Yeltsin Tejeda

Extra time GK switch works, as Krul leads Dutch past Costa Rica in PKs

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Those pesky Ticos were at it again on Saturday in the World Cup quarterfinals, taking the Netherlands to penalty kicks at the Arena Fonte Nova.

But an unorthodox goalkeeper substitution by Louis van Gaal allowed Tim Krul to be the hero in penalty kicks, stopping two Costa Rica shooters on way to a 0-0 (4-3) win and a spot alongside Argentina, Germany and Brazil in the semifinals.

The sixth 2014 World Cup match to go to extra time had plenty of thrilling moments, most of them coming courtesy of brilliant Levante keeper Keylor Navas.

Robin van Persie missed at least three gold chances. Wesley Sneijder hammered two shots off the woodwork. Arjen Robben was a dribbling mastermind (but infuriating embellisher), dancing through Costa Rica’s stingy defense. But he was unable to find his fourth goal of the tournament.

Costa Rica manager Jorge Luis Pinto continued his masterful job by removing Los Ticos from their full-attacking ways. Instead, the Costa Rican team played for the counter. When they did scoop up the ball, their transition was strong.

And van Gaal wasn’t about to be out-managed without doing something wild, pulling off Jasper Cillessen in the 122nd minute, moments after the keeper made a great save. It would be Newcastle United’s Tim Krul to face the firing line.

To kicks, where Borges made his and Van Persie followed. Krul stopped Ruiz, and Robben finished his chance. The Columbus Crew’s Giancarlo Gonzlez scored to put the burden to Sneijder, but the Dutchman scored, too.

Bolanos and Kuyt both finished, meaning Umana would have to succeed on his chance. He didn’t. Krul made the save. The Netherlands won.

How did we get there? Here’s what we were saying at halftime.

To the second half, where Bruno Martins Indi took down Joel Campbell inside the box — and from behind — as the clock neared 60, and the case could’ve been made for a penalty. Referee Ravshan Irmatov was not swayed, however.

Wesley Sneijder nearly broke the deadlock in the 83rd minute with a flash of a free kick that bent a bit too far, striking the post before being cleared.

And van Persie had multiple chances to win it in regulation, the most grievous miss coming on a super flub in the 89th minute. Sneijder’s cross was perfect, but RVP was anticipating contact and failed to connect with the ball.

And later, in the third of four minutes of stoppage time, van Persie’s would-be winner was denied by Yeltsin Tejeda. The Costa Rican defender was on the near post to deflect the ball off the bottom of the cross bar and out.

Extra time found more shining examples of Navas at work, as Robben’s corner kick met Sneijder on the doorstep. But Navas pushed it aside, but moments later it was fear for Los Ticos. The keeper landed on Dirk Kuyt after leaping to corral a corner and needed medical attention, yet stayed on.

Los Ticos made it through the first 15 minutes of stoppage time. Netherlands continued to push Navas, but with shots and physical contact. Substitute Klaas Jan Huntelaar made contact with the keeper’s face and earned a yellow card.

Cillessen’s chance to be hero came in the 117th, when Urena broke through and ripped a low shot that the Dutch keeper booted away.

The 119th minute saw Sneijder put another shot off the bar. Wow.

In strode Krul for Cillessen and then came kicks.

Lineups

Netherlands: Cillessen, Vlaar, De Vrij, Martins Indi (Huntelaar, 106′), Blind, Van Persie (c), Sneijder, Robben, Kuyt, Wijnaldum, Depay (Lens, 76′)

Costa Rica: Navas, Acosta, Gonzalez, Umana, Borges, Bolanos, Campbell (Urena, 65′), Ruiz (c), Diaz, Gamboa (Murie, 78′), Tejeda (Cubero, 96′)

Top Ten Players of the 2014 World Cup’s Group Stage

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It’s quite a task selecting the best 10 performances from 32 teams playing three games each, but in the hard world of being employed to rank world footballers, I stand ready.

It’s especially hard not to just latch onto incredible moments and insert a player on the list. Robin van Persie’s headed goal against Spain still amazes me, but was he the driving force behind the Netherlands’ surprising group stage? Certain teams got by on defending, so does that mean one defender can rise above the rest?

[ RELATED: Complete bracket for Round of 16, more ]

Oh, shoot. Let’s just do this thing. The Top Ten players from the 2014 group stage were:

10. Gervinho, Ivory Coast – No, Les Elephants were not able to charge out of their group stage funk, but that was no fault of the electric Gervinho, who challenged back lines and midfields alike.

9. Arjen Robben, Netherlands – He’s a menace, and his motor never stops going (even during his full-energy dives). Robben drove the Dutch into the knockout rounds.

8. Enner Valencia, Ecuador – The bright spot in a disappointing tournament for La Tri, the ‘other’ Valencia has been linked with a number of Premier League sides including Newcastle United.

7. Guillermo Ochoa, Mexico – You watched the Brazil/Mexico match, right? Can you believe El Tri had coaches who didn’t suit this guy up?

source: AP6. James Rodriguez, Colombia – Absurdly-gifted and just as productive, James is one of the main reasons Colombia could emerge from the loaded CONMEBOL quadrant and into the semifinals.

5. Karim Benzema, France – If this guy played in England, he would be one of the most popular players for American audiences. He’s big, talented and hard-charging.

4. David Luiz, Brazil – So PSG is going to team Luiz up with Thiago Silva? Champions League, beware.

3. Neymar, Brazil – If there’s been more stress placed on a younger player by a host nation, we’ve yet to find him. Coming into his own during this tournament.

2. Thomas Muller, Germany – All he does is score goals, and that bullet against the United States was bordering on impossibly well-placed.

1. Lionel Messi, Argentina – Any more questions about the Atomic Ant on the international stage? He was Argentina in the group stage.

Honorable mention: Wayne Rooney, England; Yeltsin Tejeda and Bryan Ruiz, Costa Rica; Clint Dempsey, Jermaine Jones and Tim Howard, United States; Daley Blind, Robin van Persie and Memphis Depay, Netherlands; Blaise Matuidi, France; Xherdan Shaqiri and Diego Benaglio, Switzerland; Andre Ayew, Ghana; Juan Cuadrado, Colombia; Merhdad Pooladi, Iran; Serey Die, Ivory Coast; David Ospina and Jackson Martinez, Colombia; Vincent Kompany and Eden Hazard, Belgium; Ivan Perisic, Croatia; Claudio Bravo and Alexis Sanchez, Chile; Vincent Enyeama, Nigeria; Oribe Peralta, Mexico; Diego Godin and Luis Suarez, Uruguay; Islam Slimani, Algeria; Keisuke Honda, Japan; Mesut Ozil and Mats Hummels, Germany.

Revisiting our Top 100; Who are the Top 100 knockout round players?

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I love getting yelled at, and you guys sure gave it to me over the course of ProSoccerTalk’s four-part “Top 100 players of the World Cup” series before the tournament began. How could we possibly have Bastian Schweinsteiger, a guy who ended up starting one group stage game for Germany and played 20 minutes in another, at No. 77? Just absurd!

Oh, you mean you were saying that was too low? Oh, okay.

Anyway, we wanted to take a look at who remained. And I’m a glutton for punishment, so I figured I’d fill in the back end with players who are still active in the World Cup’s knockout rounds.

[ RELATED: Top five US performers during Group G play ]

[ RELATED: Three things we learned from USA-Germany ]

[ RELATED: Convinced? Klinsmann’s personnel moves keyed US advance ]

A remarkable 45 players have been either eliminated or injured, so we’ll bump all our pre-rankings forward and add in 45 newcomers.

100. Jasper Cillessen, Netherlands

99. Fabian Johnson, United States

98. Joel Campbell, Costa Rica

97. Ogenyi Onazi, Nigeria

96. Emmanuel Emenike, Nigeria

95. Dimitris Salpingidis, Greece

94. Hector Herrara, Mexico

source: AP

93. Olivier Giroud, France

92. Teofilo Gutierrez, Colombia

91. Islam Slimani, Algeria

90. Ahmed Musa, Nigeria

89. Sofiane Feghouli, Algeria

88. Sergio Romero, Argentina

87. Stefan De Vrij, Netherlands

86. Gary Medel, Chile

85. Marcelo, Brazil

84. Pablo Armero, Colombia

83. Granit Xhaka, Switzerland

82. Andres Guardado, Mexico

81. Daniel van Buyten, Belgium

80. Gonzalo Jara, Chile

79. Kevin de Bruyne, Belgium

78. Mathieu Valbuena, France

77. Matt Besler, United States

76. David Ospina, Colombia

75. Jan Vertonghen, Belgium

74. Fred, Brazil

73. Fernando Gago, Argentina

72. Chares Aranguiz, Chile

71. Eduardo Vargas, Chile

source: AP70. Dries Mertens, Belgium

69. Vincent Enyeama, Nigeria

68.  Javier Mascherano, Argentina

67. Mamadou Sakho, France

66. Yeltsin Tejeda, Costa Rica

65. Juan Cuadrado, Colombia

64. Memphis Depay, Netherlands

63. Claudio Bravo, Chile

62. Jermaine Jones, United States

61. Giorgos Karagounis, Greece

60. Yeltsin Tejeda, Costa Rica

59. Angel Di Maria, Argentina

58. Mats Hummels, Germany

57. Daley Blind, Netherlands

56. Guillermo Ochoa, Mexico

————————————-

55. Rafa Marquez, Mexico

54. Diego Benaglio, Switzerland

source: AP53. Bryan Ruiz, Costa Rica

52. Sokratis Papastathopoulos, Greece

51. Madjid Bougherra, Algeria

50. Emmanuel Emenike, Nigeria

49. Clint Dempsey, United States

48. Ezekial Lavezzi, Argentina

47. Xherdan Shaqiri, Switzerland

46. John Obi Mikel, Nigeria

45. Fabio Coentrao, Portugal

44. Thomas Muller, Germany

43. Diego Forlan, Uruguay

42. Bastian Schweinsteiger, Germany

41. Diego Godin, Uruguay

40. Vasilis Torosidis, Greece

39. Jackson Martinez, Colombia

38. Stephan Lichsteiner, Switzerland

37. Blaise Matuidi, France

36. Thibault Courtois, Belgium

35. Gokhan Inler, Switzerland

source: AP34. Oribe Peralta, Mexico

33. Michael Bradley, United States

32. Mario Gotze, Germany

31. Dirk Kuyt, Netherlands

30. James Rodriguez, Colombia

29. Paul Pogba, France

28. Marco Reus, Germany

27. Gonzalo Higuain, Argentina

26. Tim Howard, United States

25. Hugo Lloris, France

24. Oscar, Brazil

23. Javier Hernandez, Mexico

22. Per Mertesacker, Germany

21. Romelu Lukaku, Belgium

20. Dani Alves, Brazil

19. Alexis Sanchez, Chile

18. Karim Benzema, France

17. David Luiz, Brazil

16. Pablo Zabaleta, Argentina

source: Getty Images15. Neymar, Brazil

14. Radamel Falcao, Colombia

13. Toni Kroos, Germany

12. Wesley Sneijder, Netherlands

11. Mesut Ozil, Germany

10. Arturo Vidal, Chile

9. Thiago Silva, Brazil

8. Manuel Neuer, Germany

7. Edinson Cavani, Uruguay

6. Philipp Lahm, Germany

5. Vincent Kompany, Belgium

4. Arjen Robben, Netherlands

3. Eden Hazard, Belgium

2. Robin van Persie, Netherlands

1. Lionel Messi, Argentina

 

Uruguay, without Suarez and proper defending, stunned 3-1 by Costa Rica

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All the focus pre-match was on Luis Suarez, but it might be that Uruguay need a solid defender before they worry about their talisman up front.

On the bench to start thanks to knee surgery just two weeks ago, Suarez saw his side break down defensively on more than one occasion as Joel Campbell and Oscar Duarte both struck soon after halftime to earn Costa Rica a 3-1 win.

Both teams started brightly but cautiously, as Costa Rica looked to lock down Uruguay’s Suarez-less attack with a very physical style of play.

It came back to bite them early, and while Yeltsin Tejeda got away with a disgusting two-footed challenge on Cristian Rodriguez, the ensuing free kick in the 24th minute saw Diego Lugano tackled football-style by Junior Diaz, and Edinson Cavani buried the penalty for a 1-0 Uruguay lead.

Down early, Los Ticos didn’t seem like they knew how to build a sustained attack, keeping the South Africa semifinalists at bay going forward but not finding many opportunities themselves. Joel Campbell fired just wide of the corner after the Cavani goal, but there wasn’t much else to note in the half.

Halftime saw Uruguay lose their edge, and coming out of the break there was a slight shift in momentum.

Costa Rica knew they were just a goal down despite the seeming Uruguay dominance, and they nearly pulled back level just five minutes after the break. Christian Bolanos took a free kick after a yellow card to Diego Lugano, and it sailed to Oscar Duarte at the post who headed on target, but right at Muslera who saved. Had he gone far post he may have drawn it 1-1.

source: AP
Arsenal’s Joel Campbell scored one and assisted another in Costa Rica’s upset of a semifinalist four years ago.

However, it would come level just three minutes later, as Uruguay held possession but could not prove incisive, and Costa Rica struck on the counter.

Combination play down the right-hand side saw a cross come in which sailed over Celso Borges, but the ball fell to a trailing Joel Campbell completely unmarked at the far post, and he powerfully buried the chance for an even score.

It wouldn’t be level for long, because the Uruguayans again failed miserably to defend set pieces and soaring balls into the box. Walter Gargano earned a questionable yellow card, and it set up another Costa Rican free kick.

Bolanos took the free kick to the far post, and Bolanos beat Cristian Stuani to the ball for a diving header that went across the face and into the net for a 2-1 Costa Rican lead.

Following the goal, the Costa Ricans once again shut up shop, and as they had throughout much of the first half, Uruguay claimed solid possession but couldn’t find anything solid on goal.

Looking for a shocking win, Jorge Pinto’s Costa Rica sealed the deal as the manager picked out a great substitution for an instant and memorable impact. Removing Bryan Ruiz who had been a creative menace much of the match, Pinto brought on Marcos Urena with seven minutes to go in regulation, and just a minute later he would put the game away.

On a lovely thread from Campbell, Urena slotted home a slow-roller from a tight angle past a helpless Muslera off his line for a 3-1 lead and one of Costa Rica’s best-ever wins.

Things were made even worse for Uruguay as Maxi Pereira needlessly hacked down Campbell in extra time just seconds from the final whistle, producing a baffling kick to the Costa Rican’s shins which produced the tournament’s first red card from the referee.

The upset surely makes the incredibly deep Group D much more interesting, as it would seem that two results and only two results will now get Uruguay through, and those points must come against England and Italy.  For Costa Rica, the win is a massive boost, and while there is still work to do to beat out a former World Cup champion to a knockout round berth, there is now serious hope that the previously unthinkable is possible.

[ MORE: Soccerly covers the World Cup ]

LINEUPS:

Uruguay – Muslera; Pereira, Lugano, Godin, Canaceres; Gargano (Gonzalez 60′), Arevalo, Rodriguez (Hernandez 76′), Stuani; Forlan (Lodeiro 60′), Cavani.

Goals: Cavani 24′

Costa Rica – Navas; Duarte, Umana, Gamboa, Gonzalez, Diaz; Borges, Tejada (Cubero 75′); Ruiz (Urena 83′), Campbell, Bolanos (Barrantes 89′).

Goals: Campbell 54′, Duarte 58′, Urena 84′

At halftime: Cavani nets penalty for 1-0 Uruguay lead over Costa Rica – FOLLOW LIVE

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Very physical play in the penalty area came back to bite Costa Rica, as they trail Uruguay 1-0 at the halftime break.

Los Ticos were toying with a penalty since the opening whistle, pushing and shoving Uruguayan attackers in the box on a number of occasions before the referee finally gave one in the 24th minute.

Edinson Cavani buried the penalty into the bottom-right corner, and Uruguay eased themselves ahead.

Yeltsin Tejeda was also lucky to not be sent off after an ugly two-footed challenge, further proving their over-enthusiasm coming into this game.

The South Americans looked the more dangerous by far, but Costa Rica wasn’t without chances of their own in a very attacking game.

FOLLOW LIVE: Soccerly’s real-time match center

Goals:

24′ – On a free kick into the box, Diego Lugano was taken down in the box rugby-style by Junior Diaz, and the referee awarded a penalty which Cavani slotted neatly into the net for a 1-0 lead.

Other key moments:

15′ – The service from Cristian Rodriguez wasn’t really that good, but a few deflections led to a Diego Godin tap-in that was rightly called back for offside.

16′ – Godin’s goal called back sparked Uruguay, and they had another chance a minute later but Cavani whiffed badly and didn’t even come close on the big opportunity.

22′ – Yeltsin Tejeda went in two feet studs up on Rodriguez, but somehow got away with no card whatsoever.  The Costa Ricans flirted with disaster on a number of occasions with their physical play, but somehow got out of the half with nary a card to their name. The ensuing free kick led directly to Uruguay’s penalty.

27′ – Costa Rica had their best chance yet when Joel Campbell, given plenty of space, took aim and fired from well outside the box, but he just barely missed a wonder strike past the top right corner.

43′ – A Costa Rican corner saw Uruguay’s goalkeeper Fernando Muslera sucked too far in, but the ball fell inches out of reach of Alvaro Gonzalez’s head at the back post.

44′ – Uruguay pushed down the other end, and Diego Forlan nearly picked himself out a spectacular chipped goal, but Keylor Navas tracked back and leaped to save the ball bound for the corner.

LINEUPS:

Uruguay – Muslera; Pereira, Lugano, Godin, Canaceres; Gargano, Arevalo, Rodriguez, Stuani; Forlan, Cavani.

Goals: Cavani 24′

Costa Rica – Navas; Duarte, Umana, Gamboa, Gonzalez, Diaz; Borges, Tejada; Ruiz, Campbell, Bolanos.

Questions for the second half:

  • Will Costa Rica put together a sustained attack? Trailing by 1, they’re not out of this match by any means, but in order to have a serious chance at leveling they need to build a solid attack, which they’ve been unable to do. There have been a fair amount of bright moments, but nothing more.
  • Can Uruguay put the game away? Despite their dominance on the base level, they’ve held just 50% of possession and Costa Rica has held their fair share of half-chances. Can the South Americans double their lead? The longer this match stays at 1-0 the more the confidence of Los Ticos will rise.