in regards to their association with the legal action.

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Canada Soccer says the allegations are “completely baseless.” Here’s what the players are saying.

From the Associated Press:

The players allege that Mexican international Teresa Noyola and French internationals Camille Abily and Elise Bussaglia had been threatened with reprisals.

Noyola, according to the filing, was told she would not be invited to play for the Mexican national team unless she withdrew her name from the legal challenge. Abily and Bussaglia “were led to believe that their continued participation in this action would lead to retaliation by FIFA in the awarding of the 2019 women’s World Cup.”

France is seeking to host the 2019 World Cup.

All three have since pulled out of the complaint, although lawyers for the group said 20 players have stepped forward to replace them.

The players also allege that Costa Rican internationals Diana Saenz and Katherine Alvarado, along with a third unidentified player, were told by Costa Rican Federation officials “that their participation put their positions on the team in jeopardy as a result of pressure from CSA and FIFA.”

If true in any way, it’s truly aggravating. I’m not in the crowd that says it’s crazy and hurtful that FIFA isn’t overhauling the turf.  But this is terribly uncool just to read, let alone have it be fact.

2013 NWSL team preview: Seattle Reign FC

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Over the next two days, ProSoccerTalk will be providing quick capsules of the eight teams participating in the new National Women’s Soccer League. Next up: Seattle Reign FC.

Earlier today we talked to Laura Harvey, the former Arsenal Ladies manager who has recently seen ‘general manager’ added to her head coach’s responsibilities in Seattle. The 32-year-old is used to the dual role, her job in London asking her to build as well as coach the squad, but with Harvey abruptly taking on the extra duties after Amy Carnell resigned on Monday, there is a sense of disorganization emanating from Reign FC. If the club carries similar problems into the regular season, road games at Chicago, Portland and Kansas City will punish them ahead of their home opener on May 4.

Unfortunately, scheduling and front office transitions aren’t the only problems for Seattle. They’re not even the biggest issues. Reign FC will start the season without their three original U.S. allocations, and featuring a roster stocked in midfield but thin everywhere else, there are questions whether they can score or prevent goals.

The transition to the NWSL was always going to be difficult for a coach who had significant talent advantages in London, but thanks to some preseason misfortune, Harvey’s first task will be to revitalize hope in Seattle.

Who you know: Seattle were allocated three of the most recognizable names in U.S. women’s soccer: Hope Solo, Megan Rapinoe, and Amy Rodriguez. At the time, Seattle’s looked like one of the stronger allocations, even if Rapinoe was going to be in France until June. But then word came that Rodriguez was pregnant and out for the year. With Solo having recently undergone wrist surgery, none of the team’s big three will be with them in Chicago.

Carnell did go out and trade for Keelin Winters, a strong, all-purpose midfielder on the fringe of the U.S. Women’s National Team, but until Solo and Rapinoe return this summer, this team will lack the star power that could attract some Sounders fans to the team’s games in Tukwila.

Who you should know: Teresa Noyola is a former MAC Herman Trophy winner who will provide the creative presence in Harvey’s midfield. Christine Nairn, a Herman Trophy finalist last year, and Welsh international Jessica Fishlock can provide goals from the middle, while Canadian Kaylyn Kyle adds a deeper presence. Though it lacks headlining talent, Seattle’s midfield is as deep as any in the league.

What it means:  According to Harvey, Seattle will try to overload the middle in an attempt to make their midfield advantage decisive. The extent to which they can force their early matches into a batter of midfields will determine their survival.

If Seattle can stay within reach of the rest of the league, they’ll likely have a base to build from when their stars return. If the Reign can’t be within a couple of games (say, six-to-eight points) come mid-June, their Solo and Rapinoe aren’t likely to save them.

The first game in FC Kansas City history will take place Saturday against the Portland Thorns.


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Seattle Reign, trying to reload, bolster midfield ahead of NWSL season

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It has been a bitter-sweet beginning for the Seattle Reign. Owner Bill Predmore and general manager Amy Carnell managed to secure a place National Women’s Soccer League. Since then, it’s been a bad winter for Reign FC.

First there was the news that Megan Rapinoe would be in France until June. Everybody knew that doing into dispersal, but Seattle but got to deal with that mixed bag.

Then Amy Rodriguez became pregnant – great news for her family, bad news for the Reign. With Rapinoe gone, the U.S. national team forward was going to be counted on to carry the scoring load. Instead she’s going to miss the entire 2013 season.

Combine those losses with midfielder Teresa Noyola’s Dutch contract running through mid-June and Hope Solo’s wrist injury, and Seattle’s only had two notable moments this winter: Luring Laura Harvey from Arsenal and seeing Penn State’s Christine Nairn fall to them in the College Draft. True, these misfortunes have earned them a lot of attention (look at all the links), but Seattle would prefer to make their name on the field.

And that’s why Carnell’s getting aggressive – to give the team a chance to be more than a hard-luck team. Over the past 24 hours, the team’s been part of the first trade in league history while securing the early return of one of their best players. As a result, Seattle’s completely remake their midfield.

source:  The first move came yesterday when Seattle and the Chicago Red Stars confirmed that Keelin Winters (right), a midfielder on the cusp of some national team run, would move west along with a fourth round draft pick. In return, Chicago receives a first round draft pick and future considerations.

The future considerations seem complicated. Seattle has confirmed Chicago will received one of the Reign’s U.S. Soccer allocated players ahead of the 2014 campaign, so it seems Amy Rodriguez will be going to the Red Stars. If, for whatever reason, Rodriguez is doesn’t come back for the 2014 season, then Seattle’s going to have to send another national team player to Chicago.

Again, that’s unconfirmed speculation, but with Rodriguez’s status up in the air, it doesn’t look like this deal will be resolved until after the season; hence, the future considerations.

My first reaction to the trade: It’s a steal for Seattle. I’ve softened on that a little, but Carnell’s done well for her team. I may tend to over-value Winters, but she is a very good deep-sitting midfielder who has enough ability to function in a box-to-box role (Harvey sees her in a defensive role).

For whatever reason, Chicago saw Winters as their third-best option in the middle behind Shannon Boxx and Leslie Osborne. Even if Winters isn’t better than the two in 2013 (and she very well might be), she’s more valuable in the long run.

To get her, Carnell had to give up Seattle’s first round pick, a commodity that could turn into one of Crystal Dunn or Julie Johnston. Both college players project as future national team regulars, but they’re also defenders – not midfielders. Everybody needs defenders, of course, but for a team like Seattle in need of impact players, there’s an argument for preferring Winters over either defensive prospect.

But the duo’s also relatively unproven. Not every college star makes a smooth transition to the pro game. Even if they do, it’s no certainty they’ll be as good as Winters, who has scored seven goals in 36 games between the Boston Breakers, Seattle Sounders, and German power Turbine Potsdam since 2011.

It’s easy to fall in love with Dunn and Johnston’s potential, but it’s potential. The draft pick is a lottery ticket, one that won’t have access to those players if Seattle makes the playoffs. In my mind, it’s a one-in-three chance Seattle’s pick turns into one of those players. Factor in the probability Winters will remain a better player during the draftee’s time with her team, then the likelihood of Carnell giving away the deal’s best player becomes pretty low. It’s not enough of probability to stop this deal now.

Factor in Seattle’s needs — their desire to get some quality players in who can replace the talent they’ll miss — and Carnell made the right move. The team that was ambitious enough to pluck Harvey from Arsenal continues to be aggressive as the season approaches.

That aggression manifest again in Seattle’s other move: Securing Noyola’s early arrival. The Mexican international and former Stanford star was originally slated to finish the European campaign with ADO Den Haag; however, after a deal was reached between the clubs, the 22-year-old former U.S. youth international will join her new club after the Algarve Cup. The 2011 Hermann Trophy winner will be with Seattle for the club’s first game on April 14.

Mid-week, Seattle’s midfield was Nairn, Canadian international Kaylyn Kyle, then a significant drop. Now they’ve added Winters, somebody who can serve as an anchor centrally, and Noyola, who can team with Nairn to help augment the roster’s lack of goal scoring. If Ohio State alum Tiffany Cameron can carry over some of her NCAA goal scoring prowess (21 goals in 22 games as a senior), Seattle may have enough to survive the spring.

And that’s all they need to do. In a league where half the teams will make the playoffs, Harvey only needs to craft a team capable of surviving the spring. They need to stay within reach until Rapinoe returns.

The defense is big problem, and they’ll need some heroics from Solo if the team’s going to match the front office’s ambition. But thanks to their two most recent moves, Seattle’s back in the game. There are enough flawed teams in this league to give Seattle hope they can steal enough points to stay afloat.

If Harvey’s acumen can match her Arsenal results, the first round pick they gave up is not going to be Crystal Dunn or Julie Johnston. There are enough pieces here to avoid that worst case scenario.

Pregnant Amy Rodriguez to miss NWSL season

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So here’s a new twist for the already hamstrung Seattle Reign. The team that was allocated Megan Rapinoe (who won’t report until June) and Mexican playmaker Teresa Noyola (also contracted with a European club until June) may now be without the player expected to be their leading scorer during the upcoming campaign, though there may have been little way to foresee why U.S. Women’s National Team forward Amy Rodriguez won’t play for Reign FC this season.

Sources confirmed late Tuesday evening that Rodriguez is pregnant, with her and husband Adam expecting the couple’s first child. Seattle Reign FC later confirmed via Twitter that the 25-year-old will miss the upcoming domestic season.

“We congratulate Amy and her husband on this wonderful news,” team owner Bill Predmore said via press release late Tuesday night. “We let her know we are here to support her in any way we can and that we look forward to having her join the club in 2014.”

Putting sports aside, congratulations are in order. The parents-to-be, married since October 2011, are about to embark on a new family. On the list of things that transcend sport, this is near the top. Assuming this is relatively recent news, the joy of days like these should highlight a long life together.

But there are obvious competitive implications, both for the national team and Rodriguez’s new NWSL club.

On the international level, Rodriguez was called into Tom Sermanni’s first national team camp, and there’s no indication yet she’ll miss early March’s important Algarve Cup tournament. Perhaps as important, she won’t miss the vital training sessions and friendlies that define these first weeks under Sermanni’s stewardship. For Rodriguez, a player who was slowly losing playing time under Pia Sundhage, those first impressions are especially important.

UPDATE: Rodriguez departs national team camp, replaced by Bywaters

Come spring, Rodriguez seems set to step aside, but with the type of physical shape in which U.S. women’s national team members keep themselves, she may not miss  many national team opportunities. Christie Rampone legendarily was pregnant as player and coach for WPS’s first title winners. Rodriguez won’t replicate that feat, but if she delivers in late summer, she could be back playing before the end of the calendar year.

Her time out of the team is unlikely to make-or-break her fortunes with the national team, especially considering much of the summer’s focus will be on the domestic season. As far as the national team ambitions of the two-time Olympic gold medalist, the timing couldn’t better.

Domestically, however, the effect is obvious. Seattle loses one of their best players, and with limits on free agency, it’s unclear how the Reign can come close to replacing her probable contributions. An already mixed offseason for general manager Amy Carnell and head coach Laura Harvey just got more complicated. Whereas Seattle looked like one of the winners on allocation day, now no team in the league may be in worse shape.

“Amy’s pregnancy came as a surprise and has introduced some challenges that we are now beginning to work through,” Harvey said on Tuesday.

Expect Seattle to work with the league to determine what kind of roster and salary cap flexibility the team might get. According to the team’s Facebook, they’ve already reached agreements with three free agents and one international.

“In light of the news, we are conferring with NWSL about potential adjustments to the cap and roster,” Carnell said.

If U.S. Soccer does right by the them, Seattle may get some extra room to try and replace A-Rod.