USA World Cup 2026

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Joint World Cup bidders: Trump hasn’t sparked voter concerns

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Organizers of the North American bid to host the 2026 World Cup insist FIFA members have not expressed concern about President Donald Trump’s harsh words about foreigners or the U.S. Justice Department prosecuting corrupt soccer officials.

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“Look, this is not geopolitics,” new U.S. Soccer Federation President Carlos Cordeiro said Monday during a conference call. “We’re talking about football and what fundamentally at the end of the day, what’s the best interests of football and our footballing community, and we’ve had no backlash. We’re very focused on the merits of our bid.”

A joint bid by the United States, Mexico and Canada was submitted to FIFA on Friday along with a proposal by Morocco. The 207 other members of the international soccer governing body will vote on June 13 in Moscow.

Cordeiro, Mexican Football Federation President Decio de Maria and Canadian Soccer Association President Steven Reed spoke from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where they were meeting with members of the Association of South East Asian Nations, a subset of the Asian Football Confederation.

A solo bid by the U.S. for the 2022 World Cup was favored going into the 2010 vote but lost to Qatar. FIFA then changed the vote rules to give the decision back to the entire membership, which chose hosts prior to 1986, when the choice started being made by the roughly two dozen members of its executive committee.

“We believe that the member associations are going to judge us on the quality of the bids, on the merits of our bid, and that’s it,” Reed said. “We’re very confident about what we’re putting forward, and I don’t think that we’re concerned about politics.”

Sixty games would be played in the U.S. under the bid plan, including all from the quarterfinals on. Three cities were included from Mexico and Canada, and both of those nations would host 10 games.

Holding a tournament in the U.S. would subject many of the documents generated to subpoena by U.S. federal prosecutors, who have secured numerous guilty pleas to corruption charges from soccer officials since 2015 and obtained convictions at trial last year against Juan Angel Napout, the former president of South American soccer’s governing body, and Jose Maria Marin, the former president of Brazil’s soccer federation.

“We haven’t had any of those concerns raised by any of the members that we’ve met so far,” Cordeiro said. “The reforms that FIFA undertook some years ago I think were spot on and we feel very confident that ultimately the right decision will be made.”

Morocco’s bid envisions spending almost $16 billion, including $3 billion to construct nine new stadiums, refurbish five others and build or renovate 130 training grounds.

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The North American bid proposed venues be selected from among 23 stadiums that exist or already are under construction, including three each in Mexico and Canada. Sixteen of the U.S. stadiums are sites of NFL teams.

“The split of matches that we have proposed to FIFA frankly reflects the resources of the three countries,” Cordeiro said. “We in the United States are blessed with some very substantial resources in terms of stadium infrastructure, of cities and so on, and that reflects the 60 matches that we have on the table. But at the end of the day there is a reason why FIFA have asked for or have encouraged joint bids and we do think that our joint bids taken together provide for a vastly superior bid than our competition.”

AP Sports Writer Rob Harris contributed to this report.

Report: U.S. 2026 World Cup bid no longer overwhelming favorite

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The United States, Mexico and Canada may very well host the 2026 World Cup. But it’s not as much of a lock as it was when the bid was first officially announced.

According to reporting by ESPN’s Sam Borden, a number of factors on and off the field has led to Morocco’s bid catching up to the U.S.-led bid for the 2026 World Cup, just a few months ahead of the vote on who will host the World Cup. The reporting states that some believe Morocco’s World Cup bid has the backing of all of Africa, South America and much of Asia, which would put it over the 104-vote threshold needed for a simple majority win.

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Other sources in the reporting state that the U.S.-led bid with Canada and Mexico is still the favorite, but the margin of victory will be much lower come the World Cup vote in June. FIFA’s entire member body of 211 nations – not including the four bidding nations and suspended Guatemala – are expected to vote at the FIFA Congress from June 12-13 in Moscow, Russia.

The U.S. missing out on the 2018 World Cup may not have helped its case, but it’s really the work of the U.S. Justice Department as well as comments by U.S. President Donald Trump that have reportedly changed the perception of a shoe-in World Cup in the USA.

Many in South America’s CONMEBOL are reportedly upset about the FBI investigation and Justice Department court cases against the former corrupt bosses of South American soccer, turning the organization upside down, while others have reportedly not taken too kindly to Trump’s travel ban of mostly Arab nations as well as some of his comments about other countries in the Caribbean and Africa.

The report states the USA-Mexico-Canada World Cup bid is going out of its way to stress the unity between the three nations when politicking with FIFA member nation executives to try and earn their votes.

It would be shocking for the U.S. to lose the bid for the 2026 World Cup, especially as the World Cup is being expanded to 48 teams and the U.S. is one of the few nations that can easily support that, but per the latest geo-political events, the vote could be closer than we had ever imagined it. Hopefully, it doesn’t come down to the last vote to know who will host the 2026 World Cup.