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SKC, Crew SC play to 0-0 draw; VAR steals the show (again)

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KANSAS CITY, KAN. — The game in 100 words (or less): Nothing ruins a good game of soccer more than controversies involving the referee — and now that VAR is active within MLS, yet another failure of the video-review system to correct the most “clear and obvious” of wrong decisions. There is no longer any rhyme or reason in deciding whether or not to utilize what could be a very helpful tool. Check the third video further down this page to comprehend the absurdity of VAR in Sporting Kansas City’s 0-0 draw with Columbus Crew SC on Sunday. As for the actual soccer which was played, Tim Melia made one save to deny Gyasi Zardes with a point-blank header early in the first half, and a second to deny Zardes rom the penalty spot just before halftime. Despite being a back-and-forth affair between the league’s second- and third-place teams with a chance to take the lead in the Supporters’ Shield race, there were just six shots on target in total and genuine scoring chances were few and far between.

[ PREVIEW: USMNT hosts Bolivia in shadows of World Cup hype ]

Three moments that mattered

43′ — Zardes wins a PK, but Melia makes the save — Melia was responsible for giving away the penalty kick, and he more than made up for it by denying Zardes moments later.

45+6′ — Higuain puts studs into Espinoza, sees red — Originally not called a foul, changed to a red card following video review. On the softer side of red cards (just an opinion).

59′ — Martinez takes a swing at Sinovic, but no video review — At this point, it’s just time to disband the entire VAR experiment. It’s turned MLS into a clown show and an embarrassment. Signed, someone who was initially in favor of VAR, assuming MLS would utilize it properly.

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Man of the match: Tim Melia

Goalscorers: None

MLS roundup: ATL’s unbeaten run at 7; TFC implode vs. Chicago

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A roundup of, plus a few quick thoughts about, all of Saturday’s action from Week 9 of the 2018 MLS season…

[ MORE: Other MLS Things — The Archive ]

Atlanta United 4-1 Montreal ImpactFULL HIGHLIGHTS

The Atlanta United buzzsaw couldn’t be runner smoother, as Tata Martino’s side improved to seven games unbeaten (six wins) with a 4-1 comeback victory over Montreal on Saturday. After going a goal behind in the 13th minute, Atlanta initially struggled to string together passes and create even a handful of half-chances. The same was true for 10 or 15 minutes of the second half before Miguel Almiron found his footing and started to take over.

The Paraguayan, like most of his teammates, finishes games stronger than he starts them, and Saturday’s two-goal performance was more of the same from the 24-year-old (he’s got 6 goals and 4 assists after eight games — he’ll be a finalist for MVP, if he sticks around past the summer transfer window). There comes a moment in just about every Atlanta game, when you can practically see their opponents’ will to continue fighting the unrelenting press and wave after wave of attacks leave their bodies, to a man. To that point, 13 of Atlanta’s league-leading 21 goals this season have been scored after the 60-minute mark.

On Saturday, Almiron netted in the 70th and 84th minute, with a pair of fantastic free kicks coming from Kevin Kratz shortly after each of Almiron’s goals.

Toronto FC 2-2 Chicago FireFULL HIGHLIGHTS

TFC returned home and responded to their CONCACAF Champions League heartbreak in the most encouraging of ways… for a brief period, which saw the Reds build a 2-0 lead after 22 minutes (Jonathan Osorio and Victor Vazquez), only to cough it up in the game’s final 25 minutes and lose a pair of much-needed points. In truth, they were quite fortunate to escape with the solitary point they managed to hold onto.

Bastian Schweinsteiger had his penalty kick effort saved by Alex Bono in the 38th minute, but the German superstar finally beat Bono in the 69th minute. Still, Greg Vanney’s side clung to its narrow lead until the final minute of stoppage time, when Alan Gordon swept home a bouncing, un-cleared ball inside TFC’s penalty area.

It’s completely understandable — and borderline expected — that TFC would come out with a sense of urgency and desperation before rapidly fading down the stretch. In that sense, the coming week will be a massive relief as it represents the season’s first period of normalcy — the chance return to a more manageable one-game routine in the coming weeks.

LA Galaxy 2-3 New York Red BullsFULL HIGHLIGHTS

Where in the world do we start with this game? There are so many ways to approach it.

There’s the obvious: the Galaxy fell 2-0 behind after failing to show up for the game’s opening 45 minutes, then came roaring back courtesy of Ola Kamara and Giovani dos Santos, then threw it all away again very late on, and lost 3-2. For the brief 10-minute period midway through the second half, Sigi Schmid’s side even looked as though they had spent all week preparing to play on Saturday.

There’s also the up-and-down performances of Zlatan Ibrahimovic, who was little more than a passenger for the entirety of the first half, before dropping a dime to Kamara and kickstarting LA’s comeback in the 59th minute.

Finally, there’s the dead horse (here and here): VAR remains an unmitigated dumpster fire. The threshold of a “clear and obvious error” continues to befuddle not only the league’s referees in their application of the video-review system, but also the league’s fans in their understanding why referees do and don’t utilize the tool. For example, New York were awarded a penalty in the 84th minute after the ball appeared to have struck the arm of Dave Romney. Upon viewing the television broadcast’s replay, the ball appeared to have hit Romney much higher on his arm (perhaps even his shoulder) than first viewing indicated. Allen Chapman didn’t review the call on the field, and Alejandro Romero scored the game-winning goal with six minutes of regular time remaining.

Elsewhere in MLS

New England Revolution 1-0 Sporting Kansas City — HIGHLIGHTS
Philadelphia Union 3-2 D.C. United — HIGHLIGHTS
Columbus Crew SC 2-1 San Jose Earthquakes — HIGHLIGHTS
Minnesota United 2-1 Houston Dynamo — HIGHLIGHTS

VAR decisions at World Cup to be explained on giant screens

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FLORENCE, Italy (AP) Fans attending World Cup matches in Russia won’t be left wondering about the reasons behind decisions of the video assistant referee.

After the VAR’s decision is made, replays will be shown on giant screens inside the stadiums accompanied by a written explanation.

It’s all part of the VAR information system that FIFA unveiled Wednesday .

[ MORE: Man Utd makes historic hire ]

FIFA will place someone in the VOR (video operations room) who will listen in to the VAR’s decisions and communicate them to both TV commentators and stadium personnel operating the giant screens.

“So we will have graphics on the giant screens, we will have replays after the decision on the giant screens, and we will also inform the fans about the outcome of a VAR incident and review,” said Sebastian Runge, group leader of football innovation at FIFA.

With the VAR making its tournament debut during the June 14-July 15 World Cup, FIFA is holding its final training camp this month for the 99 match officials – 36 referees and 63 assistants – who have been selected to go to Russia.

Thirteen VARs have been pre-selected and are being trained at Italy’s Coverciano complex, and FIFA referees chief Pierluigi Collina said more VARs and VAR assistants will be chosen from the 99 match officials.

Three of the 13 VARs come from Italy’s Serie A and two from Germany’s Bundesliga – elite competitions that already use video assistants.

The VAR can support the referee in four game-changing situations: goals and offenses leading up to a goal, penalty decisions and offenses leading up to a penalty, direct red card incidents and cases of mistaken identity.

Still, VARs in both Italy and Germany have received vehement criticism for long delays and bungled decisions this season.

On Monday, Mainz was awarded a penalty during halftime against a rival Freiburg side that had already left the pitch for the break – prompting the unusual scene of a team returning from the changing room to defend a penalty.

“Yesterday we had already discussed this incident here and gave match officials and VARs clear indication about what should be done if something similar in FIFA competition – specifically the World Cup – happens,” Collina said without providing further detail.

Collina added that the VAR should not be overused, adding that ideally it would intervene at all in a match.

“The goal of VAR is to avoid major mistakes,” Collina said. “The objective is not to have clear and obvious mistakes committed on the field of play. This is the target, the goal is not to re-referee the match using technology.

“There will continue to be incidents when a final answer will not be given and there will be different opinions,” Collina added.

Among other items involving the VAR:

MOSCOW CONTROL CENTER

FIFA will follow the Bundesliga model of a central control center for the VAR rather than using trucks outside stadiums.

“We will have all of the referees based in Moscow so there won’t be any stress in terms of travel,” Collina said.

For each match, Collina will select one VAR and three assistant VARs.

Training operation rooms presented to media included six monitors for the VARs and two more for technical assistants enabling the VARs to see requested replays.

There could be up to four technical assistants in the room for World Cup matches.

OFFSIDE CAMERAS

FIFA will install two extra cameras at matches to monitor offside decisions.

The cameras will be in addition to the 33 cameras used for broadcasters and they will be installed under stadium roofs.

Broadcasters will not have direct access to the cameras but if they are used by the VAR then broadcasters can show the video.

Runge added that three dimensional technology – considered the ultimate strategy for determining offside – is not ready for real-time access yet.

SWEAT AND STRESS

VARs will not officiate more than one match per day.

“It’s not like watching a match on the sofa sipping coffee,” Collina said.

Collina, who officiated Brazil’s 2-0 win over Germany in the 2002 World Cup final, explained why the VARs will wear track suits similar to referees’ on-pitch attire.

“The reason is at the end they sweat as much as someone on the field, because the tension is very high,” Collina said. “They can’t do two matches per day – it’s too stressful.”

COMMS AND HACKING

The Moscow control center will be connected to match officials via a fiber optic network.

If the network fails, the backup plan includes an old-fashioned land telephone line and a telephone stationed near the fourth referee for emergency use.

“Worst-case scenario includes a backup plan on site. That’s when the IBC is down – no power, no fiber network,” Runge said. “Then we have a plan in place where the fourth official would become the VAR and the fourth official would be replaced by the reserve referee.

“We have a cabin in the broadcast compound from where we send all of the feeds to the IBC anyway. That cabin can be turned into a smaller, light version of the VOR.”

Hacking has also been considered.

“We are aware that there might be something but our IT department put measurements in place that will protect us from that,” Runge said.

POST-MATCH BRIEFINGS

In extraordinary circumstances, FIFA will hold post-match briefings to explain decisions in greater detail.

“If something should happen that we think should properly and accurately be explained – and it doesn’t matter if it’s related to VAR or something different – if it is a matter to explain the background of a decision, as an exception certainly we will do it,” Collina said.

“But it won’t be a post-match press conference for every match, explaining every single decision taken during every single match.”

More AP soccer coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/apf-Soccer

Andrew Dampf on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/asdampf

Premier League clubs: No VAR in 2018-19 season

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Video Assistant Referee is coming to the Premier League, just not quite yet.

The Premier League’s clubs have opted for an additional season of review and experimentation — and also the use of VAR in both the League and FA Cups — ahead of potential implementation for the 2019-20 Premier League.

[ MORE: UCL draw | Europa draw ]

A Premier League release notes that England’s top flight will be aggregating data and expertise from all the leagues currently using VAR in their competitions before adopting a system of its own.

The World Cup will use VAR this summer in its highest profile debut yet.

According to the league:

The Clubs agreed that advanced testing will continue to the end of season 2018/19 to make further improvements to the system, especially around communication inside the stadium and for those following at home and around the world.

It all makes sense, though it will bring little relief to clubs who see their fates rise and fall with referees’ whistles and lack thereof. Then again, that’s how it’s been forever, so we’ll be happy to note the wisdom of getting it right.

“Purist” Blatter rips idea of VAR at World Cup

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I’m still not entirely comfortable with VAR at the World Cup, but Sepp Blatter’s opposition to it sure is curing what ails me.

Calling himself a “purist” — Lots of purists are cool with bribes, Joe — Blatter rebelled against the institution of Video Assistant Referee for the 2018 World Cup.

[ MORE: Toronto makes CCL Final ]

The FIFA Ethics Committee truther claims that referee unfamiliarity and fan discomfort are big issues. That makes some sense, but we can’t help but consider the source. From the BBC:

“For a purist in football, as I am, I think it is an innovation which is going too fast,” said the 82-year-old. “Most of the referees have never worked this system. To go to the World Cup and introduce this system in the World Cup, I think it is not very clever. I don’t feel comfortable, definitely not, and spectators don’t feel comfortable.”

There’s another point to be made that some of the World Cup’s most memorable moments at here and abroad would’ve been undone by VAR: Diego Maradona’s Hand of God, Frank Lampard versus Germany in 2010, and Torsten Frings’ handball against the USMNT in 2002.

Is the game better off without the controversy caused by such moments, or did they serve to add to its mystique?

There are interesting discussions to be had here. I don’t know about you but Blatter ruins many of my considerations. No more microphones, Sepp. You’re done.

That said, let’s talk about replay.