Toronto Sun

Continental problem? Toronto columnist condemns CAF World Cup efforts

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Kurtis Larson isn’t being shy about a controversial topic, burying an entire continent worth of soccer in his new Toronto Sun column.

Claiming that the Confederation of African Football’s representatives performance early in this World Cup is endemic, Larson goes after them from Word One.

The claims begin with Yaya Toure’s infamous birthday acknowledgement problems at Manchester City, move on to Cameroon’s brief bonus-fueled boycott and slide into Alex Song’s red-card rage. In short, Larson says these awful examples show how an underperforming continent continues to disappoint.

From The Sun:

Similarly, neighboring Nigeria was embroiled in an alleged match-fixing scam during an important pre-World Cup tuneup against Scotland, a game investigators red-flagged as one organized crime might have infiltrated.

Those accusations kicked up a notch when Austin Ejide appeared to throw the ball into his own goal midway through the first half that game.

This is a federation full of cry babies, selfishness and alleged cheats.

Strong words, but certainly ones that needed to be uttered now in order to remain safe. Cameroon has been eliminated but Ivory Coast is in still in strong position to advance (having only lost to a Colombia team that looks ready to roar). Nigeria’s sickly performance against Iran may lead to elimination but they could still up-end Bosnia and Herzegovina, while Ghana’s game effort against the U.S. belies consecutive knockout round performances. And Algeria was never expected to do much.

Not saying the corruption talk is silly; it isn’t. And the cited examples are certainly very poor representations of a continent that hasn’t always covered itself in glory… but which continent has? France simply quit in the 2010 tournament, Croatia has had a player suspended from the tournament for inciting Pro-Nazi chants, and England had its high-profile captain sleep a teammate’s wife. The anti-Europe column hasn’t appeared as Spain and England crash out, though.

CAF has put a team in the knockout rounds of each of the last six World Cups, and in the quarterfinals of 3 of 6 (Ghana in 2010, Senegal in 2002, Cameroon in 1990). And while this isn’t the most shining of accomplishments, it’s also far from consistent and horrific failure. And as explored in Ian Hawkey’s “Feet of the Chameleon”, African soccer has met plenty of unique obstacles in its development.

I don’t know Larson personally, and I’ve enjoyed following him on Twitter, so I can’t and won’t accuse him of click fodder. But this seems like a reach to me. Yes, CAF is crooked, like the majority of confederations. To pick out one seems a little forced.